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Page 252

A PRINCE OF NEUROTICS : AELIUS ARISTIDES

besides the chill of which he died, had touched some beef from a sacrifice and suffered for it.
Those who read the Sacred Orations in the original may forget their fatuity in the ease, simplicity, and power of the style. To others they will appeal as a study in pathology, a document which brings us very near a human being and a sanatorium of 1,800 years ago, a portrait of the prince of neurotics. But Aristides is, or might have been, something more. His was one of those highly strung temperaments, charged with nervous energy, which supply the world with its impossible idealists, its artists, its religious devotees. Egoists at bottom they find their satisfaction in alliance with some cause outside themselves, which offers their genius an enlarged scope-Flaubert or Whistler forget themselves in art, Augustine in religion, Ruskin in preaching a philosophy of life. So the personality of Aristides expresses itself in a curious trinity of egoism, religion, and art, one developing out of the other.
His egoism needs no illustration. Inborn, it was riveted on him by a disease which turned his thoughts on himself. His religion centres round the deity to whose temples he went in search of health and who became his support. Here this neurotic forgot his powerlessness in the presence of a stronger power, sleeping in the temples, tended by the priests, and carrying out by day the suggestions of the dreams which the god was supposed to have sent. Real devotion speaks in his rhapsodies and real faith led him to bathe his broken body in icy streams. One seems at times to be listening to a medieval mystic. The relation of Aristides to his ` Saviour' is essentially one of personal contact and intimate conversation with the Divine : the essence of his religion is personal weakness and strength perfected in another : and phrases recur which recall Augustine or St. Paul.
I TOOK refuge in the temple of Asclepius, considering that if I was to be saved, it was nobler to be saved by him, but if this was impossible, that it was time to die.

I seemed to touch the god and discern that he was himself there ; I seemed to be between sleeping and waking, and to

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE besides what is chill of which he died, had touched some beef from a travel and suffered for it. Those who read what is Sacred Orations in what is original may forget their fatuity in what is ease, simplicity, and power of what is style. To others they will appeal as a study in pathology, a document which brings us very near a human being and a sanatorium of 1,800 years ago, a portrait of what is prince of neurotics. But Aristides is, or might have been, something more. His was one of those highly strung temperaments, charged with nervous energy, which supply what is world with its impossible idealists, its artists, its religious devotees. Egoists at bottom they find their satisfaction in alliance with some cause outside themselves, which offers their genius an enlarged scope-Flaubert or Whistler forget themselves in art, Augustine in religion, Ruskin in preaching a philosophy of life. So what is personality of Aristides expresses itself in a curious trinity of egoism, religion, and art, one developing out of what is other. His egoism needs no illustration. Inborn, it was riveted on him by a disease which turned his thoughts on himself. His religion centres round what is deity to whose temples he went in search of health and who became his support. Here this neurotic forgot his powerlessness in what is presence of a stronger power, sleeping in what is temples, tended by what is priests, and carrying out by day what is suggestions of what is dreams which what is god was supposed to have sent. Real devotion speaks in his rhapsodies and real faith led him to bathe his broken body in icy streams. One seems at times to be listening to a medieval mystic. what is relation of Aristides to his ` Saviour' is essentially one of personal contact and intimate conversation with what is Divine : what is essence of his religion is personal weakness and strength perfected in another : and phrases recur which recall Augustine or St. Paul. I TOOK refuge in what is temple of Asclepius, considering that if I was to be saved, it was nobler to be saved by him, but if this was impossible, that it was time to die. I seemed to touch what is god and discern that he was himself there ; I seemed to be between sleeping and waking, and to where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 252 where is p align="center" where is strong A PRINCE OF NEUROTICS : AELIUS ARISTIDES where is p align="justify" besides what is chill of which he died, had touched some beef from a travel and suffered for it. Those who read what is Sacred Orations in what is original may forget their fatuity in what is ease, simplicity, and power of what is style. To others they will appeal as a study in pathology, a document which brings us very near a human being and a sanatorium of 1,800 years ago, a portrait of what is prince of neurotics. But Aristides is, or might have been, something more. His was one of those highly strung temperaments, charged with nervous energy, which supply what is world with its impossible idealists, its artists, its religious devotees. Egoists at bottom they find their satisfaction in alliance with some cause outside themselves, which offers their genius an enlarged scope-Flaubert or Whistler forget themselves in art, Augustine in religion, Ruskin in preaching a philosophy of life. So what is personality of Aristides expresses itself in a curious trinity of egoism, religion, and art, one developing out of what is other. His egoism needs no illustration. Inborn, it was riveted on him by a disease which turned his thoughts on himself. His religion centres round what is deity to whose temples he went in search of health and who became his support. Here this neurotic forgot his powerlessness in what is presence of a stronger power, sleeping in what is temples, tended by what is priests, and carrying out by day what is suggestions of the dreams which what is god was supposed to have sent. Real devotion speaks in his rhapsodies and real faith led him to bathe his broken body in icy streams. One seems at times to be listening to a medieval mystic. what is relation of Aristides to his ` Saviour' is essentially one of personal contact and intimate conversation with what is Divine : what is essence of his religion is personal weakness and strength perfected in another : and phrases recur which recall Augustine or St. Paul. I TOOK refuge in what is temple of Asclepius, considering that if I was to be saved, it was nobler to be saved by him, but if this was impossible, that it was time to die. I seemed to touch what is god and discern that he was himself there ; I seemed to be between sleeping and waking, and to where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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