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Page 240

A PRINCE OF NEUROTICS : AELIUS ARISTIDES

after he had recovered, but are based on notes of his dreams taken at the time. His illness was nervous : the variety of his symptoms, the rapid transformation of one complaint into another, the absence of organic ~,isorder, the restoration to health after a long period, are el'iough to show this. His character and occupation were favourable to such a disease. Self-centred and excitable, he was devoted to literary work, which tries the nerves, and instead of giving outside interests focuses the mind on itself. The spectacle which Aristides affords is more curious than attractive. But even those who find his faults overpowering may be entertained by the picture of the little society to be met in the temple courtsinvalids and sympathizers, puzzled doctors and astute attendants of the god ; Dr. Satyrus, whose ` light and simple ' plaster proved so disastrous ; Senator Sedatus, 'best of men', who had come from Rome for the treatment ; Epagathus, Aristides' first tutor, ` a very good man who unmistakably had communion with God and remembered entire dream oracles'; his old nurse, ` dearest Philumene', and the rest. Particularly amusing and characteristic of a neurotic is his attitude to doctors. He had many, and they did their worst on him ; and the worst of the second century was bad. He mistrusted them, not unjustifiably, though always ready to take their preposterous prescriptions. He loves to represent them as baffled or mistaken, but he keeps returning to them.
The following passage recounts the origin of his complaint, and gives a lively picture of ancient travelling in the winter :

I LEFT for Rome in mid-winter, and from the date of my leaving suffered from wet and cold; but I paid no attention to the conditions, trusting in my physical training and my invariable good luck. By the time I had reached the Dardanelles I was suffering violently in my ear, and was generally in an abnormal condition. After recovering a little I proceeded. There followed rain, frost, ice, every kind of wind. The Danube had recently been broken up, so that boats could cross ; otherwise the ice had turned everything into land, and there were flooded plains as far as the eye could reach. Inns were scarce, and more water came through the roof within than fell from the sky without. Amid all this I hurried and raced onwards

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE after he had recovered, but are based on notes of his dreams taken at what is time. His illness was nervous : what is variety of his symptoms, what is rapid transformation of one complaint into another, what is absence of organic ~,isorder, what is restoration to health after a long period, are el'iough to show this. His character and occupation were favourable to such a disease. Self-centred and excitable, he was devoted to literary work, which tries what is nerves, and instead of giving outside interests focuses what is mind on itself. what is spectacle which Aristides affords is more curious than attractive. But even those who find his faults overpowering may be entertained by what is picture of what is little society to be met in what is temple courtsinvalids and sympathizers, puzzled doctors and astute attendants of what is god ; Dr. Satyrus, whose ` light and simple ' plaster proved so disastrous ; Senator Sedatus, 'best of men', who had come from Rome for what is treatment ; Epagathus, Aristides' first tutor, ` a very good man who unmistakably had communion with God and remembered entire dream oracles'; his old nurse, ` dearest Philumene', and what is rest. Particularly amusing and characteristic of a neurotic is his attitude to doctors. He had many, and they did their worst on him ; and what is worst of what is second century was bad. He mistrusted them, not unjustifiably, though always ready to take their preposterous prescriptions. He loves to represent them as baffled or mistaken, but he keeps returning to them. what is following passage recounts what is origin of his complaint, and gives a lively picture of ancient travelling in what is winter : I LEFT for Rome in mid-winter, and from what is date of my leaving suffered from wet and cold; but I paid no attention to what is conditions, trusting in my physical training and my invariable good luck. By what is time I had reached what is Dardanelles I was suffering bad ly in my ear, and was generally in an abnormal condition. After recovering a little I proceeded. There followed rain, frost, ice, every kind of wind. what is Danube had recently been broken up, so that boats could cross ; otherwise what is ice had turned everything into land, and there were flooded plains as far as what is eye could reach. Inns were scarce, and more water came through what is roof within than fell from what is sky without. Amid all this I hurried and raced onwards where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 240 where is p align="center" where is strong A PRINCE OF NEUROTICS : AELIUS ARISTIDES where is p align="justify" after he had recovered, but are based on notes of his dreams taken at what is time. His illness was nervous : the variety of his symptoms, what is rapid transformation of one complaint into another, what is absence of organic ~,isorder, what is restoration to health after a long period, are el'iough to show this. His character and occupation were favourable to such a disease. Self-centred and excitable, he was devoted to literary work, which tries the nerves, and instead of giving outside interests focuses what is mind on itself. what is spectacle which Aristides affords is more curious than attractive. But even those who find his faults overpowering may be entertained by what is picture of what is little society to be met in what is temple courtsinvalids and sympathizers, puzzled doctors and astute attendants of what is god ; Dr. Satyrus, whose ` light and simple ' plaster proved so disastrous ; Senator Sedatus, 'best of men', who had come from Rome for what is treatment ; Epagathus, Aristides' first tutor, ` a very good man who unmistakably had communion with God and remembered entire dream oracles'; his old nurse, ` dearest Philumene', and what is rest. Particularly amusing and characteristic of a neurotic is his attitude to doctors. He had many, and they did their worst on him ; and what is worst of the second century was bad. He mistrusted them, not unjustifiably, though always ready to take their preposterous prescriptions. He loves to represent them as baffled or mistaken, but he keeps returning to them. what is following passage recounts what is origin of his complaint, and gives a lively picture of ancient travelling in what is winter : I LEFT for Rome in mid-winter, and from what is date of my leaving suffered from wet and cold; but I paid no attention to what is conditions, trusting in my physical training and my invariable good luck. By what is time I had reached what is Dardanelles I was suffering bad ly in my ear, and was generally in an abnormal condition. After recovering a little I proceeded. There followed rain, frost, ice, every kind of wind. what is Danube had recently been broken up, so that boats could cross ; otherwise what is ice had turned everything into land, and there were flooded plains as far as what is eye could reach. Inns were scarce, and more water came through what is roof within than fell from what is sky without. Amid all this I hurried and raced onwards where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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