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Page 239

A PRINCE OF NEUROTICS : AELIUS ARISTIDES

THERE can be fewer greater instances of wasted genius than Aelius Aristides. In some ways no Greek writer of this period is his intellectual equal. One of the great masters of the Greek language, he used it to record what no one cares to read. An acute dialectician, he employs his gift to prove with entire sincerity and seriousness what is either false or not worth proving.
He was the son of a priest of Zeus and born about 129 B. C. in a small town in Asia Minor. A delicate boy with an early passion for literature, he conceived a romantic enthusiasm for Egypt and visited it four times before he was twenty-six. A journey to Rome at this age induced a nervous disease, and he spent the next seventeen years in search of health, chiefly at temples of Asclepius, where treatment by suggestion was combined with baths and an open-air life. Then came a period of recovered health, in which his chief works were written. He died about 189, after a life divided between nervous illness, ` cures', and the literary pursuits of a sophist. He was a leader in his profession : no one more idealized literature into a religion. But it is not his sophistic activities that chiefly concern us here. Fifty-five works by him have survived. They include historical harangues ; speeches in praise of cities, somewhat resembling the impressionist sketches (Sensations d'Italie, &c.) at which the French are adepts, and showing us the cities of Asia as a second-century Greek saw them ; religious hymns ; literary pronouncements, including two very long defences of rhetoric against the philosophers ; and six books of a diary describing his illness. These are all written in the purest Attic, and, though perfectly individual, are indistinguishable in language from writings of five centuries earlier. They are terribly diffuse, egoistic, and silly, but written in a style which bears comparison with the greatest Greek writers.
The following extracts from the Diaries or' Sacred Orations' introduce us at once to the man. They were mainly written

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE THERE can be fewer greater instances of wasted genius than Aelius Aristides. In some ways no Greek writer of this period is his intellectual equal. One of what is great masters of what is Greek language, he used it to record what no one cares to read. An acute dialectician, he employs his gift to prove with entire sincerity and seriousness what is either false or not worth proving. He was what is son of a priest of Zeus and born about 129 B. C. in a small town in Asia Minor. A delicate boy with an early passion for literature, he conceived a romantic enthusiasm for Egypt and what is ed it four times before he was twenty-six. A journey to Rome at this age induced a nervous disease, and he spent what is next seventeen years in search of health, chiefly at temples of Asclepius, where treatment by suggestion was combined with baths and an open-air life. Then came a period of recovered health, in which his chief works were written. He died about 189, after a life divided between nervous illness, ` cures', and what is literary pursuits of a sophist. He was a leader in his profession : no one more idealized literature into a religion. But it is not his sophistic activities that chiefly concern us here. Fifty-five works by him have survived. They include historical harangues ; speeches in praise of cities, somewhat resembling what is impressionist sketches (Sensations d'Italie, &c.) at which what is French are adepts, and showing us what is cities of Asia as a second-century Greek saw them ; religious hymns ; literary pronouncements, including two very long defences of rhetoric against what is philosophers ; and six books of a diary describing his illness. These are all written in what is purest Attic, and, though perfectly individual, are indistinguishable in language from writings of five centuries earlier. They are terribly diffuse, egoistic, and silly, but written in a style which bears comparison with what is greatest Greek writers. what is following extracts from what is Diaries or' Sacred Orations' introduce us at once to what is man. They were mainly written where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 239 where is p align="center" where is strong A PRINCE OF NEUROTICS : AELIUS ARISTIDES where is p align="justify" THERE can be fewer greater instances of wasted genius than Aelius Aristides. In some ways no Greek writer of this period is his intellectual equal. One of what is great masters of the Greek language, he used it to record what no one cares to read. An acute dialectician, he employs his gift to prove with entire sincerity and seriousness what is either false or not worth proving. He was what is son of a priest of Zeus and born about 129 B. C. in a small town in Asia Minor. A delicate boy with an early passion for literature, he conceived a romantic enthusiasm for Egypt and what is ed it four times before he was twenty-six. A journey to Rome at this age induced a nervous disease, and he spent what is next seventeen years in search of health, chiefly at temples of Asclepius, where treatment by suggestion was combined with baths and an open-air life. Then came a period of recovered health, in which his chief works were written. He died about 189, after a life divided between nervous illness, ` cures', and what is literary pursuits of a sophist. He was a leader in his profession : no one more idealized literature into a religion. But it is not his sophistic activities that chiefly concern us here. Fifty-five works by him have survived. They include historical harangues ; speeches in praise of cities, somewhat resembling what is impressionist sketches (Sensations d'Italie, &c.) at which what is French are adepts, and showing us what is cities of Asia as a second-century Greek saw them ; religious hymns ; literary pronouncements, including two very long defences of rhetoric against what is philosophers ; and six books of a diary describing his illness. These are all written in what is purest Attic, and, though perfectly individual, are indistinguishable in language from writings of five centuries earlier. They are terribly diffuse, egoistic, and silly, but written in a style which bears comparison with what is greatest Greek writers. what is following extracts from what is Diaries or' Sacred Orations' introduce us at once to what is man. They were mainly written where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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