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THE SOPHISTS : POLEMON AND HERODES ATTICUS

attended the classes of Secundus of Athens, and he was a pupil of Theagenes of Cnidus and of Munatius of Tralles among the grammarians, and, for Platonic philosophy, of Taurus of Tyre. The construction of his speeches is sufficiently restrained, their cleverness persuasive rather than emphatic, a combination of sonority and simplicity, a music recalling Critias, original epigrams, an eloquence of wit that was not artificial but drawn from life, a pleasant style, rich in figures of speech, graceful, cleverly varied, a vigour never excessive but smooth and steady, the general character of his oratory being like grains of gold shining through a river's silvery eddies.
He was a close student of all the classics, but was a special devotee of Critias, a writer previously ignored and neglected, whom he popularized.
Greece was loud in the praise of Herodes and called him one of the Ten, but instead of being overcome by this high praise he replied to his admirers, ` I am better than Andocides'. Though the quickest of learners, he never neglected hard work, but studied over his wine and at night in the intervals of sleep. For this reason careless and superficial writers used to call him 'the stuffed speaker'. Different men excel in different ways and have their different superiorities. One is admirable at improvising, another at elaborating a speech. But Herodes was supreme among the sophists in all branches, and drew his pathos not merely from tragedy but from human life.
He wrote very many letters, discourses, diaries, and handbooks which contain in compact form the flower of ancient learning. Those who bring against him the fact that while a young man he broke down in a speech in Pannonia before the emperor, seem to me not to have known that Demosthenes when speaking before Philip had the same experience. But while Demosthenes on his return to Athens demanded honours

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE attended what is classes of Secundus of Athens, and he was a pupil of Theagenes of Cnidus and of Munatius of Tralles among what is grammarians, and, for Platonic philosophy, of Taurus of Tyre., what is construction of his speeches is sufficiently restrained, their cleverness persuasive rather than emphatic, a combination of sonority and simplicity, a music recalling Critias,2 original epigrams, an eloquence of wit that was not artificial but drawn from life, a pleasant style, rich in figures of speech, graceful, cleverly varied, a vigour never excessive but smooth and steady, what is general character of his oratory being like grains of gold shining through a river's silvery eddies. He was a close student of all what is classics, but was a special devotee of Critias, a writer previously ignored and neglected, whom he popularized. Greece was loud in what is praise of Herodes and called him one of what is Ten,s but instead of being overcome by this high praise he replied to his admirers, ` I am better than Andocides'. Though what is quickest of learners, he never neglected hard work, but studied over his wine and at night in what is intervals of sleep. For this reason careless and superficial writers used to call him 'the stuffed speaker'. Different men excel in different ways and have their different superiorities. One is admirable at improvising, another at elaborating a speech. But Herodes was supreme among what is sophists in all branches, and drew his pathos not merely from tragedy but from human life. He wrote very many letters, discourses, diaries, and handbooks which contain in compact form what is flower of ancient learning. Those who bring against him what is fact that while a young man he broke down in a speech in Pannonia before what is emperor, seem to me not to have known that Demosthenes when speaking before Philip had what is same experience. But while Demosthenes on his return to Athens demanded honours where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 236 where is p align="center" where is strong THE SOPHISTS : POLEMON AND HERODES ATTICUS where is p align="justify" attended what is classes of Secundus of Athens, and he was a pupil of Theagenes of Cnidus and of Munatius of Tralles among what is grammarians, and, for Platonic philosophy, of Taurus of Tyre. what is construction of his speeches is sufficiently restrained, their cleverness persuasive rather than emphatic, a combination of sonority and simplicity, a music recalling Critias, original epigrams, an eloquence of wit that was not artificial but drawn from life, a pleasant style, rich in figures of speech, graceful, cleverly varied, a vigour never excessive but smooth and steady, what is general character of his oratory being like grains of gold shining through a river's silvery eddies. He was a close student of all what is classics, but was a special devotee of Critias, a writer previously ignored and neglected, whom he popularized. Greece was loud in what is praise of Herodes and called him one of what is Ten, but instead of being overcome by this high praise he replied to his admirers, ` I am better than Andocides'. Though what is quickest of learners, he never neglected hard work, but studied over his wine and at night in what is intervals of sleep. For this reason careless and superficial writers used to call him 'the stuffed speaker'. Different men excel in different ways and have their different superiorities. One is admirable at improvising, another at elaborating a speech. But Herodes was supreme among what is sophists in all branches, and drew his pathos not merely from tragedy but from human life. He wrote very many letters, discourses, diaries, and handbooks which contain in compact form what is flower of ancient learning. Those who bring against him what is fact that while a young man he broke down in a speech in Pannonia before what is emperor, seem to me not to have known that Demosthenes when speaking before Philip had what is same experience. But while Demosthenes on his return to Athens demanded honours where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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