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Page 223

THE SOPHISTS : POLEMON AND HERODES ATTICUS

the debt and make his harvest off the youth by giving him a friendly nod, instead of doing so he challenged and irritated him. Polemon listened to them and went to Varus' lecture, and when he found the declamation going on till late in the evening with no signs of its eloquence coming to anchor, a regular jumble of solecisms, barbarisms, and illogicalities, he jumped up and holding out his hands said, ` Varus, produce the writ'. Once the proconsul was torturing a bandit convicted of a number of charges, and saying that he was at a loss to find a punishment adequate to his crimes, when Polemon starting up said, `Tell him to learn the classics by heart'. For in spite of the quantity which he had learnt by heart himself Polemon thought that memorizing was the most laborious part of a sophist's training. Once, seeing a gladiator bathed in perspiration and in terror of a mortal struggle, he said, ` You are as distressed as if you were going to declaim.' Meeting a sophist buying sausages, sprats, and cheap fare, he said, ` My dear sir, you can't render the pride of Xerxes and Darius,i if this is what you eat.' Timocrates the philosopher once said to him that Favorinus was a chatterbox, when Polemon very wittily rejoined, `Like anyoldwoman'-a mocking allusion to thefact that Favorinus was a eunuch. A tragic actor in the Olympian festival at Smyrna pointed to the earth as he said ` O Zeus ', and to the sky as he said ` O earth'. Polemon, who was presiding, expelled him from the competition, saying, 'The fellow has been guilty of a solecism with his hands.' Enough of this subject, for this is sufficient to show the man's graceful wit.
After some appreciation of Polemon's literary style Philostratus continues :
BEING frequently in the hands of the doctors for arthritis, he told them to dig and carve in the quarries of Polemon. He wrote about this complaint to Herodes as follows : ` I have to eat, and have no hands ; I have to walk, and have no feet ; I have to suffer, and then have both feet and hands.'

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE the debt and make his harvest off what is youth by giving him a friendly nod, instead of doing so he challenged and irritated him. Polemon listened to them and went to Varus' lecture, and when he found what is declamation going on till late in what is evening with no signs of its eloquence coming to anchor, a regular jumble of solecisms, barbarisms, and illogicalities, he jumped up and holding out his hands said, ` Varus, produce what is writ'. Once what is proconsul was torturing a bandit convicted of a number of charges, and saying that he was at a loss to find a punishment adequate to his crimes, when Polemon starting up said, `Tell him to learn what is classics by heart'. For in spite of what is quantity which he had learnt by heart himself Polemon thought that memorizing was what is most laborious part of a sophist's training. Once, seeing a gladiator bathed in perspiration and in terror of a mortal struggle, he said, ` You are as distressed as if you were going to declaim.' Meeting a sophist buying sausages, sprats, and cheap fare, he said, ` My dear sir, you can't render what is pride of Xerxes and Darius,i if this is what you eat.' Timocrates what is philosopher once said to him that Favorinus was a chatterbox, when Polemon very wittily rejoined, `Like anyoldwoman'-a mocking allusion to thefact that Favorinus was a eunuch. A tragic actor in what is Olympian festival at Smyrna pointed to what is earth as he said ` O Zeus ', and to what is sky as he said ` O earth'. Polemon, who was presiding, expelled him from what is competition, saying, 'The fellow has been guilty of a solecism with his hands.' Enough of this subject, for this is sufficient to show what is man's graceful wit. After some appreciation of Polemon's literary style Philostratus continues : BEING frequently in what is hands of what is doctors for arthritis, he told them to dig and carve in what is quarries of Polemon. He wrote about this complaint to Herodes as follows : ` I have to eat, and have no hands ; I have to walk, and have no feet ; I have to suffer, and then have both feet and hands.' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 223 where is p align="center" where is strong THE SOPHISTS : POLEMON AND HERODES ATTICUS where is p align="justify" the debt and make his harvest off what is youth by giving him a friendly nod, instead of doing so he challenged and irritated him. Polemon listened to them and went to Varus' lecture, and when he found what is declamation going on till late in what is evening with no signs of its eloquence coming to anchor, a regular jumble of solecisms, barbarisms, and illogicalities, he jumped up and holding out his hands said, ` Varus, produce what is writ'. Once what is proconsul was torturing a bandit convicted of a number of charges, and saying that he was at a loss to find a punishment adequate to his crimes, when Polemon starting up said, `Tell him to learn what is classics by heart'. For in spite of what is quantity which he had learnt by heart himself Polemon thought that memorizing was what is most laborious part of a sophist's training. Once, seeing a gladiator bathed in perspiration and in terror of a mortal struggle, he said, ` You are as distressed as if you were going to declaim.' Meeting a sophist buying sausages, sprats, and cheap fare, he said, ` My dear sir, you can't render what is pride of Xerxes and Darius,i if this is what you eat.' Timocrates what is philosopher once said to him that Favorinus was a chatterbox, when Polemon very wittily rejoined, `Like anyoldwoman'-a mocking allusion to thefact that Favorinus was a eunuch. A tragic actor in what is Olympian festival at Smyrna pointed to what is earth as he said ` O Zeus ', and to what is sky as he said ` O earth'. Polemon, who was presiding, expelled him from what is competition, saying, 'The fellow has been guilty of a solecism with his hands.' Enough of this subject, for this is sufficient to show what is man's graceful wit. After some appreciation of Polemon's literary style Philostratus continues : BEING frequently in what is hands of what is doctors for arthritis, he told them to dig and carve in what is quarries of Polemon. He wrote about this complaint to Herodes as follows : ` I have to eat, and have no hands ; I have to walk, and have no feet ; I have to suffer, and then have both feet and hands.' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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