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Page 221

THE SOPHISTS : POLEMON AND HERODES ATTICUS

ended ; in the third he disbanded the Athenians into their demes after Aegospotami. Herodes states that he sent Polemon 6,000, calling it a lecture fee, but, when Polemon declined it, thought himself treated with contempt, till the critic Munatius while dining with him remarked: ` I fancy, Herodes, that Polemon had a dream of 10,000, and thought himself injured in the degree in which your present fell short of this.' Herodes says that he added the extra 4,000 and that Polemon took it eagerly as his due. Another gift of Herodes to Polemon was that he abstained from competing with him by following him on the public platform, and that he left Smyrna by night to avoid being compelled to do so-a compulsion which he regarded as impudent. For the rest of his life he continued to praise Polemon and to admire him extremely. Thus, after a brilliant speech about the trophies, which was admired for its fire, he said, ` Read Polemon's speech and you will see a man '. When all Greece acclaimed him at the Olympic festival, shouting, 'You are a second Demosthenes ', he rejoined, ` I wish I was a second Phrygian '. This was how he described Polemon, for at that time Laodicea was part of Phrygia. When the Emperor Marcus asked him, 'What do you think of Polemon ?' he replied with fixed gaze,
Thunder of swift-foot steeds beats on my ears,'
indicating the sonorous and ringing quality of his speeches. When the consul Varus asked him who were his teachers,' Soand-so,' he said, 'and So-and-so, when I was a pupil ; Polemon, when I had become a master'.
Polemon states that he attended Dion Chrysostom's lectures and went to Bithynia for this purpose. He used to say that one should draw on prose-writers by handfuls, on poets by wagonloads. The following is among his glories. Smyrna was engaged in a dispute about its temples and their rights, and made Polemon a counsel in the suit at the close of his life. He died

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE ended ; in what is third he disbanded what is Athenians into their demes after Aegospotami. Herodes states that he sent Polemon 6,000, calling it a lecture fee, but, when Polemon declined it, thought himself treated with contempt, till what is critic Munatius while dining with him remarked: ` I fancy, Herodes, that Polemon had a dream of 10,000, and thought himself injured in what is degree in which your present fell short of this.' Herodes says that he added what is extra 4,000 and that Polemon took it eagerly as his due. Another gift of Herodes to Polemon was that he abstained from competing with him by following him on what is public platform, and that he left Smyrna by night to avoid being compelled to do so-a compulsion which he regarded as impudent. For what is rest of his life he continued to praise Polemon and to admire him extremely. Thus, after a brilliant speech about what is trophies, which was admired for its fire, he said, ` Read Polemon's speech and you will see a man '. When all Greece acclaimed him at what is Olympic festival, shouting, 'You are a second Demosthenes ', he rejoined, ` I wish I was a second Phrygian '. This was how he described Polemon, for at that time Laodicea was part of Phrygia. When what is Emperor Marcus asked him, 'What do you think of Polemon ?' he replied with fixed gaze, Thunder of swift-foot steeds beats on my ears,' indicating what is sonorous and ringing quality of his speeches. When what is consul Varus asked him who were his teachers,' Soand-so,' he said, 'and So-and-so, when I was a pupil ; Polemon, when I had become a master'. Polemon states that he attended Dion Chrysostom's lectures and went to Bithynia for this purpose. He used to say that one should draw on prose-writers by handfuls, on poets by wagonloads. what is following is among his glories. Smyrna was engaged in a dispute about its temples and their rights, and made Polemon a counsel in what is suit at what is close of his life. He died where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 221 where is p align="center" where is strong THE SOPHISTS : POLEMON AND HERODES ATTICUS where is p align="justify" ended ; in what is third he disbanded what is Athenians into their demes after Aegospotami. Herodes states that he sent Polemon 6,000, calling it a lecture fee, but, when Polemon declined it, thought himself treated with contempt, till what is critic Munatius while dining with him remarked: ` I fancy, Herodes, that Polemon had a dream of 10,000, and thought himself injured in what is degree in which your present fell short of this.' Herodes says that he added what is extra 4,000 and that Polemon took it eagerly as his due. Another gift of Herodes to Polemon was that he abstained from competing with him by following him on what is public platform, and that he left Smyrna by night to avoid being compelled to do so-a compulsion which he regarded as impudent. For what is rest of his life he continued to praise Polemon and to admire him extremely. Thus, after a brilliant speech about what is trophies, which was admired for its fire, he said, ` Read Polemon's speech and you will see a man '. When all Greece acclaimed him at what is Olympic festival, shouting, 'You are a second Demosthenes ', he rejoined, ` I wish I was a second Phrygian '. This was how he described Polemon, for at that time Laodicea was part of Phrygia. When what is Emperor Marcus asked him, 'What do you think of Polemon ?' he replied with fixed gaze, Thunder of swift-foot steeds beats on my ears,' indicating what is sonorous and ringing quality of his speeches. When what is consul Varus asked him who were his teachers,' Soand-so,' he said, 'and So-and-so, when I was a pupil ; Polemon, when I had become a master'. Polemon states that he attended Dion Chrysostom's lectures and went to Bithynia for this purpose. He used to say that one should draw on prose-writers by handfuls, on poets by wagonloads. The following is among his glories. Smyrna was engaged in a dispute about its temples and their rights, and made Polemon a counsel in what is suit at what is close of his life. He died where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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