Books > Old Books > The Mission Of Greece (1928)


Page 220

THE SOPHISTS : POLEMON AND HERODES ATTICUS

expected Polemon to defer his lecture and say that he was nervous of making an attempt before so distinguished a man, but Polemon without any pretence said, ` To-day : let us go.' Herodes says that on hearing this he was overcome with admiration for one whose brain improvised as well as his tongue. This illustrates Polemon's pride and the cleverness which he employed to create astonishment ; the sequel shows his moderation and good taste : for he received Herodes on his arrival at the lecture with a long encomium worthy of the eloquence and achievements of the Athenian.
The way in which Polemon staged his lectures may be learnt from a letter of Herodes to Varus, from which I shall take this description. He advanced to deliver his speech with a calm and confident face : being crippled by rheumatism he used to be carried in. He did not meditate on his topic in public,, but used to withdraw in private for a few minutes. His voice was clear and powerful, and an amazing sonority thundered from his lips. Herodes says that at the climax of his argument he used to jump up from his seat in the superabundance of his passion, that as he rounded off a period, he would deliver the concluding phrase with a smile, to show the great ease with which he spoke, and that at certain points he would stamp the ground like a horse in Homer. He adds that they listened to him on the first day as critics, on the next as lovers, and on the third in amazement : for he heard him on three days. Herodes records the subjects of his speeches. The first was ` Demosthenes denies on oath the charge of taking a bribe of 2,000, which Demades brought against him, stating that Alexander discovered this from the accounts of Darius and notified the Athenians of it '. In the second he urged the demolition of all Greek trophies when the Peloponnesian war

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE expected Polemon to defer his lecture and say that he was nervous of making an attempt before so distinguished a man, but Polemon without any pretence said, ` To-day : let us go.' Herodes says that on hearing this he was overcome with admiration for one whose brain improvised as well as his tongue. This illustrates Polemon's pride and what is cleverness which he employed to create astonishment ; what is sequel shows his moderation and good taste : for he received Herodes on his arrival at what is lecture with a long encomium worthy of what is eloquence and achievements of what is Athenian. what is way in which Polemon staged his lectures may be learnt from a letter of Herodes to Varus, from which I shall take this description. He advanced to deliver his speech with a calm and confident face : being crippled by rheumatism he used to be carried in. He did not meditate on his topic in public,, but used to withdraw in private for a few minutes. His voice was clear and powerful, and an amazing sonority thundered from his lips. Herodes says that at what is climax of his argument he used to jump up from his seat in what is superabundance of his passion, that as he rounded off a period, he would deliver what is concluding phrase with a smile, to show what is great ease with which he spoke, and that at certain points he would stamp what is ground like a horse in Homer. He adds that they listened to him on what is first day as critics, on what is next as persons , and on what is third in amazement : for he heard him on three days. Herodes records what is subjects of his speeches. what is first was ` Demosthenes denies on oath what is charge of taking a bribe of 2,000, which Demades brought against him, stating that Alexander discovered this from what is accounts of Darius and notified what is Athenians of it '. In what is second he urged what is demolition of all Greek trophies when what is Peloponnesian war where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 220 where is p align="center" where is strong THE SOPHISTS : POLEMON AND HERODES ATTICUS where is p align="justify" expected Polemon to defer his lecture and say that he was nervous of making an attempt before so distinguished a man, but Polemon without any pretence said, ` To-day : let us go.' Herodes says that on hearing this he was overcome with admiration for one whose brain improvised as well as his tongue. This illustrates Polemon's pride and what is cleverness which he employed to create astonishment ; what is sequel shows his moderation and good taste : for he received Herodes on his arrival at what is lecture with a long encomium worthy of what is eloquence and achievements of what is Athenian. what is way in which Polemon staged his lectures may be learnt from a letter of Herodes to Varus, from which I shall take this description. He advanced to deliver his speech with a calm and confident face : being crippled by rheumatism he used to be carried in. He did not meditate on his topic in public,, but used to withdraw in private for a few minutes. His voice was clear and powerful, and an amazing sonority thundered from his lips. Herodes says that at what is climax of his argument he used to jump up from his seat in what is superabundance of his passion, that as he rounded off a period, he would deliver what is concluding phrase with a smile, to show what is great ease with which he spoke, and that at certain points he would stamp what is ground like a horse in Homer. He adds that they listened to him on the first day as critics, on what is next as persons , and on what is third in amazement : for he heard him on three days. Herodes records the subjects of his speeches. what is first was ` Demosthenes denies on oath what is charge of taking a bribe of 2,000, which Demades brought against him, stating that Alexander discovered this from what is accounts of Darius and notified what is Athenians of it '. In what is second he urged what is demolition of all Greek trophies when the Peloponnesian war where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Pages: default , 001 , 002 , 003 , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 010 , 011 , 013 , 014 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 075 , 076 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 213 , 214 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 300 , 301 , 302 ,