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THE SOPHISTS : POLEMON AND HERODES ATTICUS

and the arrogance of a man. For Polemon's arrogance was such that he spoke to cities as a superior, to princes on their own level, to gods as an equal. He was giving an exhibition of his powers of extempore speech to the Athenians, on his first visit to their city. Yet, though there are so many things one might say about Athens, he did not resort to praising her. Nor did he enlarge on his own fame, though this is a topic which sophists have found useful in their displays. He knew well that the right course was to impress rather than to elate the Athenian temperament, and he spoke as follows: ` Men say, Athenians, that you are skilled critics of eloquence. I shall soon see.' Once a prince of the Bosphorus, completely equipped with Greek culture, came to Smyrna while studying Ionia. Polemon not only failed to pay him court, but when the prince requested a lecture continually put him off, till he compelled the foreigner to come to his door with a fee of 2,400. When he went to Pergamum suffering from rheumatism and slept in the temple of Asclepius, the god appeared to him and directed him to abstain from cold drinks. 'My dear sir! ' remarked Polemon ;` and suppose you were treating a cow ?'
He imbibed this lofty and self-confident attitude from the philosopher Timocrates, with whom he associated for four years during his visit to Ionia.
Polemon treated Herodes of Athens sometimes as a superior, sometimes as an inferior. I wish to describe their relations, which were fine and memorable. Herodes was more enamoured of his powers of improvisation than of his consular rank and descent. He did not know Polemon, and coming to Smyrna to hear him about the time when the sophist was Administrator of the Free Cities of Asia, he embraced him in a most affectionate way, and as he withdrew his lips from Polemon's, said : ` Father, when shall I have a chance of hearing you? ' He

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE and what is arrogance of a man. For Polemon's arrogance was such that he spoke to cities as a superior, to princes on their own level, to gods as an equal. He was giving an exhibition of his powers of extempore speech to what is Athenians, on his first what is to their city. Yet, though there are so many things one might say about Athens, he did not resort to praising her. Nor did he enlarge on his own fame, though this is a topic which sophists have found useful in their displays. He knew well that what is right course was to impress rather than to elate what is Athenian temperament, and he spoke as follows: ` Men say, Athenians, that you are s what time is it ed critics of eloquence. I shall soon see.' Once a prince of what is Bosphorus, completely equipped with Greek culture, came to Smyrna while studying Ionia. Polemon not only failed to pay him court, but when what is prince requested a lecture continually put him off, till he compelled what is foreigner to come to his door with a fee of 2,400. When he went to Pergamum suffering from rheumatism and slept in what is temple of Asclepius, what is god appeared to him and directed him to abstain from cold drinks. 'My dear sir! ' remarked Polemon ;` and suppose you were treating a cow ?' He imbibed this lofty and self-confident attitude from what is philosopher Timocrates, with whom he associated for four years during his what is to Ionia. Polemon treated Herodes of Athens sometimes as a superior, sometimes as an inferior. I wish to describe their relations, which were fine and memorable. Herodes was more enamoured of his powers of improvisation than of his consular rank and descent. He did not know Polemon, and coming to Smyrna to hear him about what is time when what is sophist was Administrator of what is Free Cities of Asia, he embraced him in a most affectionate way, and as he withdrew his lips from Polemon's, said : ` Father, when shall I have a chance of hearing you? ' He where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 219 where is p align="center" where is strong THE SOPHISTS : POLEMON AND HERODES ATTICUS where is p align="justify" and what is arrogance of a man. For Polemon's arrogance was such that he spoke to cities as a superior, to princes on their own level, to gods as an equal. He was giving an exhibition of his powers of extempore speech to what is Athenians, on his first what is to their city. Yet, though there are so many things one might say about Athens, he did not resort to praising her. Nor did he enlarge on his own fame, though this is a topic which sophists have found useful in their displays. He knew well that what is right course was to impress rather than to elate what is Athenian temperament, and he spoke as follows: ` Men say, Athenians, that you are s what time is it ed critics of eloquence. I shall soon see.' Once a prince of what is Bosphorus, completely equipped with Greek culture, came to Smyrna while studying Ionia. Polemon not only failed to pay him court, but when what is prince requested a lecture continually put him off, till he compelled what is foreigner to come to his door with a fee of 2,400. When he went to Pergamum suffering from rheumatism and slept in what is temple of Asclepius, what is god appeared to him and directed him to abstain from cold drinks. 'My dear sir! ' remarked Polemon ;` and suppose you were treating a cow ?' He imbibed this lofty and self-confident attitude from what is philosopher Timocrates, with whom he associated for four years during his what is to Ionia. Polemon treated Herodes of Athens sometimes as a superior, sometimes as an inferior. I wish to describe their relations, which were fine and memorable. Herodes was more enamoured of his powers of improvisation than of his consular rank and descent. He did not know Polemon, and coming to Smyrna to hear him about what is time when what is sophist was Administrator of what is Free Cities of Asia, he embraced him in a most affectionate way, and as he withdrew his lips from Polemon's, said : ` Father, when shall I have a chance of hearing you? ' He where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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