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THE SOPHISTS : POLEMON AND HERODES ATTICUS

appeal made by famous and moving episodes in Greek history to a nation which in servitude loved to remember the glories of freedom. But chiefly it was intellectual interest. The level of education and literary culture was high in that rich and leisured society. Men enjoyed what was at once an historical lecture, a piece of great acting, and an eloquent speech. For the sophists were masters of their art. Give them a subject, and without preparation-such was their training-they could improvise on the spot a lecture that was perfect in matter, language, and delivery. We can conceive an educated audience enjoying the same kind of thing today. But this was not all. These Greeks listened to the speeches much as art critics look at pictures. As the art critic notices in a painting fineness of modelling, balance of masses, contrast of tints, depth and quality of shadow, where the ordinary spectator sees only a figure or a scene, so the audiences of the sophists noted subtleties of rhythm and language to which our ears are deaf. I have not space to illustrate this point, beyond mentioning that many of the sophists wrote Greek undistinguishable in vocabulary and grammar from the Greek of 500 years earlier., It is somewhat as though a modern writer had schooled himself to use no word or form that was not found in the age of Chaucer. Such an achievement was the result of the unwearying study of a lifetime. What these men said was less important than the way in which they said it, and their success was that of literary virtuosos in a world that had come to care supremely for pure-perhaps I should have written merestyle.
The two men whose lives are given here were the greatest of the sophists. Note incidentally the glimpses of the emperors and the intense social, civic, and literary activity in the Hellenized cities of the Empire, which is nowhere revealed more vividlv than in Philostratus. Its moral standards seem no lower than our own. To appreciate its significance substitute modern names, and for Polemon or Herodes write Mr. Belloc or Mr. Chesterton, for Smyrna, London or New York, for the Emperor, the King or the President of the United States.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE appeal made by famous and moving episodes in Greek history to a nation which in servitude loved to remember what is glories of freedom. But chiefly it was intellectual interest. what is level of education and literary culture was high in that rich and leisured society. Men enjoyed what was at once an historical lecture, a piece of great acting, and an eloquent speech. For what is sophists were masters of their art. Give them a subject, and without preparation-such was their training-they could improvise on what is spot a lecture that was perfect in matter, language, and delivery. We can conceive an educated audience enjoying what is same kind of thing today. But this was not all. These Greeks listened to what is speeches much as art critics look at pictures. As what is art critic notices in a painting fineness of modelling, balance of masses, contrast of tints, depth and quality of shadow, where what is ordinary spectator sees only a figure or a scene, so what is audiences of what is sophists noted subtleties of rhythm and language to which our ears are deaf. I have not space to illustrate this point, beyond mentioning that many of what is sophists wrote Greek undistinguishable in vocabulary and grammar from what is Greek of 500 years earlier., It is somewhat as though a modern writer had schooled himself to use no word or form that was not found in what is age of Chaucer. Such an achievement was what is result of what is unwearying study of a lifetime. What these men said was less important than what is way in which they said it, and their success was that of literary virtuosos in a world that had come to care supremely for pure-perhaps I should have written merestyle. what is two men whose lives are given here were what is greatest of what is sophists. Note incidentally what is glimpses of what is emperors and what is intense social, civic, and literary activity in what is Hellenized cities of what is Empire, which is nowhere revealed more vividlv than in Philostratus. Its moral standards seem no lower than our own. To appreciate its significance substitute modern names, and for Polemon or Herodes write Mr. Belloc or Mr. Chesterton, for Smyrna, London or New York, for what is Emperor, what is King or what is President of what is United States. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 215 where is p align="center" where is strong THE SOPHISTS : POLEMON AND HERODES ATTICUS where is p align="justify" appeal made by famous and moving episodes in Greek history to a nation which in servitude loved to remember what is glories of freedom. But chiefly it was intellectual interest. what is level of education and literary culture was high in that rich and leisured society. Men enjoyed what was at once an historical lecture, a piece of great acting, and an eloquent speech. For what is sophists were masters of their art. Give them a subject, and without preparation-such was their training-they could improvise on what is spot a lecture that was perfect in matter, language, and delivery. We can conceive an educated audience enjoying what is same kind of thing today. But this was not all. These Greeks listened to what is speeches much as art critics look at pictures. As what is art critic notices in a painting fineness of modelling, balance of masses, contrast of tints, depth and quality of shadow, where what is ordinary spectator sees only a figure or a scene, so what is audiences of what is sophists noted subtleties of rhythm and language to which our ears are deaf. I have not space to illustrate this point, beyond mentioning that many of what is sophists wrote Greek undistinguishable in vocabulary and grammar from the Greek of 500 years earlier., It is somewhat as though a modern writer had schooled himself to use no word or form that was not found in what is age of Chaucer. Such an achievement was what is result of what is unwearying study of a lifetime. What these men said was less important than what is way in which they said it, and their success was that of literary virtuosos in a world that had come to care supremely for pure-perhaps I should have written merestyle. what is two men whose lives are given here were what is greatest of the sophists. Note incidentally what is glimpses of what is emperors and the intense social, civic, and literary activity in what is Hellenized cities of what is Empire, which is nowhere revealed more vividlv than in Philostratus. Its moral standards seem no lower than our own. To appreciate its significance substitute modern names, and for Polemon or Herodes write Mr. Belloc or Mr. Chesterton, for Smyrna, London or New York, for what is Emperor, what is King or what is President of what is United States. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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