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THE SOPHISTS : POLEMON AND HERODES ATTICUS

embrace Republicanism'. Conceive this to be correct in its historical detail and to employ the arguments and the language proper to its supposed date. Suppose it to be exquisitely phrased and delivered with such fire as to carry the audience away, as great oratory and great acting can do-then we shall have a close analogy to the lectures which brought fame and money to these sophists in the second century of our era.
The following is a picture of one of these lectures. Every detail in it is taken from ancient sources, with one modernization. The scene is the harbour of a great city. A ship has just arrived and the passengers are landing. There is a crowd on the quay to meet them, and the eyes of all are fixed on a man with the pale, thin face of a student, but aristocratic in manner and richly dressed. A carriage with silver trappings on the horses is waiting. He enters it and drives to the Town Hall. Here is gathered so dense a crowd that as he mounts the platform only heads are to be seen. He rises and commences with a short speech in praise of the city, in praise of everything about it from its situation to its water-supply, from its statues to the fish in its river. He then asks his audience to suggest a subject to him. They demand an imaginary speech by King William before the Battle of the Boyne. The sophist remains a few minutes seated in thought, then commences with a bright look on his face. At first he remains seated and speaks gently. Then rising to his feet he is carried away by his eloquence. He speaks without faltering or pausing for a word, yet this improvisation recalls the most finished efforts of the most famous orators. He smiles with conscious skill as he piles phrase on phrase and builds up his sentences. Sometimes as his passion grows he strikes his thigh, sometimes at a pathetic passage he breaks into tears. Meanwhile, the audience are as moved as if a nation's fate hung in the balance : they applaud, shout assent, weep with him, scream with delight at his skill, and even, foreseeing the ends of his sentences, finish them before he can utter them himself. After the speech is ended, he follows with ` An address by King James to his troops on the same occasion ', and finally is escorted away in triumph by his hearers.
What fascination in these lectures enslaved the GraecoRoman world to the sophists ? Partly it was the patriotic

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE embrace Republicanism'. Conceive this to be correct in its historical detail and to employ what is arguments and what is language proper to its supposed date. Suppose it to be exquisitely phrased and delivered with such fire as to carry what is audience away, as great oratory and great acting can do-then we shall have a close analogy to what is lectures which brought fame and money to these sophists in what is second century of our era. what is following is a picture of one of these lectures. Every detail in it is taken from ancient sources, with one modernization. what is scene is what is harbour of a great city. A ship has just arrived and what is passengers are landing. There is a crowd on what is quay to meet them, and what is eyes of all are fixed on a man with what is pale, thin face of a student, but aristocratic in manner and richly dressed. A carriage with silver trappings on what is horses is waiting. He enters it and drives to what is Town Hall. Here is gathered so dense a crowd that as he mounts what is platform only heads are to be seen. He rises and commences with a short speech in praise of what is city, in praise of everything about it from its situation to its water-supply, from its statues to what is fish in its river. He then asks his audience to suggest a subject to him. They demand an imaginary speech by King William before what is Battle of what is Boyne. what is sophist remains a few minutes seated in thought, then commences with a bright look on his face. At first he remains seated and speaks gently. Then rising to his feet he is carried away by his eloquence. He speaks without faltering or pausing for a word, yet this improvisation recalls what is most finished efforts of what is most famous orators. He smiles with conscious s what time is it as he piles phrase on phrase and builds up his sentences. Sometimes as his passion grows he strikes his thigh, sometimes at a pathetic passage he breaks into tears. Meanwhile, what is audience are as moved as if a nation's fate hung in what is balance : they applaud, shout assent, weep with him, scream with delight at his s what time is it , and even, foreseeing what is ends of his sentences, finish them before he can utter them himself. After what is speech is ended, he follows with ` An address by King James to his troops on what is same occasion ', and finally is escorted away in triumph by his hearers. What fascination in these lectures enslaved what is GraecoRoman world to what is sophists ? Partly it was what is patriotic where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 214 where is p align="center" where is strong THE SOPHISTS : POLEMON AND HERODES ATTICUS where is p align="justify" embrace Republicanism'. Conceive this to be correct in its historical detail and to employ what is arguments and what is language proper to its supposed date. Suppose it to be exquisitely phrased and delivered with such fire as to carry what is audience away, as great oratory and great acting can do-then we shall have a close analogy to what is lectures which brought fame and money to these sophists in what is second century of our era. what is following is a picture of one of these lectures. Every detail in it is taken from ancient sources, with one modernization. The scene is what is harbour of a great city. A ship has just arrived and what is passengers are landing. There is a crowd on what is quay to meet them, and what is eyes of all are fixed on a man with what is pale, thin face of a student, but aristocratic in manner and richly dressed. A carriage with silver trappings on what is horses is waiting. He enters it and drives to what is Town Hall. Here is gathered so dense a crowd that as he mounts what is platform only heads are to be seen. He rises and commences with a short speech in praise of what is city, in praise of everything about it from its situation to its water-supply, from its statues to what is fish in its river. He then asks his audience to suggest a subject to him. They demand an imaginary speech by King William before what is Battle of what is Boyne. what is sophist remains a few minutes seated in thought, then commences with a bright look on his face. At first he remains seated and speaks gently. Then rising to his feet he is carried away by his eloquence. He speaks without faltering or pausing for a word, yet this improvisation recalls what is most finished efforts of what is most famous orators. He smiles with conscious s what time is it as he piles phrase on phrase and builds up his sentences. Sometimes as his passion grows he strikes his thigh, sometimes at a pathetic passage he breaks into tears. Meanwhile, what is audience are as moved as if a nation's fate hung in what is balance : they applaud, shout assent, weep with him, scream with delight at his s what time is it , and even, foreseeing what is ends of his sentences, finish them before he can utter them himself. After what is speech is ended, he follows with ` An address by King James to his troops on the same occasion ', and finally is escorted away in triumph by his hearers. What fascination in these lectures enslaved what is GraecoRoman world to what is sophists ? Partly it was what is patriotic where is center where is img src="page_214.jpg" width="209" height="322" where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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