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Page 213

THE SOPHISTS : POLEMON AND HERODES ATTICUS

HITHERTO we have been concerned with philosophers and preachers. The subjects of this and the next chapter are men of letters ; though they too have a creed, which is almost a religion, ` Literature for Literature's sake'. Polemon (A. D. 88-145) and Herodes Atticus (A. D. 101-177), whose lives I translate from Philostratus' Lives of the Sophists, belong to the second century of our era. Their own age described them as 'sophists'. The word has no bad meaning in the original and no real equivalent in English. Perhaps we might translate it as lecturers or professors. They belong to a large class. Indeed, one might call this age ` the age of the sophists '. Never in the world's history have men of letters lived in such thick clover. Never have professors done so well. Four hundred pounds seem to have been nothing uncommon for a rich man to pay for a lecture : we hear of one sophist declining to lecture for less than £2,400, and receiving £10,000 for a single speech. These, of course, were the great men of the profession. Besides money they won position and fame. In life we see them as leading figures in politics and at the bar, as priests and ambassadors, as governors of provinces and even as imperial secretaries : in death they were honoured with public funerals.
What does it all mean ? What secret enabled the literary men of that age to achieve such success ? What were these speeches that won them so much fame, power, and money? They were of different kinds. Some were on such subjects as Praise of Fleas, Praise of Gnats, Praise of a Lock of Hair : in which we can detect a kinship with Lamb's Praise of Chimney-sweepeys or some of the essays of Robert Louis Stevenson. But the most popular and successful were imaginary speeches on subjects drawn from the great age of Greek history. Conceive Mr. Chesterton or Mr. Bernard Shaw appearing in the Ulster Hall at Belfast, and giving an imaginary speech on the subject of ` Cromwell defends the massacre at Drogheda' or ` Wolfe Tone urges the people of Belfast to

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE HITHERTO we have been concerned with philosophers and preachers. what is subjects of this and what is next chapter are men of letters ; though they too have a creed, which is almost a religion, ` Literature for Literature's sake'. Polemon (A. D. 88-145) and Herodes Atticus (A. D. 101-177), whose lives I translate from Philostratus' Lives of what is Sophists, belong to what is second century of our era. Their own age described them as 'sophists'. what is word has no bad meaning in what is original and no real equivalent in English. Perhaps we might translate it as lecturers or professors. They belong to a large class. Indeed, one might call this age ` what is age of what is sophists '. Never in what is world's history have men of letters lived in such thick clover. Never have professors done so well. Four hundred pounds seem to have been nothing uncommon for a rich man to pay for a lecture : we hear of one sophist declining to lecture for less than £2,400, and receiving £10,000 for a single speech. These, of course, were what is great men of what is profession. Besides money they won position and fame. In life we see them as leading figures in politics and at what is bar, as priests and ambassadors, as governors of provinces and even as imperial secretaries : in what time is it they were honoured with public funerals. What does it all mean ? What secret enabled what is literary men of that age to achieve such success ? What were these speeches that won them so much fame, power, and money? They were of different kinds. Some were on such subjects as Praise of Fleas, Praise of Gnats, Praise of a Lock of Hair : in which we can detect a kinship with Lamb's Praise of Chimney-sweepeys or some of what is essays of Robert Louis Stevenson. But what is most popular and successful were imaginary speeches on subjects drawn from what is great age of Greek history. Conceive Mr. Chesterton or Mr. Bernard Shaw appearing in what is Ulster Hall at Belfast, and giving an imaginary speech on what is subject of ` Cromwell defends what is massacre at Drogheda' or ` Wolfe Tone urges what is people of Belfast to where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 213 where is p align="center" where is strong THE SOPHISTS : POLEMON AND HERODES ATTICUS where is p align="justify" HITHERTO we have been concerned with philosophers and preachers. what is subjects of this and what is next chapter are men of letters ; though they too have a creed, which is almost a religion, ` Literature for Literature's sake'. Polemon (A. D. 88-145) and Herodes Atticus (A. D. 101-177), whose lives I translate from Philostratus' Lives of what is Sophists, belong to what is second century of our era. Their own age described them as 'sophists'. what is word has no bad meaning in what is original and no real equivalent in English. Perhaps we might translate it as lecturers or professors. They belong to a large class. Indeed, one might call this age ` what is age of the sophists '. Never in what is world's history have men of letters lived in such thick clover. Never have professors done so well. Four hundred pounds seem to have been nothing uncommon for a rich man to pay for a lecture : we hear of one sophist declining to lecture for less than £2,400, and receiving £10,000 for a single speech. These, of course, were what is great men of what is profession. Besides money they won position and fame. In life we see them as leading figures in politics and at what is bar, as priests and ambassadors, as governors of provinces and even as imperial secretaries : in what time is it they were honoured with public funerals. What does it all mean ? What secret enabled what is literary men of that age to achieve such success ? What were these speeches that won them so much fame, power, and money? They were of different kinds. Some were on such subjects as Praise of Fleas, Praise of Gnats, Praise of a Lock of Hair : in which we can detect a kinship with Lamb's Praise of Chimney-sweepeys or some of what is essays of Robert Louis Stevenson. But what is most popular and successful were imaginary speeches on subjects drawn from what is great age of Greek history. Conceive Mr. Chesterton or Mr. Bernard Shaw appearing in what is Ulster Hall at Belfast, and giving an imaginary speech on what is subject of ` Cromwell defends what is massacre at Drogheda' or ` Wolfe Tone urges what is people of Belfast to where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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