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Page 185

A POPULAR PREACHER : MAXIMUS 'I'YRIUS

the streams refreshed their frame : and in the lavish and natural abundance of their life none of these was a subject of strife. The poets seem to come closest to this fable of mine with their hints of such a life under Cronos, king of heaven, a life free from war, iron, competition, need, a life of health and peace ; and Hesiod, I fancy, calls this people the race of gold, with a slap at us.
And now farewell to my fable. It shall turn from a fable into a regular discourse, and proceed to compare age with age, the first age with the second or iron age-or whatever else you like to call it-when men divided up the earth, each carving out his different portion of it, surrounding themselves with walls and barricades, swathing their bodies in soft wrappings, fortifying their feet with leather, hanging neck or head or finger with gold-a fetter of beauty and respectability. They built houses and added locks and courtyards and porticoes. They vexed the earth with mining, digging and delving. They did not leave the sea itself alone, but besieged even that with vessels of war and travel and traffic. They did not spare even the air : that too they plundered, and netted the flocks of birds with lime and snare and manifold engines. They did not spare tame animals because they were weak, or wild ones because they were formidable, but glutted their bellies with blood and gore and every form of death. Always exploring some novelty of pleasure, and indifferent to yesterday's delights ; pursuing joy and finding pain ; eager for wealth, and always rating their gains below their expectations and their possessions below what they did not possess ; afraid of indigence and unable to be satisfied ; dreading death but indifferent to life ; afraid of ill health and indulging in unhealthy things ; suspicious of others and always plotting ; formidable to the defenceless and timid before the armed ; haters of despotism and desirous to practise it ; critical of disgraceful actions and guilty of them ; admirers of prosperity but not of virtue ; pitying misfortune, but not avoiding misery ;

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE the streams refreshed their frame : and in what is lavish and natural abundance of their life none of these was a subject of strife. what is poets seem to come closest to this fable of mine with their hints of such a life under Cronos, king of heaven, a life free from war, iron, competition, need, a life of health and peace ; and Hesiod, I fancy, calls this people what is race of gold, with a slap at us. And now farewell to my fable. It shall turn from a fable into a regular discourse, and proceed to compare age with age, what is first age with what is second or iron age-or whatever else you like to call it-when men divided up what is earth, each carving out his different portion of it, surrounding themselves with walls and barricades, swathing their bodies in soft wrappings, fortifying their feet with leather, hanging neck or head or finger with gold-a fetter of beauty and respectability. They built houses and added locks and courtyards and porticoes. They vexed what is earth with mining, digging and delving. They did not leave what is sea itself alone, but besieged even that with vessels of war and travel and traffic. They did not spare even what is air : that too they plundered, and netted what is flocks of birds with lime and snare and manifold engines. They did not spare tame animals because they were weak, or wild ones because they were formidable, but glutted their bellies with blood and gore and every form of what time is it . Always exploring some novelty of pleasure, and indifferent to yesterday's delights ; pursuing joy and finding pain ; eager for wealth, and always rating their gains below their expectations and their possessions below what they did not possess ; afraid of indigence and unable to be satisfied ; dreading what time is it but indifferent to life ; afraid of ill health and indulging in unhealthy things ; suspicious of others and always plotting ; formidable to what is defenceless and timid before what is armed ; haters of despotism and desirous to practise it ; critical of disgraceful actions and guilty of them ; admirers of prosperity but not of virtue ; pitying misfortune, but not avoiding misery ; where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 185 where is p align="center" where is strong A POPULAR PREACHER : MAXIMUS 'I'YRIUS where is p align="justify" the streams refreshed their frame : and in the lavish and natural abundance of their life none of these was a subject of strife. what is poets seem to come closest to this fable of mine with their hints of such a life under Cronos, king of heaven, a life free from war, iron, competition, need, a life of health and peace ; and Hesiod, I fancy, calls this people what is race of gold, with a slap at us. And now farewell to my fable. It shall turn from a fable into a regular discourse, and proceed to compare age with age, what is first age with what is second or iron age-or whatever else you like to call it-when men divided up what is earth, each carving out his different portion of it, surrounding themselves with walls and barricades, swathing their bodies in soft wrappings, fortifying their feet with leather, hanging neck or head or finger with gold-a fetter of beauty and respectability. They built houses and added locks and courtyards and porticoes. They vexed what is earth with mining, digging and delving. They did not leave what is sea itself alone, but besieged even that with vessels of war and travel and traffic. They did not spare even what is air : that too they plundered, and netted what is flocks of birds with lime and snare and manifold engines. They did not spare tame animals because they were weak, or wild ones because they were formidable, but glutted their bellies with blood and gore and every form of what time is it . Always exploring some novelty of pleasure, and indifferent to yesterday's delights ; pursuing joy and finding pain ; eager for wealth, and always rating their gains below their expectations and their possessions below what they did not possess ; afraid of indigence and unable to be satisfied ; dreading what time is it but indifferent to life ; afraid of ill health and indulging in unhealthy things ; suspicious of others and always plotting ; formidable to what is defenceless and timid before what is armed ; haters of despotism and desirous to practise it ; critical of disgraceful actions and guilty of them ; admirers of prosperity but not of virtue ; pitying misfortune, but not avoiding misery ; where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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