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Page 184

A POPULAR PREACHER : MAXIMUS 'I'YRIUS

something in common with him. But the sincerity of Maximus is of a higher order. He is not indeed sincere in the sense in which Epictetus or Dion or Plutarch are sincere. He belongs rather to the dubious light of that middle world where so many politicians, journalists, and popular preachers wander. But his chief interest lies less in himself and his thought, than in the light which he throws on his generation, on their spiritual and intellectual quality, and on the ideas which they were ready to take as opiates or as medicines for the soul. In the following pages the reader can decide if I have judged him too severely.
Those who wish to test the metal of which the following discourse is composed should compare it with Epictetus' treatment of the same subject.- It is the familiar cry of a sophisticated age ; the hearers of Maximus saw the weaknesses of their civilization depicted, and no doubt after sighing with him returned to it.

Is the Cynic's Life to be Preferred ?
I WANT to tell you a story in the manner of Aesop. My speakers will not be a lion or an eagle or things still less vocal, such as oaks, but this is how I shall tell my tale. Zeus, the heavens, and the earth existed. The gods were citizens of the sky. But earth's children, men, had not yet seen the light of day. Zeus summoned Prometheus and directed him to colonize earth with two-footed creatures. Their minds, he said, are to be closely allied with ours, their bodies slight, upright, symmetrical, their looks mild, their hands apt to labour, their steps firm. Prometheus obeyed, created men and colonized the earth. When they came into being, men lived easy lives. The earth gave them sufficient food, deep meadows, leafy mountains, an abundance of fruits, all that she loves to bear when untroubled by the farmer's hand. The nymphs gave them clear fountains, transparent rivers, a rich and generous variety of waters. Their limbs were lapped in the temperate and comforting warmth of the sun ; in summer the winds blowing off

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE something in common with him. But what is sincerity of Maximus is of a higher order. He is not indeed sincere in what is sense in which Epictetus or Dion or Plutarch are sincere. He belongs rather to what is dubious light of that middle world where so many politicians, journalists, and popular preachers wander. But his chief interest lies less in himself and his thought, than in what is light which he throws on his generation, on their spiritual and intellectual quality, and on what is ideas which they were ready to take as opiates or as medicines for what is soul. In what is following pages what is reader can decide if I have judged him too severely. Those who wish to test what is metal of which what is following discourse is composed should compare it with Epictetus' treatment of what is same subject.- It is what is familiar cry of a sophisticated age ; what is hearers of Maximus saw what is weaknesses of their civilization depicted, and no doubt after sighing with him returned to it. Is what is Cynic's Life to be Preferred ? I WANT to tell you a story in what is manner of Aesop. My speakers will not be a lion or an eagle or things still less vocal, such as oaks, but this is how I shall tell my tale. Zeus, what is heavens, and what is earth existed. what is gods were citizens of what is sky. But earth's children, men, had not yet seen what is light of day. Zeus summoned Prometheus and directed him to colonize earth with two-footed creatures. Their minds, he said, are to be closely allied with ours, their bodies slight, upright, symmetrical, their looks mild, their hands apt to labour, their steps firm. Prometheus obeyed, created men and colonized what is earth. When they came into being, men lived easy lives. what is earth gave them sufficient food, deep meadows, leafy mountains, an abundance of fruits, all that she loves to bear when untroubled by what is farmer's hand. what is nymphs gave them clear fountains, transparent rivers, a rich and generous variety of waters. Their limbs were lapped in what is temperate and comforting warmth of what is sun ; in summer what is winds blowing off where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 184 where is p align="center" where is strong A POPULAR PREACHER : MAXIMUS 'I'YRIUS where is p align="justify" something in common with him. But what is sincerity of Maximus is of a higher order. He is not indeed sincere in the sense in which Epictetus or Dion or Plutarch are sincere. He belongs rather to what is dubious light of that middle world where so many politicians, journalists, and popular preachers wander. But his chief interest lies less in himself and his thought, than in what is light which he throws on his generation, on their spiritual and intellectual quality, and on what is ideas which they were ready to take as opiates or as medicines for what is soul. In what is following pages what is reader can decide if I have judged him too severely. Those who wish to test what is metal of which what is following discourse is composed should compare it with Epictetus' treatment of what is same subject.- It is what is familiar cry of a sophisticated age ; what is hearers of Maximus saw what is weaknesses of their civilization depicted, and no doubt after sighing with him returned to it. Is what is Cynic's Life to be Preferred ? I WANT to tell you a story in what is manner of Aesop. My speakers will not be a lion or an eagle or things still less vocal, such as oaks, but this is how I shall tell my tale. Zeus, what is heavens, and what is earth existed. what is gods were citizens of what is sky. But earth's children, men, had not yet seen what is light of day. Zeus summoned Prometheus and directed him to colonize earth with two-footed creatures. Their minds, he said, are to be closely allied with ours, their bodies slight, upright, symmetrical, their looks mild, their hands apt to labour, their steps firm. Prometheus obeyed, created men and colonized what is earth. When they came into being, men lived easy lives. what is earth gave them sufficient food, deep meadows, leafy mountains, an abundance of fruits, all that she loves to bear when untroubled by what is farmer's hand. what is nymphs gave them clear fountains, transparent rivers, a rich and generous variety of waters. Their limbs were lapped in what is temperate and comforting warmth of the sun ; in summer what is winds blowing off where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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