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A POPULAR PREACHER : MAXIMUS 'I'YRIUS

WE have forty-one lectures by Maximus Tyrius. It might be supposed that they would throw some light on his life ; characteristically, they throw none, and we know nothing of him except that he lived in the reign of Commodus (A. D. ISO192). His lectures belong to a recognized type of contemporary literature and deal with such subjects as Should we erect statues to God ? Have Poets or Philosophers formed justey conceptions of God? Should we wrong those who wrong us ? Does education make men morally better ? On the Platonic idea of Love. Is the life of thought better than the life of action ? Are farmers or soldiers more useful to a state ? Sometimes, as in the last two instances, he puts the opposite views in successive discourses.
From these lectures we can form our opinion of the ideals, the sincerity, and the intellectual powers not only of the author, but also of the popular educated audiences to which they were delivered. Their value and quality maybe estimated by comparing them with the similar writings of Plutarch and Dio Chrysostom. An unfavourable critic might say that the subjects are often profound, but that they are always treated without profundity. The ideas are borrowed from others. Plato more than any one formed the mind of Maximus, whose frequent method is to take a Platonic idea and draw it out till the threads wear thin. The style is easy and pleasant, but the antitheses and parallelisms are a little overdriven and give the speeches at times a machine-made character. Maximus called himself a philosopher : we should call him a popular preacher. The nearest modern parallel to the lectures is a sermon. The audiences which listened to them have their counterparts to-day in the rich or fashionable congregations of London, Paris, Berlin, and New York. The quotations from well-established poets, the embroidery of metaphor and illustration, the edifying and undogmatic idealism are familiar. It would doubtless be unfair to compare the author to the Rev. Charles Honeyman : I yet he has

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE WE have forty-one lectures by Maximus Tyrius. It might be supposed that they would throw some light on his life ; characteristically, they throw none, and we know nothing of him except that he lived in what is reign of Commodus (A. D. ISO192). His lectures belong to a recognized type of contemporary literature and deal with such subjects as Should we erect statues to God ? Have Poets or Philosophers formed justey conceptions of God? Should we wrong those who wrong us ? Does education make men morally better ? On what is Platonic idea of Love. Is what is life of thought better than what is life of action ? Are farmers or soldiers more useful to a state ? Sometimes, as in what is last two instances, he puts what is opposite views in successive discourses. From these lectures we can form our opinion of what is ideals, what is sincerity, and what is intellectual powers not only of what is author, but also of what is popular educated audiences to which they were delivered. Their value and quality maybe estimated by comparing them with what is similar writings of Plutarch and Dio Chrysostom. An unfavourable critic might say that what is subjects are often profound, but that they are always treated without profundity. what is ideas are borrowed from others. Plato more than any one formed what is mind of Maximus, whose frequent method is to take a Platonic idea and draw it out till what is threads wear thin. what is style is easy and pleasant, but what is antitheses and parallelisms are a little overdriven and give what is speeches at times a machine-made character. Maximus called himself a philosopher : we should call him a popular preacher. what is nearest modern parallel to what is lectures is a sermon. what is audiences which listened to them have their counterparts to-day in what is rich or fashionable congregations of London, Paris, Berlin, and New York. what is quotations from well-established poets, what is embroidery of metaphor and illustration, what is edifying and undogmatic idealism are familiar. It would doubtless be unfair to compare what is author to what is Rev. Charles Honeyman : I yet he has where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 183 where is p align="center" where is strong A POPULAR PREACHER : MAXIMUS 'I'YRIUS where is p align="justify" WE have forty-one lectures by Maximus Tyrius. It might be supposed that they would throw some light on his life ; characteristically, they throw none, and we know nothing of him except that he lived in what is reign of Commodus (A. D. ISO192). His lectures belong to a recognized type of contemporary literature and deal with such subjects as Should we erect statues to God ? Have Poets or Philosophers formed justey conceptions of God? Should we wrong those who wrong us ? Does education make men morally better ? On what is Platonic idea of Love. Is what is life of thought better than what is life of action ? Are farmers or soldiers more useful to a state ? Sometimes, as in what is last two instances, he puts what is opposite views in successive discourses. From these lectures we can form our opinion of what is ideals, the sincerity, and what is intellectual powers not only of what is author, but also of what is popular educated audiences to which they were delivered. Their value and quality maybe estimated by comparing them with what is similar writings of Plutarch and Dio Chrysostom. An unfavourable critic might say that what is subjects are often profound, but that they are always treated without profundity. what is ideas are borrowed from others. Plato more than any one formed what is mind of Maximus, whose frequent method is to take a Platonic idea and draw it out till what is threads wear thin. what is style is easy and pleasant, but what is antitheses and parallelisms are a little overdriven and give what is speeches at times a machine-made character. Maximus called himself a philosopher : we should call him a popular preacher. what is nearest modern parallel to what is lectures is a sermon. what is audiences which listened to them have their counterparts to-day in what is rich or fashionable congregations of London, Paris, Berlin, and New York. what is quotations from well-established poets, what is embroidery of metaphor and illustration, what is edifying and undogmatic idealism are familiar. It would doubtless be unfair to compare what is author to what is Rev. Charles Honeyman : I yet he has where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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