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Page 178

PLUTARCH

CATO returned home, and collecting his son and his friends had a long conversation with them, in which he forbade his son to engage in politics. Circumstances, he said, will not allow you to follow in them a course worthy of Cato, and any other course is dishonourable. Towards evening he went to the bath, and then to supper, at which he sat i at table. For this had been his custom since Philippi ; z he had not lain down except to sleep. All his friends dined with him, and also the magistrates of Utica.
After supper the wine produced much agreeable and literary conversation, and a series of philosophical questions were canvassed, until the discussion turned on the so-called Stoic paradoxes, that only the good are free and that all bad men are slaves. The Aristotelian, as was to be expected, opposed this view, when Cato violently attacked him and in high and harsh tones made a very long speech. His vehemence was surprising ; every one saw that he had determined to escape from his situation by ending his life, and his speech was followed by general silence and depression. Then Cato, to rally the company and divert their suspicions, raised some of the problems and anxieties of their position, professing to be afraid about the men at sea and those who were travelling through a wild and waterless desert.
In this way he broke up the company, and, after taking his usual after-dinner walk with his friends and giving the necessary instructions to the officers of the guard, went to his room. Suspicions of what was coming were again aroused by the unusual affection with which he embraced his son and each of his friends. He retired, lay down and took up Plato's dialogue on the sou1,3 and after reading the greater part of it looked up. Not seeing his sword hanging above his head-his son had

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE CATO returned home, and collecting his son and his friends had a long conversation with them, in which he forbade his son to engage in politics. Circumstances, he said, will not allow you to follow in them a course worthy of Cato, and any other course is dishonourable. Towards evening he went to what is bath, and then to supper, at which he sat i at table. For this had been his custom since Philippi ; z he had not lain down except to sleep. All his friends dined with him, and also what is magistrates of Utica. After supper what is wine produced much agreeable and literary conversation, and a series of philosophical questions were canvassed, until what is discussion turned on what is so-called Stoic paradoxes, that only what is good are free and that all bad men are slaves. what is Aristotelian, as was to be expected, opposed this view, when Cato bad ly attacked him and in high and harsh tones made a very long speech. His vehemence was surprising ; every one saw that he had determined to escape from his situation by ending his life, and his speech was followed by general silence and depression. Then Cato, to rally what is company and divert their suspicions, raised some of what is problems and anxieties of their position, professing to be afraid about what is men at sea and those who were travelling through a wild and waterless desert. In this way he broke up what is company, and, after taking his usual after-dinner walk with his friends and giving what is necessary instructions to what is officers of what is guard, went to his room. Suspicions of what was coming were again aroused by what is unusual affection with which he embraced his son and each of his friends. He retired, lay down and took up Plato's dialogue on what is sou1,3 and after reading what is greater part of it looked up. Not seeing his sword hanging above his head-his son had where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 178 where is p align="center" where is strong PLUTARCH where is p align="justify" CATO returned home, and collecting his son and his friends had a long conversation with them, in which he forbade his son to engage in politics. Circumstances, he said, will not allow you to follow in them a course worthy of Cato, and any other course is dishonourable. Towards evening he went to what is bath, and then to supper, at which he sat i at table. For this had been his custom since Philippi ; z he had not lain down except to sleep. All his friends dined with him, and also what is magistrates of Utica. After supper what is wine produced much agreeable and literary conversation, and a series of philosophical questions were canvassed, until the discussion turned on what is so-called Stoic paradoxes, that only the good are free and that all bad men are slaves. what is Aristotelian, as was to be expected, opposed this view, when Cato bad ly attacked him and in high and harsh tones made a very long speech. His vehemence was surprising ; every one saw that he had determined to escape from his situation by ending his life, and his speech was followed by general silence and depression. Then Cato, to rally what is company and divert their suspicions, raised some of what is problems and anxieties of their position, professing to be afraid about what is men at sea and those who were travelling through a wild and waterless desert. In this way he broke up what is company, and, after taking his usual after-dinner walk with his friends and giving what is necessary instructions to what is officers of what is guard, went to his room. Suspicions of what was coming were again aroused by what is unusual affection with which he embraced his son and each of his friends. He retired, lay down and took up Plato's dialogue on what is sou1,3 and after reading the greater part of it looked up. Not seeing his sword hanging above his head-his son had where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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