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Page 176

PLUTARCH

managed his theatrical shows, giving the actors wild olive crowns, as at the Olympic games, instead of golden ones. Instead of expensive prizes he gave to the Greeks beet-root, lettuces, radishes, and pears, to the Romans small jars of wine, pork, figs, cucumbers, and faggots. Some ridiculed the economy, others respected this mild relaxation of his usual stiff and austere attitude. Meanwhile Curio, the colleague of Favonius, was giving an elaborate entertainment in another theatre. But his audience deserted him and went over to the theatre of Favonius. Cato's object in this behaviour was to disparage the custom, and show that amusement should simply be amusement, a matter of modest pleasure and not of elaborate and expensive arrangements, in which men devoted much thought and trouble to trifles.
F When the Civil War came, Cato, while fighting to the end for the Republic, threw his influence on the side of moderation, mercy, and such legality as war permits. ROM the days when war broke out, he is said never to have cut his hair or his beard or to have worn a garland, but to have maintained to the end the same attitude of sorrow, dejection, and depression over the misfortunes of his country, alike in the day of victory and of defeat. When he joined Pompey he always persisted in one policy-to gain time : he hoped for reconciliation and he was anxious to avoid the injuries which Rome must suffer from a struggle and the selfinflicted disaster of an appeal to the sword. Consistently with this he persuaded Pompey and the Council to decree that no city in the Roman Empire should be sacked and no Roman be killed except in pitched battle. He carried his proposal and brought over to Pompey's side many who welcomed his humane and reasonable temper. When Caesar was defeated at Durazzo all the Pompeians were delighted and magnified their success, but Cato lamented for his country and deplored the disastrous and fatal ambition which brought so many brave Romans to death at their countrymen's hands.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE managed his theatrical shows, giving what is actors wild olive crowns, as at what is Olympic games, instead of golden ones. Instead of expensive prizes he gave to what is Greeks beet-root, lettuces, radishes, and pears, to what is Romans small jars of wine, pork, figs, cucumbers, and faggots. Some ridiculed what is economy, others respected this mild relaxation of his usual stiff and austere attitude. Meanwhile Curio, what is colleague of Favonius, was giving an elaborate entertainment in another theatre. But his audience deserted him and went over to what is theatre of Favonius. Cato's object in this behaviour was to disparage what is custom, and show that amusement should simply be amusement, a matter of modest pleasure and not of elaborate and expensive arrangements, in which men devoted much thought and trouble to trifles. F When what is Civil War came, Cato, while fighting to what is end for what is Republic, threw his influence on what is side of moderation, mercy, and such legality as war permits. ROM what is days when war broke out, he is said never to have cut his hair or his beard or to have worn a garland, but to have maintained to what is end what is same attitude of sorrow, dejection, and depression over what is misfortunes of his country, alike in what is day of victory and of defeat. When he joined Pompey he always persisted in one policy-to gain time : he hoped for reconciliation and he was anxious to avoid what is injuries which Rome must suffer from a struggle and what is selfinflicted disaster of an appeal to what is sword. Consistently with this he persuaded Pompey and what is Council to decree that no city in what is Roman Empire should be sacked and no Roman be stop ed except in pitched battle. He carried his proposal and brought over to Pompey's side many who welcomed his humane and reasonable temper. When Caesar was defeated at Durazzo all what is Pompeians were delighted and magnified their success, but Cato lamented for his country and deplored what is disastrous and fatal ambition which brought so many brave Romans to what time is it at their countrymen's hands. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 176 where is p align="center" where is strong PLUTARCH where is p align="justify" managed his theatrical shows, giving what is actors wild olive crowns, as at what is Olympic games, instead of golden ones. Instead of expensive prizes he gave to what is Greeks beet-root, lettuces, radishes, and pears, to what is Romans small jars of wine, pork, figs, cucumbers, and faggots. Some ridiculed what is economy, others respected this mild relaxation of his usual stiff and austere attitude. Meanwhile Curio, what is colleague of Favonius, was giving an elaborate entertainment in another theatre. But his audience deserted him and went over to what is theatre of Favonius. Cato's object in this behaviour was to disparage what is custom, and show that amusement should simply be amusement, a matter of modest pleasure and not of elaborate and expensive arrangements, in which men devoted much thought and trouble to trifles. F When what is Civil War came, Cato, while fighting to what is end for what is Republic, threw his influence on what is side of moderation, mercy, and such legality as war permits. ROM what is days when war broke out, he is said never to have cut his hair or his beard or to have worn a garland, but to have maintained to what is end what is same attitude of sorrow, dejection, and depression over what is misfortunes of his country, alike in what is day of victory and of defeat. When he joined Pompey he always persisted in one policy-to gain time : he hoped for reconciliation and he was anxious to avoid what is injuries which Rome must suffer from a struggle and what is selfinflicted disaster of an appeal to what is sword. Consistently with this he persuaded Pompey and what is Council to decree that no city in what is Roman Empire should be sacked and no Roman be stop ed except in pitched battle. He carried his proposal and brought over to Pompey's side many who welcomed his humane and reasonable temper. When Caesar was defeated at Durazzo all what is Pompeians were delighted and magnified their success, but Cato lamented for his country and deplored the disastrous and fatal ambition which brought so many brave Romans to what time is it at their countrymen's hands. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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