Books > Old Books > The Mission Of Greece (1928)


Page 175

PLUTARCH

Rome. When Cicero thanked him Cato said that he must thank Rome, implying that his actions and policy were ruled by public interest.
In consequence Cato gained a great reputation, so that it became a common proverb to say about incredible or unlikely things, that one could not believe it, even if Cato said so.
The people at that time were corrupted by bribes from those who were anxious for office, and made the sale of votes a regular trade. Cato wished completely to eradicate this disease from the state, and persuaded the Senate to pass a resolution that those who were elected to office, even if no one accused them, should be compelled to come into court and give an account of their actions on oath. This was very unpopular with candidates for office, and still more so with the masses who took bribes. One morning when Cato came forward to the tribune they attacked him in a body with shouts, abuse, and missiles. Every one fled and Cato, pushed and jostled by the mob, had difficulty in reaching the platform. He took his stand there, and by the boldness and confidence of his looks mastered the tumult and silenced the shouting. He made a suitable speech, which was listened to quietly, and completely stopped the riot. When the Senate commended him he said : I on the contrary cannot commend you for abandoning the consul and failing to help him in his danger. Meanwhile the candidates were in great perplexity. Each was afraid to give bribes, but equally afraid that they would fail to be elected, if the other candidates did so. So they met and determined each to deposit ~i,ooo, and then to canvass fairly and honestly, on the understanding that any one who broke the compact and gave bribes should lose his deposit. After making this agreement they chose Cato to hold the stakes and arbitrate, and deposited the money with him.
Among his friends and admirers was M. Favonius, who was elected aedile.= Cato assisted him in his official duties and

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Rome. When Cicero thanked him Cato said that he must thank Rome, implying that his actions and policy were ruled by public interest. In consequence Cato gained a great reputation, so that it became a common proverb to say about incredible or unlikely things, that one could not believe it, even if Cato said so. what is people at that time were corrupted by bribes from those who were anxious for office, and made what is sale of votes a regular trade. Cato wished completely to eradicate this disease from what is state, and persuaded what is Senate to pass a resolution that those who were elected to office, even if no one accused them, should be compelled to come into court and give an account of their actions on oath. This was very unpopular with candidates for office, and still more so with what is masses who took bribes. One morning when Cato came forward to what is tribune they attacked him in a body with shouts, abuse, and missiles. Every one fled and Cato, pushed and jostled by what is mob, had difficulty in reaching what is platform. He took his stand there, and by what is boldness and confidence of his looks mastered what is tumult and silenced what is shouting. He made a suitable speech, which was listened to quietly, and completely stopped what is riot. When what is Senate commended him he said : I on what is contrary cannot commend you for abandoning what is consul and failing to help him in his danger. Meanwhile what is candidates were in great perplexity. Each was afraid to give bribes, but equally afraid that they would fail to be elected, if what is other candidates did so. So they met and determined each to deposit ~i,ooo, and then to canvass fairly and honestly, on what is understanding that any one who broke what is compact and gave bribes should lose his deposit. After making this agreement they chose Cato to hold what is stakes and arbitrate, and deposited what is money with him. Among his friends and admirers was M. Favonius, who was elected aedile.= Cato assisted him in his official duties and where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 175 where is p align="center" where is strong PLUTARCH where is p align="justify" Rome. When Cicero thanked him Cato said that he must thank Rome, implying that his actions and policy were ruled by public interest. In consequence Cato gained a great reputation, so that it became a common proverb to say about incredible or unlikely things, that one could not believe it, even if Cato said so. what is people at that time were corrupted by bribes from those who were anxious for office, and made what is sale of votes a regular trade. Cato wished completely to eradicate this disease from what is state, and persuaded what is Senate to pass a resolution that those who were elected to office, even if no one accused them, should be compelled to come into court and give an account of their actions on oath. This was very unpopular with candidates for office, and still more so with what is masses who took bribes. One morning when Cato came forward to what is tribune they attacked him in a body with shouts, abuse, and missiles. Every one fled and Cato, pushed and jostled by what is mob, had difficulty in reaching what is platform. He took his stand there, and by what is boldness and confidence of his looks mastered what is tumult and silenced what is shouting. He made a suitable speech, which was listened to quietly, and completely stopped what is riot. When what is Senate commended him he said : I on what is contrary cannot commend you for abandoning what is consul and failing to help him in his danger. Meanwhile what is candidates were in great perplexity. Each was afraid to give bribes, but equally afraid that they would fail to be elected, if what is other candidates did so. So they met and determined each to deposit ~i,ooo, and then to canvass fairly and honestly, on what is understanding that any one who broke what is compact and gave bribes should lose his deposit. After making this agreement they chose Cato to hold what is stakes and arbitrate, and deposited what is money with him. Among his friends and admirers was M. Favonius, who was elected aedile.= Cato assisted him in his official duties and where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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