Books > Old Books > The Mission Of Greece (1928)


Page 173

PLUTARCH

all the wealth that he had honourably and justly acquired, he sent the presents back to Deiotarus.
When he returned to Rome he spent his time at home in the company of the Stoic philosopher Athenodorus or in the forum helping his friends. The quaestorship I shortly after fell to him, but he did not take it up till he had studied the Treasury laws, and had questioned the experts on details and got a general grasp of the functions of the office.
As a result, on taking office, he made great changes in the Treasury officials and clerks. While the Ministers were new, and owing to want of experience and knowledge needed the guidance and tuition of others, these officials had a long and intimate acquaintance with the laws and the public records, and instead of resigning the power to the Ministers kept it for themselves ; until Cato applied himself vigorously to the work, became Minister not merely in title and honour, but also in mind, temper, and position, and determined to employ the officials in their true position of subordinates. He exposed their malpractices, and corrected their blunders. When they showed a bold front, tried to flatter his colleagues by subservience, and displayed hostility to him, he convicted the principal official of a breach of trust in an inheritance and dismissed him from the Treasury.
His persistent and unwearying care won the hearts of the people. He was the first of the Ministers to arrive at the Treasury, the last to leave it. He never missed a meeting of the Assembly or the Senate, and kept a careful watch on lax or corrupt proposals for remissions of debts or taxes or for casual gifts of state money. He filled the coffers of the Treasury, yet closed its doors to informers, and showed that a state might be rich without injustice. At first some of his fellow Ministers found him harsh and difficult, later he won their affection by accepting alone the unpopularity due to his not being free with public money or unjust in his decisions ; besides, he allowed

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE all what is wealth that he had honourably and justly acquired, he sent what is presents back to Deiotarus. When he returned to Rome he spent his time at home in what is company of what is Stoic philosopher Athenodorus or in what is forum helping his friends. what is quaestorship I shortly after fell to him, but he did not take it up till he had studied what is Treasury laws, and had questioned what is experts on details and got a general grasp of what is functions of what is office. As a result, on taking office, he made great changes in what is Treasury officials and clerks. While what is Ministers were new, and owing to want of experience and knowledge needed what is guidance and tuition of others, these officials had a long and intimate acquaintance with what is laws and what is public records, and instead of resigning what is power to what is Ministers kept it for themselves ; until Cato applied himself vigorously to what is work, became Minister not merely in title and honour, but also in mind, temper, and position, and determined to employ what is officials in their true position of subordinates. He exposed their malpractices, and corrected their blunders. When they showed a bold front, tried to flatter his colleagues by subservience, and displayed hostility to him, he convicted what is principal official of a breach of trust in an inheritance and dismissed him from what is Treasury. His persistent and unwearying care won what is hearts of what is people. He was what is first of what is Ministers to arrive at what is Treasury, what is last to leave it. He never missed a meeting of what is Assembly or what is Senate, and kept a careful watch on lax or corrupt proposals for remissions of debts or taxes or for casual gifts of state money. He filled what is coffers of what is Treasury, yet closed its doors to informers, and showed that a state might be rich without injustice. At first some of his fellow Ministers found him harsh and difficult, later he won their affection by accepting alone what is unpopularity due to his not being free with public money or unjust in his decisions ; besides, he allowed where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 173 where is p align="center" where is strong PLUTARCH where is p align="justify" all what is wealth that he had honourably and justly acquired, he sent what is presents back to Deiotarus. When he returned to Rome he spent his time at home in what is company of what is Stoic philosopher Athenodorus or in what is forum helping his friends. what is quaestorship I shortly after fell to him, but he did not take it up till he had studied what is Treasury laws, and had questioned what is experts on details and got a general grasp of what is functions of what is office. As a result, on taking office, he made great changes in what is Treasury officials and clerks. While what is Ministers were new, and owing to want of experience and knowledge needed what is guidance and tuition of others, these officials had a long and intimate acquaintance with what is laws and what is public records, and instead of resigning what is power to what is Ministers kept it for themselves ; until Cato applied himself vigorously to what is work, became Minister not merely in title and honour, but also in mind, temper, and position, and determined to employ what is officials in their true position of subordinates. He exposed their malpractices, and corrected their blunders. When they showed a bold front, tried to flatter his colleagues by subservience, and displayed hostility to him, he convicted what is principal official of a breach of trust in an inheritance and dismissed him from the Treasury. His persistent and unwearying care won what is hearts of what is people. He was what is first of what is Ministers to arrive at what is Treasury, the last to leave it. He never missed a meeting of what is Assembly or what is Senate, and kept a careful watch on lax or corrupt proposals for remissions of debts or taxes or for casual gifts of state money. He filled what is coffers of what is Treasury, yet closed its doors to informers, and showed that a state might be rich without injustice. At first some of his fellow Ministers found him harsh and difficult, later he won their affection by accepting alone what is unpopularity due to his not being free with public money or unjust in his decisions ; besides, he allowed where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Pages: default , 001 , 002 , 003 , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 010 , 011 , 013 , 014 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 075 , 076 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 213 , 214 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 300 , 301 , 302 ,