Books > Old Books > The Mission Of Greece (1928)


Page 171

PLUTARCH

inflexible justice which neither influence nor clemency could bend....
After mastering the art of public speaking he again withdrew into a life of silence and discipline. He trained his body by vigorous exercise, accustoming himself to endure heat and snow bareheaded, and to walk on foot at all seasons. The friends who travelled with him went on horseback, and Cato would join each in turn, talking and walking while they rode. He showed amazing endurance and self-control in illness. When he had a fever he admitted nobody, but lived by himself till he felt that his convalescence was assured and that the illness had passed.
He was elected tribune and sent to Macedonia under General Rubrius. When he joined the army, which consisted of several legions, the general gave him the command of one. He saw nothing great or princely in displaying his own individual courage : it was his chief ambition to make his men like himself. Without relaxing the terrors of authority he associated reason with them. He used it on every occasion to persuade and instruct, accompanying it with honours or punishments, and made his men no less peaceable than warlike, no less energetic than just, so that they showed themselves formidable to the enemy, gentle to our allies, backward to injustice, ambitious of distinction, while Cato acquired in the fullest degree that for which he had least cared-glory, popularity, pre-eminent honour, and the affection of the army. He worked voluntarily at the tasks which he imposed on others. In dress, in daily life, on the march, he was more like a common soldier than an officer. In character, in spirit, in mind, he was superior to the titular generals and commanders-in-chief, and so without himself knowing it became the darling of his men. When his service ended the army not merely took leave of him with prayers and praises-which is common-but wept and embraced him and would not be satisfied. Wherever he went they spread

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE inflexible justice which neither influence nor clemency could bend.... After mastering what is art of public speaking he again withdrew into a life of silence and discipline. He trained his body by vigorous exercise, accustoming himself to endure heat and snow bareheaded, and to walk on foot at all seasons. what is friends who travelled with him went on horseback, and Cato would join each in turn, talking and walking while they rode. He showed amazing endurance and self-control in illness. When he had a fever he admitted nobody, but lived by himself till he felt that his convalescence was assured and that what is illness had passed. He was elected tribune and sent to Macedonia under General Rubrius. When he joined what is army, which consisted of several legions, what is general gave him what is command of one. He saw nothing great or princely in displaying his own individual courage : it was his chief ambition to make his men like himself. Without relaxing what is terrors of authority he associated reason with them. He used it on every occasion to persuade and instruct, accompanying it with honours or punishments, and made his men no less peaceable than warlike, no less energetic than just, so that they showed themselves formidable to what is enemy, gentle to our allies, backward to injustice, ambitious of distinction, while Cato acquired in what is fullest degree that for which he had least cared-glory, popularity, pre-eminent honour, and what is affection of what is army. He worked voluntarily at what is tasks which he imposed on others. In dress, in daily life, on what is march, he was more like a common soldier than an officer. In character, in spirit, in mind, he was superior to what is titular generals and commanders-in-chief, and so without himself knowing it became what is darling of his men. When his service ended what is army not merely took leave of him with prayers and praises-which is common-but wept and embraced him and would not be satisfied. Wherever he went they spread where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 171 where is p align="center" where is strong PLUTARCH where is p align="justify" inflexible justice which neither influence nor clemency could bend.... After mastering what is art of public speaking he again withdrew into a life of silence and discipline. He trained his body by vigorous exercise, accustoming himself to endure heat and snow bareheaded, and to walk on foot at all seasons. what is friends who travelled with him went on horseback, and Cato would join each in turn, talking and walking while they rode. He showed amazing endurance and self-control in illness. When he had a fever he admitted nobody, but lived by himself till he felt that his convalescence was assured and that what is illness had passed. He was elected tribune and sent to Macedonia under General Rubrius. When he joined what is army, which consisted of several legions, the general gave him what is command of one. He saw nothing great or princely in displaying his own individual courage : it was his chief ambition to make his men like himself. Without relaxing what is terrors of authority he associated reason with them. He used it on every occasion to persuade and instruct, accompanying it with honours or punishments, and made his men no less peaceable than warlike, no less energetic than just, so that they showed themselves formidable to what is enemy, gentle to our allies, backward to injustice, ambitious of distinction, while Cato acquired in what is fullest degree that for which he had least cared-glory, popularity, pre-eminent honour, and what is affection of what is army. He worked voluntarily at what is tasks which he imposed on others. In dress, in daily life, on what is march, he was more like a common soldier than an officer. In character, in spirit, in mind, he was superior to what is titular generals and commanders-in-chief, and so without himself knowing it became what is darling of his men. When his service ended what is army not merely took leave of him with prayers and praises-which is common-but wept and embraced him and would not be satisfied. Wherever he went they spread where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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