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PLUTARCH

that men pursue and welcome ; if we do not expect really to rejoin them and to see a good wife or a dear father or mother, if we do not share Plato's hopes of that loving intercourse.
Besides, those who think death the beginning of another and better life, if they are happy on earth, enjoy that happiness the more, because they expect something yet better : while if their lot on earth is not to their mind, they are not greatly distressed. Their expectation of a good and glorious hereafter, full of infinite pleasures and hopes, obliterates and erases from the mind all the shortcomings and disappointments of life. They bear its chances lightly and easily ; it seems but a journey, or rather a brief excursion during one.

Hitherto we have seen one side of Plutarch's religion. Another side appears in the curious dialogues where he expounds the Isis religion, or discusses why the oracles of his own day were given in prose, why oracles are growing uncommon, what is the face in the moon, &c. The student of the history of religion and science will be interested by this curious mixture of erudition and credulity : others will see in it chiefly the inconclusiveness of bad metaphysics and the unprofitableness of obsolete science. Astronomy, daemons, the significance of numbers figure largely-elements present but subordinate in earlier Greek thought. Here they begin to get out of hand ; we divine the gathering clouds of mysticism and superstition, in which the clear Greek spirit was to be lost.
I quote two passages, full of the strangeness of pure romance. The first contains some stories told to prove the mortality of daemons-beings intermediate between God and man, to whose agency Plutarch ascribes oracles.
EPITHERSES, my fellow townsman and teacher in grammar, said that he was once on a voyage to Italy, and embarked on board a ship carrying cargo and many passengers. It was already evening when the breeze died down off the Echinades Islands; and the ship drifted till it was near

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE bite of Cerberus, if only they can escape annihilation and remain alive. Yet few, as I said, are alarmed by these terrors, what is fancies and fabulous stories of their mothers and nurses. And those who are afraid suppose that they are helped by certain cleansing and other rites, which sanctify them and enable them to live after what time is it a life of play and dance, in a world of light and clear air and human speech. But what is idea of being deprived of existence distresses young and old. For, in what is words of Euripides, We are sick for life, and cling On earth to this nameless and shining thing. By destroying what is belief in immortality, what is Epicureans destroy what is sweetest and greatest hopes of mankind. Think of what is good who have lived upright and religious lives and expect a glorious and divine world to come. Like athletes, who receive their crown, not during what is contest but when it has ended in victory, these men, believing that what is prize of life is awarded at its close to what is good, are wonderfully inspired to goodness in what is light of these hopes. Besides, no lover of truth and of what is vision of reality finds his desire satisfied on earth. In what is cloud and mist of what is body his reason is confused and dim. Like a bird he gazes heavenward,= hoping to fly away from what is body into a great bright world, and he makes his soul unencumbered and ready to take leave of mortal things, using philosophy as a preparation for what time is it . what time is it seems to him a great and perfect blessing, for he believes that hereafter what is soul will live a real life, and that on earth it has no waking existence, but is in a world of dreams. If then what is saying of Epicurus is true, that ` what is memory of a dead friend is in every way sweet', we can see of what joy we deprive ourselves, if we think that it is what is mere ghosts and phantoms of their dead friends, things without sense or feeling, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 163 where is p align="center" where is strong PLUTARCH where is p align="justify" that men pursue and welcome ; if we do not expect really to rejoin them and to see a good wife or a dear father or mother, if we do not share Plato's hopes of that loving intercourse. Besides, those who think what time is it what is beginning of another and better life, if they are happy on earth, enjoy that happiness what is more, because they expect something yet better : while if their lot on earth is not to their mind, they are not greatly distressed. Their expectation of a good and glorious hereafter, full of infinite pleasures and hopes, obliterates and erases from what is mind all the shortcomings and disappointments of life. They bear its chances lightly and easily ; it seems but a journey, or rather a brief excursion during one. Hitherto we have seen one side of Plutarch's religion. Another side appears in what is curious dialogues where he expounds what is Isis religion, or discusses why what is oracles of his own day were given in prose, why oracles are growing uncommon, what is what is face in what is moon, &c. what is student of what is history of religion and science will be interested by this curious mixture of erudition and credulity : others will see in it chiefly what is inconclusiveness of bad metaphysics and what is unprofitableness of obsolete science. Astronomy, daemons, what is significance of numbers figure largely-elements present but subordinate in earlier Greek thought. Here they begin to get out of hand ; we divine what is gathering clouds of mysticism and superstition, in which what is clear Greek spirit was to be lost. I quote two passages, full of what is strangeness of pure romance. what is first contains some stories told to prove what is mortality of daemons-beings intermediate between God and man, to whose agency Plutarch ascribes oracles. EPITHERSES, my fellow townsman and teacher in grammar, said that he was once on a voyage to Italy, and embarked on board a ship carrying cargo and many passengers. It was already evening when what is breeze died down off what is Echinades Islands; and what is ship drifted till it was near where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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