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Page 156

PLUTARCH

moon's orbit, in the sun's motions round the earth, 'artificers of night and day', in the way animals live or crops are 'produced. It is the ridiculous acts and feelings of superstition, its phrases, motions, quackery, magic, revolutions, drummings, its impure purifications and foul cleansings, its savage and lawless punishments and revilements in temples-it is these things which cause some men to say that it is better that gods should not exist, if they accept and enjoy such worship, if they are so outrageous, petty, and easy to offend. Would it not have been better for the Gauls and Scythians to have had no notion or idea or account of the gods, than to suppose that gods existed who delighted in the blood of slaughtered human beings, and thought this the most perfect rite of sacrifice ?
Let us then avoid superstition, but do it without injury or danger to ourselves. Let us not be like people who, in carelessly and thoughtlessly escaping from a fire or an attack by brigands or wild animals, fall into a trackless country full of pits and precipices : as some, in the attempt to escape superstition, fall into a rough and iron atheism, and overleap religion, which lies between.
Plutarch hates superstition as strongly as did the Epicureans. But, unlike them, he did not empty out the baby with the bath. In the following passage he attacks the Epicurean scheme in which God was banished from the world and immortality discredited. He argues that even the religion of the average man, with all its weaknesses, is better than none. Still more is this true of the highest forms of religion, in which love casts out fear. Plutarch then contests the view that it is an advantage to disbelieve in a future life.
IT is better that there should be an element of awe and fear mingled and present with the belief in God, than that, in our efforts to avoid this, we should leave ourselves neither hope nor gratitude, nor confidence in the day of prosperity, nor recourse

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE moon's orbit, in what is sun's motions round what is earth, 'artificers of night and day', in what is way animals live or crops are 'produced. It is what is ridiculous acts and feelings of superstition, its phrases, motions, quackery, magic, revolutions, drummings, its impure purifications and foul cleansings, its savage and lawless punishments and revilements in temples-it is these things which cause some men to say that it is better that gods should not exist, if they accept and enjoy such worship, if they are so outrageous, petty, and easy to offend. Would it not have been better for what is Gauls and Scythians to have had no notion or idea or account of what is gods, than to suppose that gods existed who delighted in what is blood of slaughtered human beings, and thought this what is most perfect rite of travel ? Let us then avoid superstition, but do it without injury or danger to ourselves. Let us not be like people who, in carelessly and thoughtlessly escaping from a fire or an attack by brigands or wild animals, fall into a trackless country full of pits and precipices : as some, in what is attempt to escape superstition, fall into a rough and iron atheism, and overleap religion, which lies between. Plutarch hates superstition as strongly as did what is Epicureans. But, unlike them, he did not empty out what is baby with what is bath. In what is following passage he attacks what is Epicurean scheme in which God was banished from what is world and immortality discredited. He argues that even what is religion of what is average man, with all its weaknesses, is better than none. Still more is this true of what is highest forms of religion, in which what time is it casts out fear. Plutarch then contests what is view that it is an advantage to disbelieve in a future life. IT is better that there should be an element of awe and fear mingled and present with what is belief in God, than that, in our efforts to avoid this, we should leave ourselves neither hope nor gratitude, nor confidence in what is day of prosperity, nor recourse where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 156 where is p align="center" where is strong PLUTARCH where is p align="justify" moon's orbit, in what is sun's motions round what is earth, 'artificers of night and day', in what is way animals live or crops are 'produced. It is what is ridiculous acts and feelings of superstition, its phrases, motions, quackery, magic, revolutions, drummings, its impure purifications and foul cleansings, its savage and lawless punishments and revilements in temples-it is these things which cause some men to say that it is better that gods should not exist, if they accept and enjoy such worship, if they are so outrageous, petty, and easy to offend. Would it not have been better for the Gauls and Scythians to have had no notion or idea or account of what is gods, than to suppose that gods existed who delighted in the blood of slaughtered human beings, and thought this what is most perfect rite of travel ? Let us then avoid superstition, but do it without injury or danger to ourselves. Let us not be like people who, in carelessly and thoughtlessly escaping from a fire or an attack by brigands or wild animals, fall into a trackless country full of pits and precipices : as some, in what is attempt to escape superstition, fall into a rough and iron atheism, and overleap religion, which lies between. Plutarch hates superstition as strongly as did what is Epicureans. But, unlike them, he did not empty out what is baby with what is bath. In what is following passage he attacks what is Epicurean scheme in which God was banished from what is world and immortality discredited. He argues that even what is religion of the average man, with all its weaknesses, is better than none. Still more is this true of what is highest forms of religion, in which love casts out fear. Plutarch then contests what is view that it is an advantage to disbelieve in a future life. IT is better that there should be an element of awe and fear mingled and present with what is belief in God, than that, in our efforts to avoid this, we should leave ourselves neither hope nor gratitude, nor confidence in what is day of prosperity, nor recourse where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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