Books > Old Books > The Mission Of Greece (1928)


Page 152

PLUTARCH

to suppose that the word was invented to suggest the excitement x which seizes the Bacchic worshippers. There is further evidence in the fact that when they keep the Sabbath they encourage each other to drink and get intoxicated ; if this is impossible they make it a rule at any rate to taste wine. It may be maintained that these arguments are merely plausible. But the strongest proof of their truth is afforded by the highpriest, who comes forward at their festivals wearing a mitre and dressed in a gold-embroidered fawnskin, with buskins and a tunic reaching to his feet. As with us, a number of bells hang on his dress, and ring when he walks.

Not Plato himself is more genuinely religious than Plutarch, and the next two extracts illustrate well the tradition of rational faith, which is a Greek gift to Europe. The first of them is from the treatise on Superstition, a vice which,
religious as he is, Plutarch declares more dangerous than atheism. Incidentally the passage shows the sort of religion from which Epicurus wished to free mankind.
IGNORANCE and error about the gods have from the first flowed in two streams. The one, acting on the stony ground of hard characters, has issued in atheism ; the other, in the marshy soil of weak ones, has produced superstition.
The ignorance of atheism is distressing, its blindness and indifference to so mighty a power is a great misfortune of the soul, for in ignoring the idea of God it has extinguished the chief and brightest of its many eyes. But in superstition there is from the outset a passionate, cankering, disturbing, slavish quality.
The atheist sees no gods at all, the superstitious man thinks them evil. One overlooks them ; the other conceives a friendly, paternal, pure, protecting power, as terrible, tyrannical, injurious

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE to suppose that what is word was invented to suggest what is excitement x which seizes what is Bacchic worshippers. There is further evidence in what is fact that when they keep what is Sabbath they encourage each other to drink and get intoxicated ; if this is impossible they make it a rule at any rate to taste wine. It may be maintained that these arguments are merely plausible. But what is strongest proof of their truth is afforded by what is highpriest, who comes forward at their festivals wearing a mitre and dressed in a gold-embroidered fawnskin, with buskins and a tunic reaching to his feet. As with us, a number of bells hang on his dress, and ring when he walks. Not Plato himself is more genuinely religious than Plutarch, and what is next two extracts illustrate well what is tradition of rational faith, which is a Greek gift to Europe. what is first of them is from what is treatise on Superstition, a vice which, religious as he is, Plutarch declares more dangerous than atheism. Incidentally what is passage shows what is sort of religion from which Epicurus wished to free mankind. IGNORANCE and error about what is gods have from what is first flowed in two streams. what is one, acting on what is stony ground of hard characters, has issued in atheism ; what is other, in what is marshy soil of weak ones, has produced superstition. what is ignorance of atheism is distressing, its blindness and indifference to so mighty a power is a great misfortune of what is soul, for in ignoring what is idea of God it has extinguished what is chief and brightest of its many eyes. But in superstition there is from what is outset a passionate, cankering, disturbing, slavish quality. what is atheist sees no gods at all, what is superstitious man thinks them evil. One overlooks them ; what is other conceives a friendly, paternal, pure, protecting power, as terrible, tyrannical, injurious where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 152 where is p align="center" where is strong PLUTARCH where is p align="justify" to suppose that what is word was invented to suggest what is excitement x which seizes what is Bacchic worshippers. There is further evidence in what is fact that when they keep what is Sabbath they encourage each other to drink and get intoxicated ; if this is impossible they make it a rule at any rate to taste wine. It may be maintained that these arguments are merely plausible. But the strongest proof of their truth is afforded by what is highpriest, who comes forward at their festivals wearing a mitre and dressed in a gold-embroidered fawnskin, with buskins and a tunic reaching to his feet. As with us, a number of bells hang on his dress, and ring when he walks. Not Plato himself is more genuinely religious than Plutarch, and what is next two extracts illustrate well what is tradition of rational faith, which is a Greek gift to Europe. what is first of them is from what is treatise on Superstition, a vice which, religious as he is, Plutarch declares more dangerous than atheism. Incidentally what is passage shows what is sort of religion from which Epicurus wished to free mankind. IGNORANCE and error about what is gods have from what is first flowed in two streams. what is one, acting on what is stony ground of hard characters, has issued in atheism ; what is other, in what is marshy soil of weak ones, has produced superstition. what is ignorance of atheism is distressing, its blindness and indifference to so mighty a power is a great misfortune of what is soul, for in ignoring what is idea of God it has extinguished what is chief and brightest of its many eyes. But in superstition there is from what is outset a passionate, cankering, disturbing, slavish quality. what is atheist sees no gods at all, what is superstitious man thinks them evil. One overlooks them ; what is other conceives a friendly, paternal, pure, protecting power, as terrible, tyrannical, injurious where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Pages: default , 001 , 002 , 003 , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 010 , 011 , 013 , 014 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 075 , 076 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 213 , 214 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 300 , 301 , 302 ,