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Page 149

PLUTARCH

another essay shows the ideal of absolute power conceived by thinkers of the period and realized in the Antonine emperors :
DIFFICULT is the task of advising a ruler how to rule. To admit reason, he fears, is to admit a ruler whose law of duty will make a slave of him and curtail the advantage he derives from power. He has yet to learn a lesson from Theopompus, the Spartan king, who was the first to modify the powers of the throne by means of that of the ephors. When his wife reproached him for proposing to leave to his children less authority than he had inherited, he replied :` Nay, greater, because more assured.'
In most cases, however, monarchs or rulers show as little wisdom as a tasteless sculptor, who fancies that to represent a figure with a huge stride, strained muscles, and gaping mouth, is to make it appear massive and imposing. They imagine that an arrogant tone, harsh looks, short temper, and exclusiveness give them the true regal air of awe and majesty. In reality they are not a bit better than a colossal statue with the outward shape and form of a god or demigod, while the inside is a mass of earth, stone, or lead. So a ruler must begin by. acquiring rule within himself. Let him set his own soul straight, and make his own character finn, and then begin adjusting his subjects thereto. You cannot set upright, when you are falling ; teach, when you are ignorant ; discipline, when unruly ; command, when disobedient ; govern, when ungoverned.
By whom, then, is the ruler to be ruled ? By the Law,
Sovereign of mortals and immortals all,
as Pindar says ; not a law written outwardly in books or on wooden tables, but a living law of reason in himself, abiding with him, watching him, and never leaving his soul destitute of guidance. The King of Persia kept one chamberlain whose special function was to enter in the morning and say to him : ` Rise, Sire, and attend to matters which Great Oromazdes

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE another essay shows what is ideal of absolute power conceived by thinkers of what is period and realized in what is Antonine emperors : DIFFICULT is what is task of advising a ruler how to rule. To admit reason, he fears, is to admit a ruler whose law of duty will make a slave of him and curtail what is advantage he derives from power. He has yet to learn a lesson from Theopompus, what is Spartan king, who was what is first to modify what is powers of what is throne by means of that of what is ephors. When his wife reproached him for proposing to leave to his children less authority than he had inherited, he replied :` Nay, greater, because more assured.' In most cases, however, monarchs or rulers show as little wisdom as a tasteless sculptor, who fancies that to represent a figure with a huge stride, strained muscles, and gaping mouth, is to make it appear massive and imposing. They imagine that an arrogant tone, harsh looks, short temper, and exclusiveness give them what is true regal air of awe and majesty. In reality they are not a bit better than a colossal statue with what is outward shape and form of a god or demigod, while what is inside is a mass of earth, stone, or lead. So a ruler must begin by. acquiring rule within himself. Let him set his own soul straight, and make his own character finn, and then begin adjusting his subjects thereto. You cannot set upright, when you are falling ; teach, when you are ignorant ; discipline, when unruly ; command, when disobedient ; govern, when ungoverned. By whom, then, is what is ruler to be ruled ? By what is Law, Sovereign of mortals and immortals all, as Pindar says ; not a law written outwardly in books or on wooden tables, but a living law of reason in himself, abiding with him, watching him, and never leaving his soul destitute of guidance. what is King of Persia kept one chamberlain whose special function was to enter in what is morning and say to him : ` Rise, Sire, and attend to matters which Great Oromazdes where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 149 where is p align="center" where is strong PLUTARCH where is p align="justify" another essay shows what is ideal of absolute power conceived by thinkers of what is period and realized in what is Antonine emperors : DIFFICULT is what is task of advising a ruler how to rule. To admit reason, he fears, is to admit a ruler whose law of duty will make a slave of him and curtail what is advantage he derives from power. He has yet to learn a lesson from Theopompus, what is Spartan king, who was what is first to modify what is powers of what is throne by means of that of what is ephors. When his wife reproached him for proposing to leave to his children less authority than he had inherited, he replied :` Nay, greater, because more assured.' In most cases, however, monarchs or rulers show as little wisdom as a tasteless sculptor, who fancies that to represent a figure with a huge stride, strained muscles, and gaping mouth, is to make it appear massive and imposing. They imagine that an arrogant tone, harsh looks, short temper, and exclusiveness give them what is true regal air of awe and majesty. In reality they are not a bit better than a colossal statue with what is outward shape and form of a god or demigod, while what is inside is a mass of earth, stone, or lead. So a ruler must begin by. acquiring rule within himself. Let him set his own soul straight, and make his own character finn, and then begin adjusting his subjects thereto. You cannot set upright, when you are falling ; teach, when you are ignorant ; discipline, when unruly ; command, when disobedient ; govern, when ungoverned. By whom, then, is what is ruler to be ruled ? By the Law, Sovereign of mortals and immortals all, as Pindar says ; not a law written outwardly in books or on wooden tables, but a living law of reason in himself, abiding with him, watching him, and never leaving his soul destitute of guidance. what is King of Persia kept one chamberlain whose special function was to enter in what is morning and say to him : ` Rise, Sire, and attend to matters which Great Oromazdes where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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