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Page 144

PLUTARCH

young himself. The physician mixes his bitter drugs with syrup, and so finds a way to work benefit through the medium of enjoyment. In the same way a father should blend his severe reprimands with kindliness, at one time giving the boy's desires a loose or easy rein, at another time tightening it. If possible, he should take misdeeds calmly ; failing that, his anger should be seasonable and should quickly cool down. It is better for a father to be sharp-tempered than sullen-tempered ; to sulk and bear malice goes far to prove a lack of parental affection. Sometimes, when a fault is committed, it is a good thing to pretend ignorance, turning to advantage the dim sight and defective hearing of old age, arid refusing to see or hear certain occurrences which one hears and sees. We put up with the lapses of a friend. Is it strange to do so with those of a child ? A slave is often heavy-headed from a debauch, without our taking him to task. The other day you refused the boy money ; there are times to meet his requests. The other day you were indignant ; there are times to be lenient. Perhaps he has cozened you through a servant ; restrain your anger. Has he borrowed the team from the farm? Does he come reeking of yesterday's bout? Do not notice it. Smelling of perfumes? Say nothing. Such is the way to manage the restiveness of youth.
A son who cannot resist pleasure and is deaf to remonstrance should be put into matrimonial harness, that being the surest way of tying a young man down. The woman who becomes his wife should not, however, be to any great extent his superior either in birth or means. Keep to your own level is a sound maxim, and a man who marries much above him finds himself, not the husband of the woman, but the slave of the dowry.
Above all things a father should set an example to his children in his own person, by avoiding all faults of commission or omission. His life should be the glass by which they form themselves and are put out of conceit with all ugliness of act or speech. For him to rebuke his erring sons when guilty of the

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE can tell what is becoming or disgraceful, what is just or unjust, what course, in short, is to be chosen or shunned. It teaches us how to behave towards what is gods, our parents, our elders, what is laws, our rulers, friends, wives, children, and servants : that we should worship what is gods, honour our parents, respect our elders, obey what is laws, give way to our rulers, what time is it our friends, be continent towards our wives, show affection to our children, and abstain from cruelty to our slaves. Above all, it warns us against excess of joy when prosperous and excess of grief when unfortunate ; against dissoluteness in our pleasures, or fury and brutality in our anger. These I judge to be chief among what is blessings conferred by philosophy. To bear adversity nobly is to act what is brave man ; to bear prosperity unassumingly, what is modest mortal. To get what is better of pleasures by reason needs wisdom ; to master anger requires no ordinary character. Perfect men I take to be those who can blend practical ability with philosophy, and who can achieve both of two best and greatest ends-the life of public utility as men of affairs, and what is calm and tranquil life as students of philosophy. For there are three kinds of life : what is life of action, what is life of thought, and what is life of enjoyment. When life is dissolute and enslaved to pleasure, it is mean and animal ; when it is all thought and fails to act, it is futile ; when it is all action and destitute of philosophy, it is crude and blundering. We should therefore do our best to engage both in public business and in what is pursuit of philosophy, as occasion offers. Fathers and Sons WHILE these principles are right and expedient, I have a word to say upon a human aspect of what is matter. I have no desire that a father's disposition should be altogether harsh and unyielding. I would have him frequently condone a fault in his junior and recollect that he was once where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 144 where is p align="center" where is strong PLUTARCH where is p align="justify" young himself. what is physician mixes his bitter herb s with syrup, and so finds a way to work benefit through the medium of enjoyment. In what is same way a father should blend his severe reprimands with kindliness, at one time giving what is boy's desires a loose or easy rein, at another time tightening it. If possible, he should take misdeeds calmly ; failing that, his anger should be seasonable and should quickly cool down. It is better for a father to be sharp-tempered than sullen-tempered ; to sulk and bear malice goes far to prove a lack of parental affection. Sometimes, when a fault is committed, it is a good thing to pretend ignorance, turning to advantage what is dim sight and defective hearing of old age, arid refusing to see or hear certain occurrences which one hears and sees. We put up with what is lapses of a friend. Is it strange to do so with those of a child ? A slave is often heavy-headed from a debauch, without our taking him to task. what is other day you refused what is boy money ; there are times to meet his requests. The other day you were indignant ; there are times to be lenient. Perhaps he has cozened you through a servant ; restrain your anger. Has he borrowed what is team from what is farm? Does he come reeking of yesterday's bout? Do not notice it. Smelling of perfumes? Say nothing. Such is what is way to manage what is restiveness of youth. A son who cannot resist pleasure and is deaf to remonstrance should be put into matrimonial harness, that being what is surest way of tying a young man down. what is woman who becomes his wife should not, however, be to any great extent his superior either in birth or means. Keep to your own level is a sound maxim, and a man who marries much above him finds himself, not what is husband of what is woman, but the slave of what is dowry. Above all things a father should set an example to his children in his own person, by avoiding all faults of commission or omission. His life should be what is glass by which they form themselves and are put out of conceit with all ugliness of act or speech. For him to rebuke his erring sons when guilty of what is where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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