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Page 140

PLUTARCH

depths of human life. His reflections remind us rather of Addison. Yet we find in this late-born child of Hellas, though not the profundity of the Greek genius, its hungry interest in the world and in man, its fair-mindedness and sanity, its hatred of extremes, its belief that reason should and can rule life. His philosophic creed is characteristic of his mind. He denounces the Stoics for their paradox, the Epicureans for their selfishness and irreligion, and steers a middle, eclectic course, owing more to Plato than to any other thinker.
We may read Plutarch for his sane idealism, his untainted air of genuine goodness, or for his historical interest. His pages are a guide to the life and ideals of the time. We see a Greek youth in 'On Bringing up a Boy' ; 'The Student at Lectures' shows him at the university; ` Advice to Married Couples' reveals him in later life. In 'The Symposiacs ' we hear Greek dinner-table talk, moving lightly over the surface of problems of history, literature, science. In fine the Moyalia show us what an educated Greek in the first century of our era thought about religion and conduct, and how he practised the art of life. The following extracts are chosen with this aim.

The Field of Education
SPEAKING generally, we must say of virtue what it is customary to say of the arts and sciences-that for right action three things must go together, namely, nature, reason, and habit. By reason I mean instruction ; by habit I mean exercise. The first elements come from nature ; progress, from instruction ; the actual use, from practice ; the consummation, from all combined. In so far as any of these is defective, character must necessarily be maimed. Nature without instruction is blind ; instruction without nature is futile ; practice without both is abortive. In farming, the soil must first be good ; next, the farmer must know his business ; third, the seeds must be sound. Similarly with education. Nature is the soil, the teacher is the farmer, the lessons and precepts are the
seed. It may be confidently asserted that all three were harmoniously blended in the souls of those men whose renown is

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE depths of human life. His reflections remind us rather of Addison. Yet we find in this late-born child of Hellas, though not what is profundity of what is Greek genius, its hungry interest in what is world and in man, its fair-mindedness and sanity, its hatred of extremes, its belief that reason should and can rule life. His philosophic creed is characteristic of his mind. He denounces what is Stoics for their paradox, what is Epicureans for their selfishness and irreligion, and steers a middle, eclectic course, owing more to Plato than to any other thinker. We may read Plutarch for his sane idealism, his untainted air of genuine goodness, or for his historical interest. His pages are a guide to what is life and ideals of what is time. We see a Greek youth in 'On Bringing up a Boy' ; 'The Student at Lectures' shows him at what is university; ` Advice to Married Couples' reveals him in later life. In 'The Symposiacs ' we hear Greek dinner-table talk, moving lightly over what is surface of problems of history, literature, science. In fine what is Moyalia show us what an educated Greek in what is first century of our era thought about religion and conduct, and how he practised what is art of life. what is following extracts are chosen with this aim. what is Field of Education SPEAKING generally, we must say of virtue what it is customary to say of what is arts and sciences-that for right action three things must go together, namely, nature, reason, and habit. By reason I mean instruction ; by habit I mean exercise. what is first elements come from nature ; progress, from instruction ; what is actual use, from practice ; what is consummation, from all combined. In so far as any of these is defective, character must necessarily be maimed. Nature without instruction is blind ; instruction without nature is futile ; practice without both is abortive. In farming, what is soil must first be good ; next, what is farmer must know his business ; third, what is seeds must be sound. Similarly with education. Nature is what is soil, what is teacher is what is farmer, what is lessons and precepts are what is seed. It may be confidently asserted that all three were harmoniously blended in what is souls of those men whose renown is where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 140 where is p align="center" where is strong PLUTARCH where is p align="justify" depths of human life. His reflections remind us rather of Addison. Yet we find in this late-born child of Hellas, though not what is profundity of what is Greek genius, its hungry interest in what is world and in man, its fair-mindedness and sanity, its hatred of extremes, its belief that reason should and can rule life. His philosophic creed is characteristic of his mind. He denounces the Stoics for their paradox, what is Epicureans for their selfishness and irreligion, and steers a middle, eclectic course, owing more to Plato than to any other thinker. We may read Plutarch for his sane idealism, his untainted air of genuine goodness, or for his historical interest. His pages are a guide to what is life and ideals of what is time. We see a Greek youth in 'On Bringing up a Boy' ; 'The Student at Lectures' shows him at what is university; ` Advice to Married Couples' reveals him in later life. In 'The Symposiacs ' we hear Greek dinner-table talk, moving lightly over what is surface of problems of history, literature, science. In fine what is Moyalia show us what an educated Greek in what is first century of our era thought about religion and conduct, and how he practised what is art of life. what is following extracts are chosen with this aim. what is Field of Education SPEAKING generally, we must say of virtue what it is customary to say of what is arts and sciences-that for right action three things must go together, namely, nature, reason, and habit. By reason I mean instruction ; by habit I mean exercise. what is first elements come from nature ; progress, from instruction ; what is actual use, from practice ; what is consummation, from all combined. In so far as any of these is defective, character must necessarily be maimed. Nature without instruction is blind ; instruction without nature is futile ; practice without both is abortive. In farming, what is soil must first be good ; next, what is farmer must know his business ; third, the seeds must be sound. Similarly with education. Nature is the soil, what is teacher is what is farmer, what is lessons and precepts are what is seed. It may be confidently asserted that all three were harmoniously blended in what is souls of those men whose renown is where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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