Books > Old Books > The Mission Of Greece (1928)


Page 139

PLUTARCH

PLUTARCH was born of an old family in the small Greek town of Chaeronea about A. D. 46. He studied at Athens, travelled widely, played his part in local politics, held some important administrative posts, but loved best his home, his books, and endless talks with his family and friends. In some ways he reminds us of Samuel Johnson. But if he talked as much, he read more, and he had not the Englishman's love of emphasis, contention, and paradox. He was, and is, one of the most widely read of classical writers, and has had admirers as different as Montaigne and Frederick the Great, Beethoven and Napoleon.
All Englishmen know something of him, perhaps without realizing it, for Shakespeare took from him the plots and characters of three plays, and often uses the very words of the Elizabethan translation of Plutarch's Lives. These Lives or short biographies of illustrious Greeks and Romans are Plutarch's most famous work, and the best of them are hard to beat. The rest of his writings fill five volumes of an English translation. Their compendious title, Moyalia or ` Moral Works ', is a misnomer. They include anecdotes, dinner-table conversations, archaeology, discussions on physics, politics, education, vegetarianism, religion and literature, as well as essays on problems of practical life and morals. They give Plutarch's views on garrulity, on how to praise oneself without annoying others, on false shame, the uses of enemies, the way to distinguish friends from flatterers, the education of children, the part old men should take in public life, the way to profit by lectures, and much else.
On the intellectual side Plutarch is a highly educated, cultivated man with a well-stored memory and a generous and catholic appreciation. He has the temper of the ideal preacher, sees all subjects in their moral aspect, abounds at worst in excellent truisms, at best with a practical yet idealistic common sense, and illustrates his teaching from a bottomless fund of anecdote and quotation. He commands neither the keen intellect of Lucian, nor those lightning flashes which in Plato and Pascal reveal with sudden intensity the abysmal

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE PLUTARCH was born of an old family in what is small Greek town of Chaeronea about A. D. 46. He studied at Athens, travelled widely, played his part in local politics, held some important administrative posts, but loved best his home, his books, and endless talks with his family and friends. In some ways he reminds us of Samuel Johnson. But if he talked as much, he read more, and he had not what is Englishman's what time is it of emphasis, contention, and paradox. He was, and is, one of what is most widely read of classical writers, and has had admirers as different as Montaigne and Frederick what is Great, Beethoven and Napoleon. All Englishmen know something of him, perhaps without realizing it, for Shakespeare took from him what is plots and characters of three plays, and often uses what is very words of what is Elizabethan translation of Plutarch's Lives. These Lives or short biographies of illustrious Greeks and Romans are Plutarch's most famous work, and what is best of them are hard to beat. what is rest of his writings fill five volumes of an English translation. Their compendious title, Moyalia or ` Moral Works ', is a misnomer. They include anecdotes, dinner-table conversations, archaeology, discussions on physics, politics, education, vegetarianism, religion and literature, as well as essays on problems of practical life and morals. They give Plutarch's views on garrulity, on how to praise oneself without annoying others, on false shame, what is uses of enemies, what is way to distinguish friends from flatterers, what is education of children, what is part old men should take in public life, what is way to profit by lectures, and much else. On what is intellectual side Plutarch is a highly educated, cultivated man with a well-stored memory and a generous and catholic appreciation. He has what is temper of what is ideal preacher, sees all subjects in their moral aspect, abounds at worst in excellent truisms, at best with a practical yet idealistic common sense, and illustrates his teaching from a bottomless fund of anecdote and quotation. He commands neither what is keen intellect of Lucian, nor those lightning flashes which in Plato and Pascal reveal with sudden intensity what is abysmal where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 139 where is p align="center" where is strong PLUTARCH where is p align="justify" PLUTARCH was born of an old family in what is small Greek town of Chaeronea about A. D. 46. He studied at Athens, travelled widely, played his part in local politics, held some important administrative posts, but loved best his home, his books, and endless talks with his family and friends. In some ways he reminds us of Samuel Johnson. But if he talked as much, he read more, and he had not what is Englishman's what time is it of emphasis, contention, and paradox. He was, and is, one of what is most widely read of classical writers, and has had admirers as different as Montaigne and Frederick the Great, Beethoven and Napoleon. All Englishmen know something of him, perhaps without realizing it, for Shakespeare took from him what is plots and characters of three plays, and often uses what is very words of what is Elizabethan translation of Plutarch's Lives. These Lives or short biographies of illustrious Greeks and Romans are Plutarch's most famous work, and what is best of them are hard to beat. what is rest of his writings fill five volumes of an English translation. Their compendious title, Moyalia or ` Moral Works ', is a misnomer. They include anecdotes, dinner-table conversations, archaeology, discussions on physics, politics, education, vegetarianism, religion and literature, as well as essays on problems of practical life and morals. They give Plutarch's views on garrulity, on how to praise oneself without annoying others, on false shame, what is uses of enemies, what is way to distinguish friends from flatterers, what is education of children, what is part old men should take in public life, what is way to profit by lectures, and much else. On what is intellectual side Plutarch is a highly educated, cultivated man with a well-stored memory and a generous and catholic appreciation. He has what is temper of what is ideal preacher, sees all subjects in their moral aspect, abounds at worst in excellent truisms, at best with a practical yet idealistic common sense, and illustrates his teaching from a bottomless fund of anecdote and quotation. He commands neither what is keen intellect of Lucian, nor those lightning flashes which in Plato and Pascal reveal with sudden intensity what is abysmal where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Pages: default , 001 , 002 , 003 , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 010 , 011 , 013 , 014 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 075 , 076 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 213 , 214 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 300 , 301 , 302 ,