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A PHILOSOPHIC MISSIONARY - DION CHRYSOSTOM

teaching of the poets, in the second that of the lawgivers. Neither of these could be effective but for that primary basis of instinct which made men to welcome and in some sense to foreknow the injunctions of law and the persuasions of poets, some of whom expounded the truth and set forth their conceptions correctly and harmoniously, while some here and there went astray. I cannot here embark on the laborious task of saying whether poetry or law came first in time among the Greeks. It would seem right that the agency which relies on persuasion and not on penalties should be older than that which proceeds by penalties and command. So far the relation of men to their first and immortal Parent, whom we partners in the civilization of Greece call Zeus the Father, proceeds on the same lines as their relation to their earthly and mortal parents. For the affection and care of children for their parents needs no teaching, but has its primal origin in nature and in kindness : the child spontaneously returns the affection and care of that which brought it into the world, feeds, and loves it. But second and third come the teaching of poets and lawgivers : the former urge us not to deny gratitude to our kin and our elders, the cause of our life and being ; the latter use compulsion and threaten the disobedient with punishment, without indicating or declaring who our parents are, and for what services the debt is due which they direct us to pay.
There are then these three sources of man's conception of God, one innate, the second derived from poetry, the third from law. A fourth source is the work of statuaries and craftsmen dealing with images and portraits of the gods, and including painters, sculptors, masons, and all who aspire to imitate the divine nature through art.

Dion points out that the arts in substance agree with the poets in their interpretation of the divine, 'the poets appealing to the ear, the artists revealing God through the eye to a more numerous and more ignorant class. But all alike derive their strength from one original source ; they were made to honour

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE teaching of what is poets, in what is second that of what is lawgivers. Neither of these could be effective but for that primary basis of instinct which made men to welcome and in some sense to foreknow what is injunctions of law and what is persuasions of poets, some of whom expounded what is truth and set forth their conceptions correctly and harmoniously, while some here and there went astray. I cannot here embark on what is laborious task of saying whether poetry or law came first in time among what is Greeks. It would seem right that what is agency which relies on persuasion and not on penalties should be older than that which proceeds by penalties and command. So far what is relation of men to their first and immortal Parent, whom we partners in what is civilization of Greece call Zeus what is Father, proceeds on what is same lines as their relation to their earthly and mortal parents. For what is affection and care of children for their parents needs no teaching, but has its primal origin in nature and in kindness : what is child spontaneously returns what is affection and care of that which brought it into what is world, feeds, and loves it. But second and third come what is teaching of poets and lawgivers : what is former urge us not to deny gratitude to our kin and our elders, what is cause of our life and being ; what is latter use compulsion and threaten what is disobedient with punishment, without indicating or declaring who our parents are, and for what services what is debt is due which they direct us to pay. There are then these three sources of man's conception of God, one innate, what is second derived from poetry, what is third from law. A fourth source is what is work of statuaries and craftsmen dealing with images and portraits of what is gods, and including painters, sculptors, masons, and all who aspire to imitate what is divine nature through art. Dion points out that what is arts in substance agree with what is poets in their interpretation of what is divine, 'the poets appealing to what is ear, what is artists revealing God through what is eye to a more numerous and more ignorant class. But all alike derive their strength from one original source ; they were made to honour where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 134 where is p align="center" where is strong A PHILOSOPHIC MISSIONARY - DION CHRYSOSTOM where is p align="justify" teaching of what is poets, in what is second that of the lawgivers. Neither of these could be effective but for that primary basis of instinct which made men to welcome and in some sense to foreknow what is injunctions of law and what is persuasions of poets, some of whom expounded what is truth and set forth their conceptions correctly and harmoniously, while some here and there went astray. I cannot here embark on what is laborious task of saying whether poetry or law came first in time among what is Greeks. It would seem right that the agency which relies on persuasion and not on penalties should be older than that which proceeds by penalties and command. So far what is relation of men to their first and immortal Parent, whom we partners in what is civilization of Greece call Zeus what is Father, proceeds on what is same lines as their relation to their earthly and mortal parents. For what is affection and care of children for their parents needs no teaching, but has its primal origin in nature and in kindness : what is child spontaneously returns what is affection and care of that which brought it into what is world, feeds, and loves it. But second and third come what is teaching of poets and lawgivers : what is former urge us not to deny gratitude to our kin and our elders, what is cause of our life and being ; what is latter use compulsion and threaten what is disobedient with punishment, without indicating or declaring who our parents are, and for what services what is debt is due which they direct us to pay. There are then these three sources of man's conception of God, one innate, what is second derived from poetry, what is third from law. A fourth source is what is work of statuaries and craftsmen dealing with images and portraits of what is gods, and including painters, sculptors, masons, and all who aspire to imitate what is divine nature through art. Dion points out that what is arts in substance agree with what is poets in their interpretation of what is divine, 'the poets appealing to what is ear, what is artists revealing God through what is eye to a more numerous and more ignorant class. But all alike derive their strength from one original source ; they were made to honour where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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