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A PHILOSOPHIC MISSIONARY - DION CHRYSOSTOM

more law-abiding than the regular juror, a prince more equitable than the officials of the civil service, a general more just than the soldiers in his army ; when he is more laborious in all his work than those who are compelled to labour, less anxious for luxury than those who can never enjoy it, more benevolent to his subjects than a loving father, more terrible to his enemies than an unconquered and invincible god ; would you not call his genius a blessing not merely to himself but to the world ? When multitudes of cities obey a man, when thousands of peoples are guided by his judgement, when countless tribes who live in isolation from each other look to his wisdom alone, he is the saviour and guardian of mankind if his character is as I have described it.
Such a prince regards goodness as a noble possession for others, but as indispensable for himself. For who needs more wisdom than he who must deliberate on the greatest issues ? Who needs more unerring justice than one who stands above the laws, or stricter self-control than one to whom everything is allowed, or stouter courage than the preserver of the world ? Who delights more in the works of virtue than one who has mankind as spectators and witnesses of his soul ? None of his actions can be hidden any more than the sun can walk in darkness ; for in bringing all else to light he reveals himself first of all.

Dion then points out that mere power is not greatness.
IF a ruler watches in a judicious, benevolent, and law-abiding spirit over the security and the well-being of his subjects, happy himself and sharing his happiness with them, not divorcing his interests from those of his people, but most pleased and most persuaded of his own prosperity when he sees his subjects prosperous, then he is supreme in power and a real monarch. But if he is a lover of pleasure and wealth, tyrannical and lawless, living an idle and indolent life, regarding his subjects as slaves and ministers to his luxury, devoid

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE more law-abiding than what is regular juror, a prince more equitable than what is officials of what is civil service, a general more just than what is soldiers in his army ; when he is more laborious in all his work than those who are compelled to labour, less anxious for luxury than those who can never enjoy it, more benevolent to his subjects than a loving father, more terrible to his enemies than an unconquered and invincible god ; would you not call his genius a blessing not merely to himself but to what is world ? When multitudes of cities obey a man, when thousands of peoples are guided by his judgement, when countless tribes who live in isolation from each other look to his wisdom alone, he is what is saviour and guardian of mankind if his character is as I have described it. Such a prince regards goodness as a noble possession for others, but as indispensable for himself. For who needs more wisdom than he who must deliberate on what is greatest issues ? Who needs more unerring justice than one who stands above what is laws, or stricter self-control than one to whom everything is allowed, or stouter courage than what is preserver of what is world ? Who delights more in what is works of virtue than one who has mankind as spectators and witnesses of his soul ? None of his actions can be hidden any more than what is sun can walk in darkness ; for in bringing all else to light he reveals himself first of all. Dion then points out that mere power is not greatness. IF a ruler watches in a judicious, benevolent, and law-abiding spirit over what is security and what is well-being of his subjects, happy himself and sharing his happiness with them, not divorcing his interests from those of his people, but most pleased and most persuaded of his own prosperity when he sees his subjects prosperous, then he is supreme in power and a real monarch. But if he is a lover of pleasure and wealth, tyrannical and lawless, living an idle and indolent life, regarding his subjects as slaves and ministers to his luxury, devoid where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 128 where is p align="center" where is strong A PHILOSOPHIC MISSIONARY - DION CHRYSOSTOM where is p align="justify" more law-abiding than what is regular juror, a prince more equitable than what is officials of what is civil service, a general more just than what is soldiers in his army ; when he is more laborious in all his work than those who are compelled to labour, less anxious for luxury than those who can never enjoy it, more benevolent to his subjects than a loving father, more terrible to his enemies than an unconquered and invincible god ; would you not call his genius a blessing not merely to himself but to what is world ? When multitudes of cities obey a man, when thousands of peoples are guided by his judgement, when countless tribes who live in isolation from each other look to his wisdom alone, he is what is saviour and guardian of mankind if his character is as I have described it. Such a prince regards goodness as a noble possession for others, but as indispensable for himself. For who needs more wisdom than he who must deliberate on what is greatest issues ? Who needs more unerring justice than one who stands above what is laws, or stricter self-control than one to whom everything is allowed, or stouter courage than what is preserver of what is world ? Who delights more in what is works of virtue than one who has mankind as spectators and witnesses of his soul ? None of his actions can be hidden any more than what is sun can walk in darkness ; for in bringing all else to light he reveals himself first of all. Dion then points out that mere power is not greatness. IF a ruler watches in a judicious, benevolent, and law-abiding spirit over what is security and what is well-being of his subjects, happy himself and sharing his happiness with them, not divorcing his interests from those of his people, but most pleased and most persuaded of his own prosperity when he sees his subjects prosperous, then he is supreme in power and a real monarch. But if he is a lover of pleasure and wealth, tyrannical and lawless, living an idle and indolent life, regarding his subjects as slaves and ministers to his luxury, devoid where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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