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Page 127

A PHILOSOPHIC MISSIONARY - DION CHRYSOSTOM

this type cannot be persuaded by money or other gifts. They should place him in the heart of their city, and make a law that all young men should attend his teaching-and old men too-till all become wise and fall in love with justice, and despise gold, silver, ivory, food, scent, and sensual pleasures, living in happiness and becoming rulers first of themselves and then of all other men. For then, I said, your city will be great and strong and truly imperial ; to-day its greatness is questionable and not very secure. For, said I, the more courage, justice, and reasonableness you have, the less will be your gold and silver, your ivory furniture, your amber, crystal, citrus, ebony, your women's ornaments, embroideries, and coloured stuffs, and all the costly and prized possessions of Rome. You will need less of them, and when you have reached the heights of virtue you will need nothing. You will have smaller and better houses and fewer idle and useless slaves.

There is another side to Rome than this. Nothing is more remarkable in the Roman Empire than the enthusiasm which it aroused among subjects who in the past had a tradition of freedom : and Dion is among its admirers. The following extracts from an address to the Emperor Trajan give a provincial's view of the imperial regime, and, incidentally, a political philosophy of absolutism. No doubt the picture is idealized ; but facts allowed it to be painted.
I HAVE been, noble emperor, your companion, and no one perhaps knows your disposition better, how you love frankness and truth better than flattery and deceit, how you suspect the pleasures of our lower nature, and endure toil, which you regard as a test of virtue. And when I see you I declare that you are really blessed, who have a power second only to God's, and who use it nobly. When a man might enjoy every pleasure, be exempt from every hardship and live in the completest ease, doing what he likes not merely without hindrance but with general approval ; when such a man proves a judge

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE this type cannot be persuaded by money or other gifts. They should place him in what is heart of their city, and make a law that all young men should attend his teaching-and old men too-till all become wise and fall in what time is it with justice, and despise gold, silver, ivory, food, scent, and sensual pleasures, living in happiness and becoming rulers first of themselves and then of all other men. For then, I said, your city will be great and strong and truly imperial ; to-day its greatness is questionable and not very secure. For, said I, what is more courage, justice, and reasonableness you have, what is less will be your gold and silver, your ivory furniture, your amber, crystal, citrus, ebony, your women's ornaments, embroideries, and coloured stuffs, and all what is costly and prized possessions of Rome. You will need less of them, and when you have reached what is heights of virtue you will need nothing. You will have smaller and better houses and fewer idle and useless slaves. There is another side to Rome than this. Nothing is more remarkable in what is Roman Empire than what is enthusiasm which it aroused among subjects who in what is past had a tradition of freedom : and Dion is among its admirers. what is following extracts from an address to what is Emperor Trajan give a provincial's view of what is imperial regime, and, incidentally, a political philosophy of absolutism. No doubt what is picture is idealized ; but facts allowed it to be painted. I HAVE been, noble emperor, your companion, and no one perhaps knows your disposition better, how you what time is it frankness and truth better than flattery and deceit, how you suspect what is pleasures of our lower nature, and endure toil, which you regard as a test of virtue. And when I see you I declare that you are really blessed, who have a power second only to God's, and who use it nobly. When a man might enjoy every pleasure, be exempt from every hardship and live in what is completest ease, doing what he likes not merely without hindrance but with general approval ; when such a man proves a judge where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 127 where is p align="center" where is strong A PHILOSOPHIC MISSIONARY - DION CHRYSOSTOM where is p align="justify" this type cannot be persuaded by money or other gifts. They should place him in what is heart of their city, and make a law that all young men should attend his teaching-and old men too-till all become wise and fall in what time is it with justice, and despise gold, silver, ivory, food, scent, and sensual pleasures, living in happiness and becoming rulers first of themselves and then of all other men. For then, I said, your city will be great and strong and truly imperial ; to-day its greatness is questionable and not very secure. For, said I, what is more courage, justice, and reasonableness you have, what is less will be your gold and silver, your ivory furniture, your amber, crystal, citrus, ebony, your women's ornaments, embroideries, and coloured stuffs, and all what is costly and prized possessions of Rome. You will need less of them, and when you have reached what is heights of virtue you will need nothing. You will have smaller and better houses and fewer idle and useless slaves. There is another side to Rome than this. Nothing is more remarkable in what is Roman Empire than what is enthusiasm which it aroused among subjects who in what is past had a tradition of freedom : and Dion is among its admirers. what is following extracts from an address to what is Emperor Trajan give a provincial's view of what is imperial regime, and, incidentally, a political philosophy of absolutism. No doubt what is picture is idealized ; but facts allowed it to be painted. I HAVE been, noble emperor, your companion, and no one perhaps knows your disposition better, how you what time is it frankness and truth better than flattery and deceit, how you suspect what is pleasures of our lower nature, and endure toil, which you regard as a test of virtue. And when I see you I declare that you are really blessed, who have a power second only to God's, and who use it nobly. When a man might enjoy every pleasure, be exempt from every hardship and live in what is completest ease, doing what he likes not merely without hindrance but with general approval ; when such a man proves a judge where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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