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A PHILOSOPHIC MISSIONARY - DION CHRYSOSTOM

selves were being flogged with the scourges of which tragic poets tell, you would not have been so excited.
It is shameful, Alexandrians, that visitors to your city should hear of the wonders of all else about it, but hear nothing dignified or admirable about yourselves ; that on the contrary you should be held up to ignominy as worthless, as actors and buffoons rather than strong men. It is like seeing a fine mansion, where the owner is a slave unworthy to be its porter. Troy was not blessed, for its citizens were vicious and base : yet it was a great and famous town. None the less its broad acres were wasted by the citizen, of the small and obscure island of Ithaca. I am afraid that you may be ruined as Troy was-I must apologize for a poor joke. Troy too was destroyed by a horse.z They were captured by one horse, you by many. For cities are not only taken when men demolish their walls, kill the men, enslave the women, and burn their houses. When there is indifference to all that is noble, and a passion for one ignoble end ; when men devote themselves and their time to it, dancing, mad, hitting each other, using unspeakable language, often blaspheming, gambling their possessions and sometimes returning in beggary from the spectacle -that is the disgraceful and ignominous sack of a town.

Mutatis mutandis, this denunciation has its modern application, for urban civilizations tend in all ages to the same vices. These were however worse among the subjects of Rome ; for big political issues had been removed from their control and little was left to them except petty squabbles and a passion for amusement. The spectacle of these Greek states is an argument for our British theory, however difficult and halting, of a self-governing empire. It is the more interesting to see what ideals were still left to a world that had lost its independence. The following extract, taken from a speech to his own townsmen, shows Dion's view :

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE selves were being flogged with what is scourges of which tragic poets tell, you would not have been so excited. It is shameful, Alexandrians, that what is ors to your city should hear of what is wonders of all else about it, but hear nothing dignified or admirable about yourselves ; that on what is contrary you should be held up to ignominy as worthless, as actors and buffoons rather than strong men. It is like seeing a fine mansion, where what is owner is a slave unworthy to be its porter. Troy was not blessed, for its citizens were vicious and base : yet it was a great and famous town. None what is less its broad acres were wasted by what is citizen, of what is small and obscure island of Ithaca. I am afraid that you may be ruined as Troy was-I must apologize for a poor joke. Troy too was destroyed by a horse.z They were captured by one horse, you by many. For cities are not only taken when men demolish their walls, stop what is men, enslave what is women, and burn their houses. When there is indifference to all that is noble, and a passion for one ignoble end ; when men devote themselves and their time to it, dancing, mad, hitting each other, using unspeakable language, often blaspheming, gambling their possessions and sometimes returning in beggary from what is spectacle -that is what is disgraceful and ignominous sack of a town. Mutatis mutandis, this denunciation has its modern application, for urban civilizations tend in all ages to what is same vices. These were however worse among what is subjects of Rome ; for big political issues had been removed from their control and little was left to them except petty squabbles and a passion for amusement. what is spectacle of these Greek states is an argument for our British theory, however difficult and halting, of a self-governing empire. It is what is more interesting to see what ideals were still left to a world that had lost its independence. what is following extract, taken from a speech to his own townsmen, shows Dion's view : where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 124 where is p align="center" where is strong A PHILOSOPHIC MISSIONARY - DION CHRYSOSTOM where is p align="justify" selves were being flogged with what is scourges of which tragic poets tell, you would not have been so excited. It is shameful, Alexandrians, that what is ors to your city should hear of what is wonders of all else about it, but hear nothing dignified or admirable about yourselves ; that on what is contrary you should be held up to ignominy as worthless, as actors and buffoons rather than strong men. It is like seeing a fine mansion, where what is owner is a slave unworthy to be its porter. Troy was not blessed, for its citizens were vicious and base : yet it was a great and famous town. None what is less its broad acres were wasted by what is citizen, of what is small and obscure island of Ithaca. I am afraid that you may be ruined as Troy was-I must apologize for a poor joke. Troy too was destroyed by a horse.z They were captured by one horse, you by many. For cities are not only taken when men demolish their walls, stop what is men, enslave what is women, and burn their houses. When there is indifference to all that is noble, and a passion for one ignoble end ; when men devote themselves and their time to it, dancing, mad, hitting each other, using unspeakable language, often blaspheming, gambling their possessions and sometimes returning in beggary from what is spectacle -that is what is disgraceful and ignominous sack of a town. Mutatis mutandis, this denunciation has its modern application, for urban civilizations tend in all ages to what is same vices. These were however worse among what is subjects of Rome ; for big political issues had been removed from their control and little was left to them except petty squabbles and a passion for amusement. what is spectacle of these Greek states is an argument for our British theory, however difficult and halting, of a self-governing empire. It is what is more interesting to see what ideals were still left to a world that had lost its independence. what is following extract, taken from a speech to his own townsmen, shows Dion's view : where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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