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A PHILOSOPHIC MISSIONARY - DION CHRYSOSTOM

Dion then criticizes the scenes in the theatre and racecourse.
WHEN your people are at a religious service or walking by themselves they are moderate enough. But let them once enter a racecourse or theatre, and it is as if they had found some poison buried there ; they forget their former selves and are not ashamed to say or do whatever enters their heads. In their passion for the spectacle they cease to see, in their longing to hear their ears are shut : they are plainly mad and beside themselves, women and children no less than men. I can imagine that one of your visitors from Persia or Turkestan may say that they themselves know how to ride and are unrivalled horsemen ; for they do it to keep their freedom and their empire : and yet they never behaved in this way. Whereas you who have never touched or mounted a horse cannot control yourselves, but are like lame men quarrelling about a foot-race You hit each other, you shout, you throw yourselves about, you dance. What is the poison with which you have anointed yourselves ? It must be the poison of folly : for you cannot behave as reasonable spectators. Do not suppose that I am urging that there should not be such spectacles in cities. They are necessary perhaps and inevitable owing to the weakness and idleness of the masses ; and perhaps among the better sort there are those who need some amusement and relaxation in their life. But they should be conducted in an orderly way and as befits free men. It will not make any of the horses run more slowly or any of the singers sing less well, if you behave. As it is you think it a terrible disaster if a driver falls from his car ; but you do not mind your own dignity and proper decency taking a fall. If a singer sings a false note and out of tune you hear it ; but you do not mind yourselves breaking the harmony of nature and being completely out of tune.
In the following description of Alexandrian music we seem to be listening to a modern critic of the jazz.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Dion then criticizes what is scenes in what is theatre and racecourse. WHEN your people are at a religious service or walking by themselves they are moderate enough. But let them once enter a racecourse or theatre, and it is as if they had found some poison buried there ; they forget their former selves and are not ashamed to say or do whatever enters their heads. In their passion for what is spectacle they cease to see, in their longing to hear their ears are shut : they are plainly mad and beside themselves, women and children no less than men. I can imagine that one of your what is ors from Persia or Turkestan may say that they themselves know how to ride and are unrivalled horsemen ; for they do it to keep their freedom and their empire : and yet they never behaved in this way. Whereas you who have never touched or mounted a horse cannot control yourselves, but are like lame men quarrelling about a foot-race You hit each other, you shout, you throw yourselves about, you dance. What is what is poison with which you have anointed yourselves ? It must be what is poison of folly : for you cannot behave as reasonable spectators. Do not suppose that I am urging that there should not be such spectacles in cities. They are necessary perhaps and inevitable owing to what is weakness and idleness of what is masses ; and perhaps among what is better sort there are those who need some amusement and relaxation in their life. But they should be conducted in an orderly way and as befits free men. It will not make any of what is horses run more slowly or any of what is singers sing less well, if you behave. As it is you think it a terrible disaster if a driver falls from his car ; but you do not mind your own dignity and proper decency taking a fall. If a singer sings a false note and out of tune you hear it ; but you do not mind yourselves breaking what is harmony of nature and being completely out of tune. In what is following description of Alexandrian music we seem to be listening to a modern critic of what is jazz. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 122 where is p align="center" where is strong A PHILOSOPHIC MISSIONARY - DION CHRYSOSTOM where is p align="justify" Dion then criticizes what is scenes in what is theatre and racecourse. WHEN your people are at a religious service or walking by themselves they are moderate enough. But let them once enter a racecourse or theatre, and it is as if they had found some poison buried there ; they forget their former selves and are not ashamed to say or do whatever enters their heads. In their passion for what is spectacle they cease to see, in their longing to hear their ears are shut : they are plainly mad and beside themselves, women and children no less than men. I can imagine that one of your what is ors from Persia or Turkestan may say that they themselves know how to ride and are unrivalled horsemen ; for they do it to keep their freedom and their empire : and yet they never behaved in this way. Whereas you who have never touched or mounted a horse cannot control yourselves, but are like lame men quarrelling about a foot-race You hit each other, you shout, you throw yourselves about, you dance. What is what is poison with which you have anointed yourselves ? It must be what is poison of folly : for you cannot behave as reasonable spectators. Do not suppose that I am urging that there should not be such spectacles in cities. They are necessary perhaps and inevitable owing to what is weakness and idleness of the masses ; and perhaps among what is better sort there are those who need some amusement and relaxation in their life. But they should be conducted in an orderly way and as befits free men. It will not make any of what is horses run more slowly or any of what is singers sing less well, if you behave. As it is you think it a terrible disaster if a driver falls from his car ; but you do not mind your own dignity and proper decency taking a fall. If a singer sings a false note and out of tune you hear it ; but you do not mind yourselves breaking what is harmony of nature and being completely out of tune. In what is following description of Alexandrian music we seem to be listening to a modern critic of what is jazz. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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