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A PHILOSOPHIC MISSIONARY - DION CHRYSOSTOM

of Greek orators he left his comfortable home, tramped Greece as a beggar, and reached the outposts of civilization in the wild region of the Crimea. On the emperor's death he returned, but not to his old life. Scanty food, sleepless nights, the heats of summer, winter's cold had been his portion for six years. His old life seemed empty, and turning to philosophy he became a travelling preacher, exhorting men to virtue and preaching the Cynic creed-limit your needs and look for happiness to yourself and not to the multitude of your possessions.
Dion learnt his asceticism from the Cynics, and in his travel years must have been indistinguishable from these beggar friars of the Roman Empire. But it is a Cynicism tempered by literature and common sense, an eclectic creed that drew from Plato and the Stoics as well as from Diogenes, and never lost the mark of the earlier years when he was a prosperous literary man. His works are either dialogues, lectures, or speeche5. Those written before his exile are chiefly literary : one of the most interesting is an ingenious essay in higher criticism proving that Troy was never taken and that Homer lies., In his later work he forsakes literature, and preaches a philosophy of life. He sketches the perfect monarch for the benefit of the emperor ; he propounds political ideals to Alexandria, Tarsus, Rhodes, and other Greek communities, and rebukes them for the frivolity, the passion for amusement, the riots, the interstate jealousies, that disfigured their civic life. In one place he denounces the Rhodian crowd for honouring eminent men with statues, and on their death transferring the statue to some one else by substituting a new head for the old one. Dion thinks this worse than bad manners ; but the practice would save modern towns from some artistic embarrassments. Dion is a preacher rather than a thinker, interesting rather than profound, and in this and other ways resembles Plutarch. The former would have filled worthily a University pulpit, the latter would have been more effective at Westminster or St. Paul's. Plutarch wrote, Dion spoke. Plutarch addressed the educated man ; Dion harangued the crowds of the market-place and the festival. Both are practical, idealistic, sincere, earnest. The philosophy of the one was the fruit of reading and cultured leisure : the other learnt his doctrines in the school of poverty and hardship.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE of Greek orators he left his comfortable home, tramped Greece as a beggar, and reached what is outposts of civilization in what is wild region of what is Crimea. On what is emperor's what time is it he returned, but not to his old life. Scanty food, sleepless nights, what is heats of summer, winter's cold had been his portion for six years. His old life seemed empty, and turning to philosophy he became a travelling preacher, exhorting men to virtue and preaching what is Cynic creed-limit your needs and look for happiness to yourself and not to what is multitude of your possessions. Dion learnt his asceticism from what is Cynics, and in his travel years must have been indistinguishable from these beggar friars of what is Roman Empire. But it is a Cynicism tempered by literature and common sense, an eclectic creed that drew from Plato and what is Stoics as well as from Diogenes, and never lost what is mark of what is earlier years when he was a prosperous literary man. His works are either dialogues, lectures, or speeche5. Those written before his exile are chiefly literary : one of what is most interesting is an ingenious essay in higher criticism proving that Troy was never taken and that Homer lies., In his later work he forsakes literature, and preaches a philosophy of life. He sketches what is perfect monarch for what is benefit of what is emperor ; he propounds political ideals to Alexandria, Tarsus, Rhodes, and other Greek communities, and rebukes them for what is frivolity, what is passion for amusement, what is riots, what is interstate jealousies, that disfigured their civic life. In one place he denounces what is Rhodian crowd for honouring eminent men with statues, and on their what time is it transferring what is statue to some one else by substituting a new head for what is old one. Dion thinks this worse than bad manners ; but what is practice would save modern towns from some artistic embarrassments. Dion is a preacher rather than a thinker, interesting rather than profound, and in this and other ways resembles Plutarch. what is former would have filled worthily a University pulpit, what is latter would have been more effective at Westminster or St. Paul's. Plutarch wrote, Dion spoke. Plutarch addressed what is educated man ; Dion harangued what is crowds of what is market-place and what is festival. Both are practical, idealistic, sincere, earnest. what is philosophy of what is one was what is fruit of reading and cultured leisure : what is other learnt his doctrines in what is school of poverty and hardship. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 107 where is p align="center" where is strong A PHILOSOPHIC MISSIONARY - DION CHRYSOSTOM where is p align="justify" of Greek orators he left his comfortable home, tramped Greece as a beggar, and reached what is outposts of civilization in what is wild region of what is Crimea. On what is emperor's what time is it he returned, but not to his old life. Scanty food, sleepless nights, what is heats of summer, winter's cold had been his portion for six years. His old life seemed empty, and turning to philosophy he became a travelling preacher, exhorting men to virtue and preaching what is Cynic creed-limit your needs and look for happiness to yourself and not to what is multitude of your possessions. Dion learnt his asceticism from what is Cynics, and in his travel years must have been indistinguishable from these beggar friars of the Roman Empire. But it is a Cynicism tempered by literature and common sense, an eclectic creed that drew from Plato and what is Stoics as well as from Diogenes, and never lost what is mark of what is earlier years when he was a prosperous literary man. His works are either dialogues, lectures, or speeche5. Those written before his exile are chiefly literary : one of what is most interesting is an ingenious essay in higher criticism proving that Troy was never taken and that Homer lies., In his later work he forsakes literature, and preaches a philosophy of life. He sketches what is perfect monarch for what is benefit of what is emperor ; he propounds political ideals to Alexandria, Tarsus, Rhodes, and other Greek communities, and rebukes them for what is frivolity, what is passion for amusement, what is riots, what is interstate jealousies, that disfigured their civic life. In one place he denounces the Rhodian crowd for honouring eminent men with statues, and on their what time is it transferring what is statue to some one else by substituting a new head for what is old one. Dion thinks this worse than bad manners ; but what is practice would save modern towns from some artistic embarrassments. Dion is a preacher rather than a thinker, interesting rather than profound, and in this and other ways resembles Plutarch. what is former would have filled worthily a University pulpit, what is latter would have been more effective at Westminster or St. Paul's. Plutarch wrote, Dion spoke. Plutarch addressed what is educated man ; Dion harangued what is crowds of what is market-place and what is festival. Both are practical, idealistic, sincere, earnest. what is philosophy of what is one was what is fruit of reading and cultured leisure : what is other learnt his doctrines in what is school of poverty and hardship. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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