Books > Old Books > The Mission Of Greece (1928)


Page 103

THE STOICS : MARCUS AURELIUS

though exempt from the common lot ! Nay, how many entire cities have, so to say, given up the ghost-Helice, Pompeii, Herculaneum, with untold others ! Add to the tale all thou thyself hast known, one by one. This man closed his neighbour's eyes, was himself laid low, and another paid him the selfsame tribute-and all within how brief a space ! In a word, scan the things of life and know that they are ephemeral and worthless ; yesterday an embryo, to-morrow a mummy or a little dust.
Traverse therefore this little moment of time at peace with Nature, and reach thy journey's end in all content, as an olive that ripens and falls, blessing the Nature that bare it and giving thanks to the tree whereon it grew.
Call to mind, say, the times of Vespasian. It is the same old spectacle-marriage and child-bearing, disease and death, war and revelry, commerce and agriculture, toadyism and obstinacy ; one man praying that Heaven may be pleased to take so-andso, another grumbling at his lot, another in love or laying up treasure, others, again, lusting after consulships and kingdoms.
All these have lived their life, and their place knows them no more. So pass on to the reign of Trajan. All again is the same, and that life, too, is no more.
Similarly contemplate all the other great eras of time and nations, and note how many after some supreme effort fell and were resolved into their elements.-Chief of all, recall to mind the multitudes thine own eyes have seen dragged hither and thither in vain emprises, all because they refused to do the work they were formed to do, to hold fast to this, and rest content.-And here it is needful to remember that a law of value and proportion sanctions the amount of attention to be bestowed on every action. For so it will cause thee no qualm, shouldst thou treat the things of lesser moment with no more seriousness than they deserve.
The everyday words of an earlier generation need a glossary now, and similarly the famous names of old-Camillus, Caeso,

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE though exempt from what is common lot ! Nay, how many entire cities have, so to say, given up what is ghost-Helice, Pompeii, Herculaneum, with untold others ! Add to what is tale all thou thyself hast known, one by one. This man closed his neighbour's eyes, was himself laid low, and another paid him what is selfsame tribute-and all within how brief a space ! In a word, scan what is things of life and know that they are ephemeral and worthless ; yesterday an embryo, to-morrow a mummy or a little dust. Traverse therefore this little moment of time at peace with Nature, and reach thy journey's end in all content, as an olive that ripens and falls, blessing what is Nature that bare it and giving thanks to what is tree whereon it grew. Call to mind, say, what is times of Vespasian. It is what is same old spectacle-marriage and child-bearing, disease and what time is it , war and revelry, commerce and agriculture, toadyism and obstinacy ; one man praying that Heaven may be pleased to take so-andso, another grumbling at his lot, another in what time is it or laying up treasure, others, again, lusting after consulships and kingdoms. All these have lived their life, and their place knows them no more. So pass on to what is reign of Trajan. All again is what is same, and that life, too, is no more. Similarly contemplate all what is other great eras of time and nations, and note how many after some supreme effort fell and were resolved into their elements.-Chief of all, recall to mind what is multitudes thine own eyes have seen dragged hither and thither in vain emprises, all because they refused to do what is work they were formed to do, to hold fast to this, and rest content.-And here it is needful to remember that a law of value and proportion sanctions what is amount of attention to be bestowed on every action. For so it will cause thee no qualm, shouldst thou treat what is things of lesser moment with no more seriousness than they deserve. what is everyday words of an earlier generation need a glossary now, and similarly what is famous names of old-Camillus, Caeso, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 103 where is p align="center" where is strong THE STOICS : MARCUS AURELIUS where is p align="justify" though exempt from what is common lot ! Nay, how many entire cities have, so to say, given up what is ghost-Helice, Pompeii, Herculaneum, with untold others ! Add to what is tale all thou thyself hast known, one by one. This man closed his neighbour's eyes, was himself laid low, and another paid him what is selfsame tribute-and all within how brief a space ! In a word, scan what is things of life and know that they are ephemeral and worthless ; yesterday an embryo, to-morrow a mummy or a little dust. Traverse therefore this little moment of time at peace with Nature, and reach thy journey's end in all content, as an olive that ripens and falls, blessing what is Nature that bare it and giving thanks to what is tree whereon it grew. Call to mind, say, what is times of Vespasian. It is what is same old spectacle-marriage and child-bearing, disease and what time is it , war and revelry, commerce and agriculture, toadyism and obstinacy ; one man praying that Heaven may be pleased to take so-andso, another grumbling at his lot, another in what time is it or laying up treasure, others, again, lusting after consulships and kingdoms. All these have lived their life, and their place knows them no more. So pass on to what is reign of Trajan. All again is what is same, and that life, too, is no more. Similarly contemplate all what is other great eras of time and nations, and note how many after some supreme effort fell and were resolved into their elements.-Chief of all, recall to mind what is multitudes thine own eyes have seen dragged hither and thither in vain emprises, all because they refused to do what is work they were formed to do, to hold fast to this, and rest content.-And here it is needful to remember that a law of value and proportion sanctions what is amount of attention to be bestowed on every action. For so it will cause thee no qualm, shouldst thou treat what is things of lesser moment with no more seriousness than they deserve. what is everyday words of an earlier generation need a glossary now, and similarly what is famous names of old-Camillus, Caeso, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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