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Page 102

THE STOICS : MARCUS AURELIUS

obey ! I go from friends, it is true, but without a struggle and without a qualm. For this act also was ordained by Nature.

Much of this is not our idea of Stoicism. Sometimes it recalls Christianity, sometimes Buddhism. These gentle, melancholy tones are very unlike the brusque, bracing, almost brutal phrases of Epictetus. This is partly due to the fact that the Meditations is not a lecture or book on Stoicism. It is a spiritual diary, the musings of a man on the events and trials of every day, jotted down as they came, without an eye to publication and therefore haphazard and disordered. But underneath lie the familiar Stoic principles. Man's duty is to follow Reason. The Universe is the creation of Reason and therefore good. Our task is to accept it, will what it wills, and co-operate with it. Happiness is found by willing the right things. Nothing matters except our will. As long as we remember this, and do not fix our affections on things which we cannot control, we need never know fear or pain or unhappiness. Things are not unpleasant or painful in themselves : they only become unpleasant when we think them so. These are the fundamental doctrines of Stoic morals, and they are the steel framework on which the Meditations are built up.
But there is one note in the book which is not Stoic, but comes from the emperor himself. It sounds repeatedly its melancholy leit-motif in the most eloquent and perhaps the most deeply felt passages of the Meditations. It is the voice of a nature set to do a task not beyond its powers but against its own desires. We hear it in the following passages.
ALL is the same : in experience, familiar ; in time, ephemeral ; in matter, sordid ; and all in our days is as in the days of those we buried.
Bethink thee, time and again, how many leeches that bent their solemn brows on patients innumerable have followed them to death ; how many astrologers that magnanimously foretold the end of others ; how many sages that discussed at portentous length mortality and immortality ; how many captains that slew their thousands ; how many tyrants that breathed terror and insolence and meted out life and death, as

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE obey ! I go from friends, it is true, but without a struggle and without a qualm. For this act also was ordained by Nature. Much of this is not our idea of Stoicism. Sometimes it recalls Christianity, sometimes Buddhism. These gentle, melancholy tones are very unlike what is brusque, bracing, almost brutal phrases of Epictetus. This is partly due to what is fact that what is Meditations is not a lecture or book on Stoicism. It is a spiritual diary, what is musings of a man on what is events and trials of every day, jotted down as they came, without an eye to publication and therefore haphazard and disordered. But underneath lie what is familiar Stoic principles. Man's duty is to follow Reason. what is Universe is what is creation of Reason and therefore good. Our task is to accept it, will what it wills, and co-operate with it. Happiness is found by willing what is right things. Nothing matters except our will. As long as we remember this, and do not fix our affections on things which we cannot control, we need never know fear or pain or unhappiness. Things are not unpleasant or painful in themselves : they only become unpleasant when we think them so. These are what is fundamental doctrines of Stoic morals, and they are what is steel framework on which what is Meditations are built up. But there is one note in what is book which is not Stoic, but comes from what is emperor himself. It sounds repeatedly its melancholy leit-motif in what is most eloquent and perhaps what is most deeply felt passages of what is Meditations. It is what is voice of a nature set to do a task not beyond its powers but against its own desires. We hear it in what is following passages. ALL is what is same : in experience, familiar ; in time, ephemeral ; in matter, sordid ; and all in our days is as in what is days of those we buried. Bethink thee, time and again, how many leeches that bent their solemn brows on patients innumerable have followed them to what time is it ; how many astrologers that magnanimously foretold what is end of others ; how many sages that discussed at portentous length mortality and immortality ; how many captains that slew their thousands ; how many tyrants that breathed terror and insolence and meted out life and what time is it , as where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 102 where is p align="center" where is strong THE STOICS : MARCUS AURELIUS where is p align="justify" obey ! I go from friends, it is true, but without a struggle and without a qualm. For this act also was ordained by Nature. Much of this is not our idea of Stoicism. Sometimes it recalls Christianity, sometimes Buddhism. These gentle, melancholy tones are very unlike what is brusque, bracing, almost brutal phrases of Epictetus. This is partly due to what is fact that what is Meditations is not a lecture or book on Stoicism. It is a spiritual diary, what is musings of a man on what is events and trials of every day, jotted down as they came, without an eye to publication and therefore haphazard and disordered. But underneath lie what is familiar Stoic principles. Man's duty is to follow Reason. what is Universe is the creation of Reason and therefore good. Our task is to accept it, will what it wills, and co-operate with it. Happiness is found by willing what is right things. Nothing matters except our will. As long as we remember this, and do not fix our affections on things which we cannot control, we need never know fear or pain or unhappiness. Things are not unpleasant or painful in themselves : they only become unpleasant when we think them so. These are what is fundamental doctrines of Stoic morals, and they are what is steel framework on which what is Meditations are built up. But there is one note in what is book which is not Stoic, but comes from what is emperor himself. It sounds repeatedly its melancholy leit-motif in what is most eloquent and perhaps what is most deeply felt passages of what is Meditations. It is what is voice of a nature set to do a task not beyond its powers but against its own desires. We hear it in what is following passages. ALL is what is same : in experience, familiar ; in time, ephemeral ; in matter, sordid ; and all in our days is as in the days of those we buried. Bethink thee, time and again, how many leeches that bent their solemn brows on patients innumerable have followed them to what time is it ; how many astrologers that magnanimously foretold what is end of others ; how many sages that discussed at portentous length mortality and immortality ; how many captains that slew their thousands ; how many tyrants that breathed terror and insolence and meted out life and what time is it , as where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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