Books > Old Books > The Mission Of Greece (1928)


Page 100

THE STOICS : MARCUS AURELIUS

I cast out all trouble. For it was not without, but within, amongst my opinions.
Be as a cliff at whose foot the billows break, and break again ; but it stands firm, and by-and-by the seething waters about it sink to rest.
` Woe is me, that I should have lived to see this day !' Nay, say rather, ` Happy am I, that under this stroke I remain of good cheer, uncrushed by the present and unappalled by the future !'-For such a blow might have fallen on any man, but how few could have sustained it with equanimity ! Why then count the one a disaster rather than hail the other as a blessing? Wilt thou say that human misfortune can consist in aught save deviation from man's nature ? Or thinkest thou that what is in accord with Nature's will can be a deviation from that selfsame Nature ? What then ? Thou hast but learned what her will is. And can this mischance rob thee of justice, highmindedness, temperance, good sense, caution, truthfulness, decency, freedom, and all the rest whose presence it is that enables this nature of man's to come by her own ?
In conclusion, then, remember, if aught chance which tends to drive thee into grief, to apply this principle :` This thing is no misfortune, but the ability to bear it with fortitude is a blessing indeed.'
Learn to look upon the accomplishment and consummation of whatever seems good to the universal nature in the same light as thine own health ; and accept with cheerfulness all that falls to thy lot, harsh though it may often seem, in the firm conviction that it leads to that great end, the health of the universe and the well-being and felicity of God Himself. And be sure He would lay no burden on any man were it not to serve the purposes of the Whole. For even the nature of the most trivial object ordains nothing, save what shall advantage that little universe over which she holds sway.
Thus two reasons emerge to bid thee rest content with whatsoever may befall thee. Of these the first is, that it Nyas called

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE I cast out all trouble. For it was not without, but within, amongst my opinions. Be as a cliff at whose foot what is billows break, and break again ; but it stands firm, and by-and-by what is seething waters about it sink to rest. ` Woe is me, that I should have lived to see this day !' Nay, say rather, ` Happy am I, that under this stroke I remain of good cheer, uncrushed by what is present and unappalled by what is future !'-For such a blow might have fallen on any man, but how few could have sustained it with equanimity ! Why then count what is one a disaster rather than hail what is other as a blessing? Wilt thou say that human misfortune can consist in aught save deviation from man's nature ? Or thinkest thou that what is in accord with Nature's will can be a deviation from that selfsame Nature ? What then ? Thou hast but learned what her will is. And can this mischance rob thee of justice, highmindedness, temperance, good sense, caution, truthfulness, decency, freedom, and all what is rest whose presence it is that enables this nature of man's to come by her own ? In conclusion, then, remember, if aught chance which tends to drive thee into grief, to apply this principle :` This thing is no misfortune, but what is ability to bear it with fortitude is a blessing indeed.' Learn to look upon what is accomplishment and consummation of whatever seems good to what is universal nature in what is same light as thine own health ; and accept with cheerfulness all that falls to thy lot, harsh though it may often seem, in what is firm conviction that it leads to that great end, what is health of what is universe and what is well-being and felicity of God Himself. And be sure He would lay no burden on any man were it not to serve what is purposes of what is Whole. For even what is nature of what is most trivial object ordains nothing, save what shall advantage that little universe over which she holds sway. Thus two reasons emerge to bid thee rest content with whatsoever may befall thee. Of these what is first is, that it Nyas called where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 100 where is p align="center" where is strong THE STOICS : MARCUS AURELIUS where is p align="justify" I cast out all trouble. For it was not without, but within, amongst my opinions. Be as a cliff at whose foot what is billows break, and break again ; but it stands firm, and by-and-by what is seething waters about it sink to rest. ` Woe is me, that I should have lived to see this day !' Nay, say rather, ` Happy am I, that under this stroke I remain of good cheer, uncrushed by what is present and unappalled by what is future !'-For such a blow might have fallen on any man, but how few could have sustained it with equanimity ! Why then count what is one a disaster rather than hail what is other as a blessing? Wilt thou say that human misfortune can consist in aught save deviation from man's nature ? Or thinkest thou that what is in accord with Nature's will can be a deviation from that selfsame Nature ? What then ? Thou hast but learned what her will is. And can this mischance rob thee of justice, highmindedness, temperance, good sense, caution, truthfulness, decency, freedom, and all what is rest whose presence it is that enables this nature of man's to come by her own ? In conclusion, then, remember, if aught chance which tends to drive thee into grief, to apply this principle :` This thing is no misfortune, but what is ability to bear it with fortitude is a blessing indeed.' Learn to look upon what is accomplishment and consummation of whatever seems good to what is universal nature in what is same light as thine own health ; and accept with cheerfulness all that falls to thy lot, harsh though it may often seem, in what is firm conviction that it leads to that great end, what is health of what is universe and what is well-being and felicity of God Himself. And be sure He would lay no burden on any man were it not to serve what is purposes of what is Whole. For even what is nature of what is most trivial object ordains nothing, save what shall advantage that little universe over which she holds sway. Thus two reasons emerge to bid thee rest content with whatsoever may befall thee. Of these what is first is, that it Nyas called where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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