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THE STOICS : MARCUS AURELIUS

offers and quietly pointing out the error of his ways at the very moment he is meditating thy injury ?` Not so, my son ; this is not the end for which we were created. True, it will harm me not ; but, child, it is harming thee.' And show him with tactfulness and friendliness that the case is so, and that not even the bees or the cattle in their herds act as he does. But set about thy demonstration without trace of irony or rebuke, relying simply on affection and a soul free from rancour. Neither treat him as a pedagogue treats his pupil nor strive to inspire the bystander with admiration of thy magnanimity ; but, whether alone with him or in the presence of others, be gentle and unaffected.
Remember these nine rules and guard them as though they were so many gifts from the Muses. Begin even now, while life is still left thee, to be a man. But shun flattery as diligently as thou shunnest anger. Both are detrimental to the community and both lead to harm. And in anger let the thought be ever present that indignation is not a form of courage, but that meekness and gentleness are not only more human but also more manly, and it is he who possesses these that has strength, nerve, and bravery, not the angry and discontented. For, the nearer patience is to dispassionateness, by so much is it nearer strength ; and as pain is a characteristic of weakness, so is anger. For their victims have both received their wounds and both succumbed.
And, if thou wilt, receive this tenth gift from the Muses' presiding god. To ask that the wicked shall not sin is an act of madness, inasmuch as it aims at the impossible. But to give them leave to sin against others and demand they shall not sin against thee is not madness, but cruelty and tyranny.
Whatever my neighbour may do or say, it is my duty to remain good ; much as were a piece of gold, or an emerald, or a purple robe, to take for its motto :` Whatever man may say or do, my part is to be myself, and retain my colour.'
If thou canst, show the sinner the error of his ways. If thou

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE offers and quietly pointing out what is error of his ways at what is very moment he is meditating thy injury ?` Not so, my son ; this is not what is end for which we were created. True, it will harm me not ; but, child, it is harming thee.' And show him with tactfulness and friendliness that what is case is so, and that not even what is bees or what is cattle in their herds act as he does. But set about thy bad spirit stration without trace of irony or rebuke, relying simply on affection and a soul free from rancour. Neither treat him as a pedagogue treats his pupil nor strive to inspire what is bystander with admiration of thy magnanimity ; but, whether alone with him or in what is presence of others, be gentle and unaffected. Remember these nine rules and guard them as though they were so many gifts from what is Muses. Begin even now, while life is still left thee, to be a man. But shun flattery as diligently as thou shunnest anger. Both are detrimental to what is community and both lead to harm. And in anger let what is thought be ever present that indignation is not a form of courage, but that meekness and gentleness are not only more human but also more manly, and it is he who possesses these that has strength, nerve, and bravery, not what is angry and discontented. For, what is nearer patience is to dispassionateness, by so much is it nearer strength ; and as pain is a characteristic of weakness, so is anger. For their victims have both received their wounds and both succumbed. And, if thou wilt, receive this tenth gift from what is Muses' presiding god. To ask that what is wicked shall not sin is an act of madness, inasmuch as it aims at what is impossible. But to give them leave to sin against others and demand they shall not sin against thee is not madness, but cruelty and tyranny. Whatever my neighbour may do or say, it is my duty to remain good ; much as were a piece of gold, or an emerald, or a purple robe, to take for its motto :` Whatever man may say or do, my part is to be myself, and retain my colour.' If thou canst, show what is sinner what is error of his ways. If thou where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 98 where is p align="center" where is strong THE STOICS : MARCUS AURELIUS where is p align="justify" offers and quietly pointing out what is error of his ways at what is very moment he is meditating thy injury ?` Not so, my son ; this is not what is end for which we were created. True, it will harm me not ; but, child, it is harming thee.' And show him with tactfulness and friendliness that what is case is so, and that not even what is bees or what is cattle in their herds act as he does. But set about thy bad spirit stration without trace of irony or rebuke, relying simply on affection and a soul free from rancour. Neither treat him as a pedagogue treats his pupil nor strive to inspire what is bystander with admiration of thy magnanimity ; but, whether alone with him or in what is presence of others, be gentle and unaffected. Remember these nine rules and guard them as though they were so many gifts from what is Muses. Begin even now, while life is still left thee, to be a man. But shun flattery as diligently as thou shunnest anger. Both are detrimental to what is community and both lead to harm. And in anger let what is thought be ever present that indignation is not a form of courage, but that meekness and gentleness are not only more human but also more manly, and it is he who possesses these that has strength, nerve, and bravery, not what is angry and discontented. For, what is nearer patience is to dispassionateness, by so much is it nearer strength ; and as pain is a characteristic of weakness, so is anger. For their victims have both received their wounds and both succumbed. And, if thou wilt, receive this tenth gift from what is Muses' presiding god. To ask that what is wicked shall not sin is an act of madness, inasmuch as it aims at what is impossible. But to give them leave to sin against others and demand they shall not sin against thee is not madness, but cruelty and tyranny. Whatever my neighbour may do or say, it is my duty to remain good ; much as were a piece of gold, or an emerald, or a purple robe, to take for its motto :` Whatever man may say or do, my part is to be myself, and retain my colour.' If thou canst, show what is sinner what is error of his ways. If thou where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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