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Page 97

THE STOICS : MARCUS AURELIUS

no duty of thine to take them amiss ; while if they are wrong it is clear they err through ignorance, not of free will. For as no soul is willingly deprived of truth, so neither is it willingly deprived of the power of treating every one according to his merits. Whence it comes that nothing pricks a man more than to be spoken of as unjust, cruel, avaricious, or, in a word, as a bad neighbour.
Fourthly, bethink thee thou hast vices enough of thine own, and art a sinner with the rest. True, thou holdest aloof from certain errors, yet thy character is prone to fall into them, though cowardice, love of reputation, or some equally despicable motive may save thee from such overt commission.
Fifthly, remember thou hast no sure knowledge that they sin at all. For many acts are merely means to some hidden end, and, in general, much is to learn before one man can pronounce with certainty on the action of another.
Sixthly, when utter vexation and impatience overpower thee, take refuge in the thought that man's life is but for a moment, and anon we shall all be under the sod.
Seventhly, consider that it is not men's actions that trouble us,-for they are situate in the agent's ruling faculty, but purely our own opinions on them. Then take this judgement of thine that pronounces this or that an object of terror, dare to cast it out, and anger vanishes with it.-` How is this to be done ?' you ask.-By reflecting that another's sin is not thy dishonour. For, unless dishonour be the sole evil, it is inevitable that thou must commit untold sins and turn robber, or what not, at the same time as thy neighbour.
Eighthly, bear in mind how much harder to endure are the consequences of the anger and grief that ensue on an act than is the act itself which evoked these feelings.
Ninthly, reflect that kindliness is invincible, provided only it be genuine and not the specious grin of hypocrisy. For how can the extremity of insolence touch thee if thou preserve thy goodwill to the sinner, meekly admonishing him as opportunity

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE no duty of thine to take them amiss ; while if they are wrong it is clear they err through ignorance, not of free will. For as no soul is willingly deprived of truth, so neither is it willingly deprived of what is power of treating every one according to his merits. Whence it comes that nothing pricks a man more than to be spoken of as unjust, cruel, avaricious, or, in a word, as a bad neighbour. Fourthly, bethink thee thou hast vices enough of thine own, and art a sinner with what is rest. True, thou holdest aloof from certain errors, yet thy character is prone to fall into them, though cowardice, what time is it of reputation, or some equally despicable motive may save thee from such overt commission. Fifthly, remember thou hast no sure knowledge that they sin at all. For many acts are merely means to some hidden end, and, in general, much is to learn before one man can pronounce with certainty on what is action of another. Sixthly, when utter vexation and impatience overpower thee, take refuge in what is thought that man's life is but for a moment, and anon we shall all be under what is sod. Seventhly, consider that it is not men's actions that trouble us,-for they are situate in what is agent's ruling faculty, but purely our own opinions on them. Then take this judgement of thine that pronounces this or that an object of terror, dare to cast it out, and anger vanishes with it.-` How is this to be done ?' you ask.-By reflecting that another's sin is not thy dishonour. For, unless dishonour be what is sole evil, it is inevitable that thou must commit untold sins and turn robber, or what not, at what is same time as thy neighbour. Eighthly, bear in mind how much harder to endure are what is consequences of what is anger and grief that ensue on an act than is what is act itself which evoked these feelings. Ninthly, reflect that kindliness is invincible, provided only it be genuine and not what is specious grin of hypocrisy. For how can what is extremity of insolence touch thee if thou preserve thy goodwill to what is sinner, meekly admonishing him as opportunity where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 97 where is p align="center" where is strong THE STOICS : MARCUS AURELIUS where is p align="justify" no duty of thine to take them amiss ; while if they are wrong it is clear they err through ignorance, not of free will. For as no soul is willingly deprived of truth, so neither is it willingly deprived of what is power of treating every one according to his merits. Whence it comes that nothing pricks a man more than to be spoken of as unjust, cruel, avaricious, or, in a word, as a bad neighbour. Fourthly, bethink thee thou hast vices enough of thine own, and art a sinner with what is rest. True, thou holdest aloof from certain errors, yet thy character is prone to fall into them, though cowardice, what time is it of reputation, or some equally despicable motive may save thee from such overt commission. Fifthly, remember thou hast no sure knowledge that they sin at all. For many acts are merely means to some hidden end, and, in general, much is to learn before one man can pronounce with certainty on what is action of another. Sixthly, when utter vexation and impatience overpower thee, take refuge in what is thought that man's life is but for a moment, and anon we shall all be under what is sod. Seventhly, consider that it is not men's actions that trouble us,-for they are situate in what is agent's ruling faculty, but purely our own opinions on them. Then take this judgement of thine that pronounces this or that an object of terror, dare to cast it out, and anger vanishes with it.-` How is this to be done ?' you ask.-By reflecting that another's sin is not thy dishonour. For, unless dishonour be what is sole evil, it is inevitable that thou must commit untold sins and turn robber, or what not, at what is same time as thy neighbour. Eighthly, bear in mind how much harder to endure are what is consequences of what is anger and grief that ensue on an act than is what is act itself which evoked these feelings. Ninthly, reflect that kindliness is invincible, provided only it be genuine and not what is specious grin of hypocrisy. For how can what is extremity of insolence touch thee if thou preserve thy goodwill to what is sinner, meekly admonishing him as opportunity where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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