Books > Old Books > The Mission Of Greece (1928)


Page 88

THE STOICS : MARCUS AURELIUS

chatter, and an unassuming bearing. See how many gifts are within thy reach at any and every moment ! In none of these does the excuse of natural incapacity avail ; yet thou still fearest to rise ! Can natural incapacity compel thee to a grumbling, miserly life of toadyism, to abuse of thy poor body, flattery, ostentation, and perpetual restlessness of soul ? Heaven forfend ! Say, rather, all this might have been banished long ago. The utmost that 'natural incapacity' can do-if even so much as this-is to earn thee a measure of contempt for slowness of comprehension and a certain hebetude of intellect. And it is thy part to minimize even this by careful training, not to look on dullness either as a thing unworthy serious thought or as a fit object for complacent pride.
It is the nature of some men, when they have behaved especially well to a fellow creature, to sit down and cast up on the spot the debt of gratitude due to them. Others are not quite so premature, yet, in their hearts, look on the beneficiaire as in some sort their debtor, and are perfectly conscious of what they have done. Then comes the man who, so to say, has no conception that he has done anything whatever, but may be compared to the vine that bears her grapes and seeks nothing more when once she has done her work and ripened her fruit.A man who has done a good deed should be like a horse that has run its race, a dog that has tracked its game, or a bee that has gathered its honey : in other words, he ought not to proclaim it from the house-tops, but go seek an opportunity to do likewise ; just as our vine proceeds once more to bear her grapes in the season.
The measure of man's life is a point, substance a perpetual ebb and flow, sense-perception vague and shadowy, the fabric of his whole body corruptible, the soul past searching out, fortune a whirligig, and fame the decision of unreason. In brief, the things of the body are unstable as water ; the things of the soul dreams and vapours ; life itself a warfare or a sojourning in a strange land. What then shall be our guide and escort ?

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE chatter, and an unassuming bearing. See how many gifts are within thy reach at any and every moment ! In none of these does what is excuse of natural incapacity avail ; yet thou still fearest to rise ! Can natural incapacity compel thee to a grumbling, miserly life of toadyism, to abuse of thy poor body, flattery, ostentation, and perpetual restlessness of soul ? Heaven forfend ! Say, rather, all this might have been banished long ago. what is utmost that 'natural incapacity' can do-if even so much as this-is to earn thee a measure of contempt for slowness of comprehension and a certain hebetude of intellect. And it is thy part to minimize even this by careful training, not to look on dullness either as a thing unworthy serious thought or as a fit object for complacent pride. It is what is nature of some men, when they have behaved especially well to a fellow creature, to sit down and cast up on what is spot what is debt of gratitude due to them. Others are not quite so premature, yet, in their hearts, look on what is beneficiaire as in some sort their debtor, and are perfectly conscious of what they have done. Then comes what is man who, so to say, has no conception that he has done anything whatever, but may be compared to what is vine that bears her grapes and seeks nothing more when once she has done her work and ripened her fruit.A man who has done a good deed should be like a horse that has run its race, a dog that has tracked its game, or a bee that has gathered its honey : in other words, he ought not to proclaim it from what is house-tops, but go seek an opportunity to do likewise ; just as our vine proceeds once more to bear her grapes in what is season. what is measure of man's life is a point, substance a perpetual ebb and flow, sense-perception vague and shadowy, what is fabric of his whole body corruptible, what is soul past searching out, fortune a whirligig, and fame what is decision of unreason. In brief, what is things of what is body are unstable as water ; what is things of what is soul dreams and vapours ; life itself a warfare or a sojourning in a strange land. What then shall be our guide and escort ? where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 88 where is p align="center" where is strong THE STOICS : MARCUS AURELIUS where is p align="justify" chatter, and an unassuming bearing. See how many gifts are within thy reach at any and every moment ! In none of these does what is excuse of natural incapacity avail ; yet thou still fearest to rise ! Can natural incapacity compel thee to a grumbling, miserly life of toadyism, to abuse of thy poor body, flattery, ostentation, and perpetual restlessness of soul ? Heaven forfend ! Say, rather, all this might have been banished long ago. The utmost that 'natural incapacity' can do-if even so much as this-is to earn thee a measure of contempt for slowness of comprehension and a certain hebetude of intellect. And it is thy part to minimize even this by careful training, not to look on dullness either as a thing unworthy serious thought or as a fit object for complacent pride. It is what is nature of some men, when they have behaved especially well to a fellow creature, to sit down and cast up on what is spot what is debt of gratitude due to them. Others are not quite so premature, yet, in their hearts, look on what is beneficiaire as in some sort their debtor, and are perfectly conscious of what they have done. Then comes what is man who, so to say, has no conception that he has done anything whatever, but may be compared to what is vine that bears her grapes and seeks nothing more when once she has done her work and ripened her fruit.A man who has done a good deed should be like a horse that has run its race, a dog that has tracked its game, or a bee that has gathered its honey : in other words, he ought not to proclaim it from what is house-tops, but go seek an opportunity to do likewise ; just as our vine proceeds once more to bear her grapes in what is season. what is measure of man's life is a point, substance a perpetual ebb and flow, sense-perception vague and shadowy, what is fabric of his whole body corruptible, what is soul past searching out, fortune a whirligig, and fame what is decision of unreason. In brief, what is things of what is body are unstable as water ; what is things of what is soul dreams and vapours ; life itself a warfare or a sojourning in a strange land. What then shall be our guide and escort ? where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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