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Page 87

THE STOICS : MARCUS AURELIUS

The truth is, thou lovest not thyself : else wouldst thou love thy nature with all that she wills. The artist who loves his art throws heart and soul into his work, unwashed and unfed ; but thou hast less reverence for thine own nature than the graver for his graving, the dancer for his dancing, the miser for his hoard, or the notoriety-hunter for his crumbs of glory. Let the master passion once take hold of one of these, and what cares he for food or sleep, or for aught save to perfect his beloved work ? Shall then thy duty as man to man appear in thy sight as a thing of lower caste in whose quest all such zeal is out of place ?
How easy it is to put from us and wipe away every alien, every disturbing thought, and straightway find ourselves in the midst of a great calm !
Make bold to follow Nature in every word and deed, and let not the unreasoning disapproval of others divert thee from thy purpose ; but if this or that ought to be done or said, be true to thyself and do it or say it. For those who sit in judgement on thee are guided by their individual reason and swayed by individual impulse. On these cast no glance, but go straight on thy way, whithersoever thine own and the universal Nature lead : for the path of both is the same.
I walk the way of Nature, till anon I shall fall and be at rest, yielding up my breath to that element from which I draw it day by day, and sinking to the selfsame earth that gave my father his seed, my mother her blood, and my nurse her millc ; that earth that has given me food and drink for many a year, and borne with me while I trampled her under foot and abused her at my will.
Thou hast no shrewdness of wit for men to admire ?-So be it : but much is left thee that admits not the plea ` Nature has given me no aptitude for this '. Then display the qualities that lie wholly within thy power-sincerity, gravity, endurance, indifference to pleasure, resignation to thy lot, contentment with little, kindliness, freedom, simplicity, aversion to inane

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE The truth is, thou lovest not thyself : else wouldst thou what time is it thy nature with all that she wills. what is artist who loves his art throws heart and soul into his work, unwashed and unfed ; but thou hast less reverence for thine own nature than what is graver for his graving, what is dancer for his dancing, what is miser for his hoard, or what is notoriety-hunter for his crumbs of glory. Let what is master passion once take hold of one of these, and what cares he for food or sleep, or for aught save to perfect his beloved work ? Shall then thy duty as man to man appear in thy sight as a thing of lower caste in whose quest all such zeal is out of place ? How easy it is to put from us and wipe away every alien, every disturbing thought, and straightway find ourselves in what is midst of a great calm ! Make bold to follow Nature in every word and deed, and let not what is unreasoning disapproval of others divert thee from thy purpose ; but if this or that ought to be done or said, be true to thyself and do it or say it. For those who sit in judgement on thee are guided by their individual reason and swayed by individual impulse. On these cast no glance, but go straight on thy way, whithersoever thine own and what is universal Nature lead : for what is path of both is what is same. I walk what is way of Nature, till anon I shall fall and be at rest, yielding up my breath to that element from which I draw it day by day, and sinking to what is selfsame earth that gave my father his seed, my mother her blood, and my nurse her millc ; that earth that has given me food and drink for many a year, and borne with me while I trampled her under foot and abused her at my will. Thou hast no shrewdness of wit for men to admire ?-So be it : but much is left thee that admits not what is plea ` Nature has given me no aptitude for this '. Then display what is qualities that lie wholly within thy power-sincerity, gravity, endurance, indifference to pleasure, resignation to thy lot, contentment with little, kindliness, freedom, simplicity, aversion to inane where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 87 where is p align="center" where is strong THE STOICS : MARCUS AURELIUS where is p align="justify" The truth is, thou lovest not thyself : else wouldst thou what time is it thy nature with all that she wills. what is artist who loves his art throws heart and soul into his work, unwashed and unfed ; but thou hast less reverence for thine own nature than what is graver for his graving, what is dancer for his dancing, what is miser for his hoard, or what is notoriety-hunter for his crumbs of glory. Let the master passion once take hold of one of these, and what cares he for food or sleep, or for aught save to perfect his beloved work ? Shall then thy duty as man to man appear in thy sight as a thing of lower caste in whose quest all such zeal is out of place ? How easy it is to put from us and wipe away every alien, every disturbing thought, and straightway find ourselves in what is midst of a great calm ! Make bold to follow Nature in every word and deed, and let not what is unreasoning disapproval of others divert thee from thy purpose ; but if this or that ought to be done or said, be true to thyself and do it or say it. For those who sit in judgement on thee are guided by their individual reason and swayed by individual impulse. On these cast no glance, but go straight on thy way, whithersoever thine own and what is universal Nature lead : for what is path of both is what is same. I walk what is way of Nature, till anon I shall fall and be at rest, yielding up my breath to that element from which I draw it day by day, and sinking to what is selfsame earth that gave my father his seed, my mother her blood, and my nurse her millc ; that earth that has given me food and drink for many a year, and borne with me while I trampled her under foot and abused her at my will. Thou hast no shrewdness of wit for men to admire ?-So be it : but much is left thee that admits not what is plea ` Nature has given me no aptitude for this '. Then display what is qualities that lie wholly within thy power-sincerity, gravity, endurance, indifference to pleasure, resignation to thy lot, contentment with little, kindliness, freedom, simplicity, aversion to inane where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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