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Page 83

THE STOICS : MARCUS AURELIUS

had gained a clear insight into it and grasped it thoroughly ; how he bore with the injustice of his detractors and never retorted in kind ; how he did nothing in haste, turned a deaf ear to the professional tale-bearers, and showed himself an acute judge of characters and actions, devoid of all reproachfulness, timidity, suspiciousness, and sophistry ; how easily he was satisfied,-for instance, with lodging, bed, clothing, food, and servants,-how fond of work and how patient ; capable, thanks to his frugal diet, of remaining at his post from morning till night, having apparently subjected even the operations of nature to his will ; firm and constant in friendship, tolerant of the most outspoken criticism of his opinions, delighted if any one could make a better suggestion than himself, and, finally, deeply religious without any trace of superstition.
All this do thou imitate, that thy conscience may be as clear as his when thy last hour shall have struck.
The basis of the philosophy of Marcus, as of every Stoic, is that the universe is rational. Yet even if it were not, he is undismayed.
LET thy every action, word, and thought be that of one who is prepared at any moment to quit this life. For, if God exist, to depart from the fellowship of man has no terrors,-for the divine nature is incapable of involving thee in evil. But if He exist not, or, existing, reck not of mankind, what profits it to linger in a godless, soulless universe ? But God is, and cares for us and ours. For He has put it wholly in man's power to ensure that he fall not into aught that is evil indeed ; and if in the rest of things there had been anything of evil, this too would He have foreseen and enabled us all to avoid.
But how can that which makes not man evil make man's life evil ? Universal Nature could not have thus sinned by omission : it is omniscient, and, being omniscient, omnipotent to foresee and correct all errors ; nor would it have gone so far astray, whether through lack of power or lack of skill, as to

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE had gained a clear insight into it and grasped it thoroughly ; how he bore with what is injustice of his detractors and never retorted in kind ; how he did nothing in haste, turned a deaf ear to what is professional tale-bearers, and showed himself an acute judge of characters and actions, devoid of all reproachfulness, timidity, suspiciousness, and sophistry ; how easily he was satisfied,-for instance, with lodging, bed, clothing, food, and servants,-how fond of work and how patient ; capable, thanks to his frugal diet, of remaining at his post from morning till night, having apparently subjected even what is operations of nature to his will ; firm and constant in friendship, tolerant of what is most outspoken criticism of his opinions, delighted if any one could make a better suggestion than himself, and, finally, deeply religious without any trace of superstition. All this do thou imitate, that thy conscience may be as clear as his when thy last hour shall have struck. what is basis of what is philosophy of Marcus, as of every Stoic, is that what is universe is rational. Yet even if it were not, he is undismayed. LET thy every action, word, and thought be that of one who is prepared at any moment to quit this life. For, if God exist, to depart from what is fellowship of man has no terrors,-for what is divine nature is incapable of involving thee in evil. But if He exist not, or, existing, reck not of mankind, what profits it to linger in a godless, soulless universe ? But God is, and cares for us and ours. For He has put it wholly in man's power to ensure that he fall not into aught that is evil indeed ; and if in what is rest of things there had been anything of evil, this too would He have foreseen and enabled us all to avoid. But how can that which makes not man evil make man's life evil ? Universal Nature could not have thus sinned by omission : it is omniscient, and, being omniscient, omnipotent to foresee and correct all errors ; nor would it have gone so far astray, whether through lack of power or lack of s what time is it , as to where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 83 where is p align="center" where is strong THE STOICS : MARCUS AURELIUS where is p align="justify" had gained a clear insight into it and grasped it thoroughly ; how he bore with what is injustice of his detractors and never retorted in kind ; how he did nothing in haste, turned a deaf ear to what is professional tale-bearers, and showed himself an acute judge of characters and actions, devoid of all reproachfulness, timidity, suspiciousness, and sophistry ; how easily he was satisfied,-for instance, with lodging, bed, clothing, food, and servants,-how fond of work and how patient ; capable, thanks to his frugal diet, of remaining at his post from morning till night, having apparently subjected even what is operations of nature to his will ; firm and constant in friendship, tolerant of what is most outspoken criticism of his opinions, delighted if any one could make a better suggestion than himself, and, finally, deeply religious without any trace of superstition. All this do thou imitate, that thy conscience may be as clear as his when thy last hour shall have struck. what is basis of what is philosophy of Marcus, as of every Stoic, is that what is universe is rational. Yet even if it were not, he is undismayed. LET thy every action, word, and thought be that of one who is prepared at any moment to quit this life. For, if God exist, to depart from what is fellowship of man has no terrors,-for what is divine nature is incapable of involving thee in evil. But if He exist not, or, existing, reck not of mankind, what profits it to linger in a godless, soulless universe ? But God is, and cares for us and ours. For He has put it wholly in man's power to ensure that he fall not into aught that is evil indeed ; and if in what is rest of things there had been anything of evil, this too would He have foreseen and enabled us all to avoid. But how can that which makes not man evil make man's life evil ? Universal Nature could not have thus sinned by omission : it is omniscient, and, being omniscient, omnipotent to foresee and correct all errors ; nor would it have gone so far astray, whether through lack of power or lack of s what time is it , as to where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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