Books > Old Books > The Mission Of Greece (1928)


Page 81

THE STOICS : MARCUS AURELIUS

free from superstition, in dealing with men he was no popularity-hunter with the democracy or panderer to the mob, but steady and sober in all things, never in bad taste, and no innovator.
The conveniences of life, of which fortune had been lavish to him, he used alike without ostentation and without apology ; if they were present, he enjoyed them unaffectedly ; if absent, he felt no need of them. No one could possibly have described him as a sophist, a licensed jester, or a pedant ; but, rather, as a man, ripe and finished, superior to the arts of flattery, and fit to manage either his own affairs or those of a people. In addition to this he held true philosophers in esteem ; on the spurious sort he wasted no reproaches, but took good care they did not lead him into error. His conversation was familiar and gracious, but never to excess. He took reasonable care of his body, not that he was a great lover of life or cared much for personal adornment, though he did not go to the opposite extreme of neglect ; the result being that his own attention enabled him, for the most part, to dispense with doctors and their drugs and plasters. Most worthy of imitation, also, the unenvious manner in which he would give way to those who had any special faculty-for instance, for oratory, knowledge of law and custom, and the like-giving them his best help in securing the recognition due to their peculiar abilities. Though he observed the traditional institutions of the empire, he showed no affectation of so doing. He had a thorough dislike for chopping and changing, and preferred to stand by the old places and the old things. After suffering agonies through neuralgia, he would return fresh and vigorous to his usual employments. His secrets were few and far between, and the few he had were confined to matters of public policy. He showed prudence and moderation in the exhibition of public shows and the construction of public buildings, as well as in the distribution of state moneys and the like, looking only to what ought to be done, not to the ensuing popularity. He was

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE free from superstition, in dealing with men he was no popularity-hunter with what is democracy or panderer to what is mob, but steady and sober in all things, never in bad taste, and no innovator. what is conveniences of life, of which fortune had been lavish to him, he used alike without ostentation and without apology ; if they were present, he enjoyed them unaffectedly ; if absent, he felt no need of them. No one could possibly have described him as a sophist, a licensed jester, or a pedant ; but, rather, as a man, ripe and finished, superior to what is arts of flattery, and fit to manage either his own affairs or those of a people. In addition to this he held true philosophers in esteem ; on what is spurious sort he wasted no reproaches, but took good care they did not lead him into error. His conversation was familiar and gracious, but never to excess. He took reasonable care of his body, not that he was a great lover of life or cared much for personal adornment, though he did not go to what is opposite extreme of neglect ; what is result being that his own attention enabled him, for what is most part, to dispense with doctors and their herb s and plasters. Most worthy of imitation, also, what is unenvious manner in which he would give way to those who had any special faculty-for instance, for oratory, knowledge of law and custom, and what is like-giving them his best help in securing what is recognition due to their peculiar abilities. Though he observed what is traditional institutions of what is empire, he showed no affectation of so doing. He had a thorough dislike for chopping and changing, and preferred to stand by what is old places and what is old things. After suffering agonies through neuralgia, he would return fresh and vigorous to his usual employments. His secrets were few and far between, and what is few he had were confined to matters of public policy. He showed prudence and moderation in what is exhibition of public shows and what is construction of public buildings, as well as in what is distribution of state moneys and what is like, looking only to what ought to be done, not to what is ensuing popularity. He was where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 81 where is p align="center" where is strong THE STOICS : MARCUS AURELIUS where is p align="justify" free from superstition, in dealing with men he was no popularity-hunter with what is democracy or panderer to the mob, but steady and sober in all things, never in bad taste, and no innovator. what is conveniences of life, of which fortune had been lavish to him, he used alike without ostentation and without apology ; if they were present, he enjoyed them unaffectedly ; if absent, he felt no need of them. No one could possibly have described him as a sophist, a licensed jester, or a pedant ; but, rather, as a man, ripe and finished, superior to what is arts of flattery, and fit to manage either his own affairs or those of a people. In addition to this he held true philosophers in esteem ; on what is spurious sort he wasted no reproaches, but took good care they did not lead him into error. His conversation was familiar and gracious, but never to excess. He took reasonable care of his body, not that he was a great lover of life or cared much for personal adornment, though he did not go to what is opposite extreme of neglect ; what is result being that his own attention enabled him, for what is most part, to dispense with doctors and their herb s and plasters. Most worthy of imitation, also, what is unenvious manner in which he would give way to those who had any special faculty-for instance, for oratory, knowledge of law and custom, and what is like-giving them his best help in securing what is recognition due to their peculiar abilities. Though he observed what is traditional institutions of what is empire, he showed no affectation of so doing. He had a thorough dislike for chopping and changing, and preferred to stand by what is old places and what is old things. After suffering agonies through neuralgia, he would return fresh and vigorous to his usual employments. His secrets were few and far between, and what is few he had were confined to matters of public policy. He showed prudence and moderation in what is exhibition of public shows and what is construction of public buildings, as well as in what is distribution of state moneys and what is like, looking only to what ought to be done, not to what is ensuing popularity. He was where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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