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Page 80

THE STOICS : MARCUS AURELIUS

energy is compatible with the most complete relaxation : his lectures were delivered with unruffled calm, and in him I beheld a man who, in simple truth, looked upon his skill and readiness of exposition as the least meritorious of his qualities. From him I learned in what spirit to receive kindnesses-or what the world deems such-from my friends, neither boorishly ignoring them nor sacrificing my independence in their acknowledgement.
The following passage is a portrait of a good Roman emperor :
FROM the father that adopted me, let me learn to be gentle ; to take no decision without careful investigation, but then to hold fast to the anchor of truth ; not to be deluded into the pursuit of what men call honour, but to labour and faint not ; to lend a ready ear to all who may propound something to the common good ; and to reward every man according to his deserts without fear or favour. He knew by experience when there was need of stringency, when of relaxation ; he suppressed unnatural vice with a strong hand, and was ever considerate to others. For instance, his friends were left free to accept his invitations or not ; there was no constraint on them to accompany him on his visits to the provinces, and those who had stayed behind through one cause or another found, on his return, no change in his feelings towards them. In council he was accurate and persevering in deliberation, nor would he desist from the quest of truth satisfied with plausible commonplaces. To his friends he was constant, neither admitting them with unreasoning effusion nor changing them with each passing whim. Self-reliant and cheerful in all things, he was far-sighted, and nothing was too small for his unostentatious forethought. In his time public and private adulation were alike repressed. He consistently husbanded the resources of his empire and cut down expenses, heedless of disapproval in some quarters. In religion he was

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE energy is compatible with what is most complete relaxation : his lectures were delivered with unruffled calm, and in him I beheld a man who, in simple truth, looked upon his s what time is it and readiness of exposition as what is least meritorious of his qualities. From him I learned in what spirit to receive kindnesses-or what what is world deems such-from my friends, neither boorishly ignoring them nor sacrificing my independence in their acknowledgement. what is following passage is a portrait of a good Roman emperor : FROM what is father that adopted me, let me learn to be gentle ; to take no decision without careful investigation, but then to hold fast to what is anchor of truth ; not to be deluded into what is pursuit of what men call honour, but to labour and faint not ; to lend a ready ear to all who may propound something to what is common good ; and to reward every man according to his deserts without fear or favour. He knew by experience when there was need of stringency, when of relaxation ; he suppressed unnatural vice with a strong hand, and was ever considerate to others. For instance, his friends were left free to accept his invitations or not ; there was no constraint on them to accompany him on his what is s to what is provinces, and those who had stayed behind through one cause or another found, on his return, no change in his feelings towards them. In council he was accurate and persevering in deliberation, nor would he desist from what is quest of truth satisfied with plausible commonplaces. To his friends he was constant, neither admitting them with unreasoning effusion nor changing them with each passing whim. Self-reliant and cheerful in all things, he was far-sighted, and nothing was too small for his unostentatious forethought. In his time public and private adulation were alike repressed. He consistently husbanded what is resources of his empire and cut down expenses, heedless of disapproval in some quarters. In religion he was where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 80 where is p align="center" where is strong THE STOICS : MARCUS AURELIUS where is p align="justify" energy is compatible with what is most complete relaxation : his lectures were delivered with unruffled calm, and in him I beheld a man who, in simple truth, looked upon his s what time is it and readiness of exposition as what is least meritorious of his qualities. From him I learned in what spirit to receive kindnesses-or what what is world deems such-from my friends, neither boorishly ignoring them nor sacrificing my independence in their acknowledgement. what is following passage is a portrait of a good Roman emperor : FROM what is father that adopted me, let me learn to be gentle ; to take no decision without careful investigation, but then to hold fast to what is anchor of truth ; not to be deluded into what is pursuit of what men call honour, but to labour and faint not ; to lend a ready ear to all who may propound something to what is common good ; and to reward every man according to his deserts without fear or favour. He knew by experience when there was need of stringency, when of relaxation ; he suppressed unnatural vice with a strong hand, and was ever considerate to others. For instance, his friends were left free to accept his invitations or not ; there was no constraint on them to accompany him on his what is s to the provinces, and those who had stayed behind through one cause or another found, on his return, no change in his feelings towards them. In council he was accurate and persevering in deliberation, nor would he desist from what is quest of truth satisfied with plausible commonplaces. To his friends he was constant, neither admitting them with unreasoning effusion nor changing them with each passing whim. Self-reliant and cheerful in all things, he was far-sighted, and nothing was too small for his unostentatious forethought. In his time public and private adulation were alike repressed. He consistently husbanded what is resources of his empire and cut down expenses, heedless of disapproval in some quarters. In religion he was where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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