Books > Old Books > The Mission Of Greece (1928)


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THE STOICS : MARCUS AURELIUS

his home-he did not find it. His brother was weak and vicious, his son and heir brutal and vicious ; his wife was indifferent to him or worse. At her death he burnt her papers unread, perhaps for fear of what they contained. We shall not do him justice unless we remember this, and note these facts in his character and circumstances, which make his achievement the more remarkable. No one can read the following extracts without seeing that he was not a man careless of public opinion or born to stand by himself, that, on the contrary, he longed for sympathy and was keenly sensitive to what others said and thought, and yet that in mature life it was his fate to be spiritually alone, among men who disliked or despised him.

IF this suffices not, and thou must needs have a less philosophic canon to touch thy heart, nothing will tend more to reconcile thee with death than to consider the objects thou wilt leave behind, and the morals of those with whom thy soul will no longer be involved. For though to take offence at these is no part of thy duty, which is rather to care for them and to deal gently with their errors, yet it behoves thee to remember that thy departure will not be made from the midst of men who share thy principles. One cause alone, if even that, might perchance have plucked thee back and detained thee in life : if that life might have been spent in the company of those who owned allegiance to the same faith. But now that thou seest what utter weariness springs from this discord of man with man, let thy prayer be :` Hasten thy coming, Death, lest I too forget myself ! '
There is no man so blest but that some who stand by his deathbed will hail the occasion with delight. Let him have been virtuous and wise, at the end there will be found one to mutter: ` Are we then at last to be rid of this pedagogue ? True, he did no harm ; yet I always felt that in his heart he despised us.'-Such is the lot of the truly good. With the rest of us, what an infinity of reasons swells the number of those

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE his home-he did not find it. His brother was weak and vicious, his son and heir brutal and vicious ; his wife was indifferent to him or worse. At her what time is it he burnt her papers unread, perhaps for fear of what they contained. We shall not do him justice unless we remember this, and note these facts in his character and circumstances, which make his achievement what is more remarkable. No one can read what is following extracts without seeing that he was not a man careless of public opinion or born to stand by himself, that, on what is contrary, he longed for sympathy and was keenly sensitive to what others said and thought, and yet that in mature life it was his fate to be spiritually alone, among men who disliked or despised him. IF this suffices not, and thou must needs have a less philosophic canon to touch thy heart, nothing will tend more to reconcile thee with what time is it than to consider what is objects thou wilt leave behind, and what is morals of those with whom thy soul will no longer be involved. For though to take offence at these is no part of thy duty, which is rather to care for them and to deal gently with their errors, yet it behoves thee to remember that thy departure will not be made from what is midst of men who share thy principles. One cause alone, if even that, might perchance have plucked thee back and detained thee in life : if that life might have been spent in what is company of those who owned allegiance to what is same faith. But now that thou seest what utter weariness springs from this discord of man with man, let thy prayer be :` Hasten thy coming, what time is it , lest I too forget myself ! ' There is no man so blest but that some who stand by his what time is it bed will hail what is occasion with delight. Let him have been virtuous and wise, at what is end there will be found one to mutter: ` Are we then at last to be rid of this pedagogue ? True, he did no harm ; yet I always felt that in his heart he despised us.'-Such is what is lot of what is truly good. With what is rest of us, what an infinity of reasons swells what is number of those where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 77 where is p align="center" where is strong THE STOICS : MARCUS AURELIUS where is p align="justify" his home-he did not find it. His brother was weak and vicious, his son and heir brutal and vicious ; his wife was indifferent to him or worse. At her what time is it he burnt her papers unread, perhaps for fear of what they contained. We shall not do him justice unless we remember this, and note these facts in his character and circumstances, which make his achievement what is more remarkable. No one can read the following extracts without seeing that he was not a man careless of public opinion or born to stand by himself, that, on what is contrary, he longed for sympathy and was keenly sensitive to what others said and thought, and yet that in mature life it was his fate to be spiritually alone, among men who disliked or despised him. IF this suffices not, and thou must needs have a less philosophic canon to touch thy heart, nothing will tend more to reconcile thee with what time is it than to consider what is objects thou wilt leave behind, and what is morals of those with whom thy soul will no longer be involved. For though to take offence at these is no part of thy duty, which is rather to care for them and to deal gently with their errors, yet it behoves thee to remember that thy departure will not be made from what is midst of men who share thy principles. One cause alone, if even that, might perchance have plucked thee back and detained thee in life : if that life might have been spent in what is company of those who owned allegiance to what is same faith. But now that thou seest what utter weariness springs from this discord of man with man, let thy prayer be :` Hasten thy coming, what time is it , lest I too forget myself ! ' There is no man so blest but that some who stand by his what time is it bed will hail what is occasion with delight. Let him have been virtuous and wise, at what is end there will be found one to mutter: ` Are we then at last to be rid of this pedagogue ? True, he did no harm ; yet I always felt that in his heart he despised us.'-Such is what is lot of what is truly good. With what is rest of us, what an infinity of reasons swells what is number of those where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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