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Page 76

THE STOICS : MARCUS AURELIUS

It is an odd letter, not without charm, but emotional and rather priggish-a schoolgirl's letter rather than a schoolboy's. Certainly it does not suggest that the writer was born to hold in his hands the destinies of the civilized world. Yet the youth who wrote it was Marcus Aurelius, who for nineteen years was Emperor of Rome. Nature did not cast him for the part. He was full of literary and studious enthusiasms. We hear of him fasting, sleeping on the ground with a single covering, reading at the great shows in the amphitheatre, and even at dinner when company was present. Nor is his education exactly what we expect for a future monarch. The simplicity of it ; the numerous teachers of philosophy, belonging to the Stoic school, whose most famous men in the past had been steady republicans, and many of whom had lost their lives for their opinions ; the absence of any military or administrative training-none of this prepares us for what Marcus became. A born monk or man of letters, one would have said, never intended for the rough work of leading armies and ruling an empire. Indeed, he is a classical example of a man set to do work for which his tastes unfitted him, and doing it well.
Now glance at the work to which he was called when at the age of thirty-nine he became ruler of the Roman world. No emperor since Augustus had had to face so formidable a task. Six years after his accession the first waves of those invasions which were to destroy the Empire broke on its frontiers. There was fighting in Britain, fighting in Germany, fighting in the East, and still worse fighting on the Danube, where Germans and Slavs poured across to the gates of Italy. This philosopher who loved peace had to exchange his books for the sword. He spent most of the last thirteen years of his life at the war, and died in camp at Vienna on the 17th of March A. D. 180. To war were added famines and repeated visitations of plague. The emperor had poor health : he was set to do work which he hated, and worst of all he was absolutely alone. His nature, as that early letter shows, was affectionate and clinging : as a young man he had congenial friendships and a happy home. But it was otherwise in his later life and days of trial. Monarchs and saints are apt, for different reasons, to be solitary. Philosophers in an army seem out of place. Marcus was monarch, saint, and philosopher. In the one place where he might have found companionship

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE It is an odd letter, not without charm, but emotional and rather priggish-a schoolgirl's letter rather than a schoolboy's. Certainly it does not suggest that what is writer was born to hold in his hands what is destinies of what is civilized world. Yet what is youth who wrote it was Marcus Aurelius, who for nineteen years was Emperor of Rome. Nature did not cast him for what is part. He was full of literary and studious enthusiasms. We hear of him fasting, sleeping on what is ground with a single covering, reading at what is great shows in what is amphitheatre, and even at dinner when company was present. Nor is his education exactly what we expect for a future monarch. what is simplicity of it ; what is numerous teachers of philosophy, belonging to what is Stoic school, whose most famous men in what is past had been steady republicans, and many of whom had lost their lives for their opinions ; what is absence of any military or administrative training-none of this prepares us for what Marcus became. A born monk or man of letters, one would have said, never intended for what is rough work of leading armies and ruling an empire. Indeed, he is a classical example of a man set to do work for which his tastes unfitted him, and doing it well. Now glance at what is work to which he was called when at what is age of thirty-nine he became ruler of what is Roman world. No emperor since Augustus had had to face so formidable a task. Six years after his accession what is first waves of those invasions which were to destroy what is Empire broke on its frontiers. There was fighting in Britain, fighting in Germany, fighting in what is East, and still worse fighting on what is Danube, where Germans and Slavs poured across to what is gates of Italy. This philosopher who loved peace had to exchange his books for what is sword. He spent most of what is last thirteen years of his life at what is war, and died in camp at Vienna on what is 17th of March a. D. 180. To war were added famines and repeated what is ations of plague. what is emperor had poor health : he was set to do work which he hated, and worst of all he was absolutely alone. His nature, as that early letter shows, was affectionate and clinging : as a young man he had congenial friendships and a happy home. But it was otherwise in his later life and days of trial. Monarchs and saints are apt, for different reasons, to be solitary. Philosophers in an army seem out of place. Marcus was monarch, saint, and philosopher. In what is one place where he might have found companionship where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 76 where is p align="center" where is strong THE STOICS : MARCUS AURELIUS where is p align="justify" It is an odd letter, not without charm, but emotional and rather priggish-a schoolgirl's letter rather than a schoolboy's. Certainly it does not suggest that what is writer was born to hold in his hands what is destinies of what is civilized world. Yet what is youth who wrote it was Marcus Aurelius, who for nineteen years was Emperor of Rome. Nature did not cast him for what is part. He was full of literary and studious enthusiasms. We hear of him fasting, sleeping on the ground with a single covering, reading at what is great shows in the amphitheatre, and even at dinner when company was present. Nor is his education exactly what we expect for a future monarch. The simplicity of it ; what is numerous teachers of philosophy, belonging to what is Stoic school, whose most famous men in what is past had been steady republicans, and many of whom had lost their lives for their opinions ; what is absence of any military or administrative training-none of this prepares us for what Marcus became. A born monk or man of letters, one would have said, never intended for what is rough work of leading armies and ruling an empire. Indeed, he is a classical example of a man set to do work for which his tastes unfitted him, and doing it well. Now glance at what is work to which he was called when at what is age of thirty-nine he became ruler of what is Roman world. No emperor since Augustus had had to face so formidable a task. Six years after his accession what is first waves of those invasions which were to destroy what is Empire broke on its frontiers. There was fighting in Britain, fighting in Germany, fighting in what is East, and still worse fighting on what is Danube, where Germans and Slavs poured across to what is gates of Italy. This philosopher who loved peace had to exchange his books for what is sword. He spent most of what is last thirteen years of his life at what is war, and died in camp at Vienna on what is 17th of March A. D. 180. To war were added famines and repeated what is ations of plague. what is emperor had poor health : he was set to do work which he hated, and worst of all he was absolutely alone. His nature, as that early letter shows, was affectionate and clinging : as a young man he had congenial friendships and a happy home. But it was otherwise in his later life and days of trial. Monarchs and saints are apt, for different reasons, to be solitary. Philosophers in an army seem out of place. Marcus was monarch, saint, and philosopher. In what is one place where he might have found companionship where is center where is img src="page_076.jpg" width="241" height="368" where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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