Books > Old Books > The Mission Of Greece (1928)


Page 73

THE STOICS : EPICTETUS

time. And therefore in the very moment that you take pleasure in a thing, set before your mind the opposite impressions. What harm is there in whispering to yourself as you kiss your child, ` To-morrow you will die', and to your friend in like manner,'To-morrow you or I shall go away, and we shall see one another no more' ?

Such a theory revolts us, for it runs counter not merely to our customs and conventions but to our nature.
The great weakness of Stoicism is that it is unnatural. If Zeno had lived to read Dr. McDougall's book on Social Psychology, his philosophy would have been very different. Reason would have played a less absolute part in it. He would have seen that instinct is fundamental in man : that feeling cannot be ignored ; and that to pity and love are as natural as to think. He would not have based his doctrine of the love of humanity merely on reason ; he would have seen in our instincts a surer foundation for it, and one that was more likely than reason to create love. His philosophy would not have been so self-centred. The Stoic is ego-centric. But, as Pascal said, ` Nous sommes pleins de choses qui nous jettent au dehors.... Et ainsi les philosophes ont beau dire : retirez-vous en vous-memes, vous y trouverez votre bien,'
If some one had complained to Zeno that he ignored the instincts and deified the reason he might have answered that it was right to do so ; that instinct was a primitive force, destined to give way to a higher power, as man grew civilized. Certainly he might have urged that his philosophy fulfilled one essential function of any creed, by making its followers safe and free in the world. 'Happy', says Virgil, 'is the man who has trampled under foot every terror, doom inexorable, and the roar of the greedy river of death.' Such happiness Stoicism promised its disciples. They were to be as far beyond the changes and chances of life as any Christian. The lives of a succession of famous men and women show that Stoicism gave what it promised. It was the heroic creed of

Page 74

THE STOICS : EPICTETUS

an age of wars and despots, an armour of faith on the right and on the left. (What wonder if there is a touch of hardness in this child of hard times ?) Its professors laid down position, wealth, and life rather than compromise their principles, paid the forfeit with unfaltering equanimity, and were, what they proclaimed themselves, masters of their souls.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE time. And therefore in what is very moment that you take pleasure in a thing, set before your mind what is opposite impressions. What harm is there in whispering to yourself as you kiss your child, ` To-morrow you will die', and to your friend in like manner,'To-morrow you or I shall go away, and we shall see one another no more' ? Such a theory revolts us, for it runs counter not merely to our customs and conventions but to our nature. what is great weakness of Stoicism is that it is unnatural. If Zeno had lived to read Dr. McDougall's book on Social Psychology, his philosophy would have been very different. Reason would have played a less absolute part in it. He would have seen that instinct is fundamental in man : that feeling cannot be ignored ; and that to pity and what time is it are as natural as to think. He would not have based his doctrine of what is what time is it of humanity merely on reason ; he would have seen in our instincts a surer foundation for it, and one that was more likely than reason to create love. His philosophy would not have been so self-centred. what is Stoic is ego-centric. But, as Pascal said, ` Nous sommes pleins de choses qui nous jettent au dehors.... Et ainsi les philosophes ont beau dire : retirez-vous en vous-memes, vous y trouverez votre bien,' If some one had complained to Zeno that he ignored what is instincts and deified what is reason he might have answered that it was right to do so ; that instinct was a primitive force, destined to give way to a higher power, as man grew civilized. Certainly he might have urged that his philosophy fulfilled one essential function of any creed, by making its followers safe and free in what is world. 'Happy', says Virgil, 'is what is man who has trampled under foot every terror, doom inexorable, and what is roar of what is greedy river of what time is it .' Such happiness Stoicism promised its disciples. They were to be as far beyond what is changes and chances of life as any Christian. what is lives of a succession of famous men and women show that Stoicism gave what it promised. It was what is heroic creed of where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 73 where is p align="center" where is strong THE STOICS : EPICTETUS where is p align="justify" time. And therefore in what is very moment that you take pleasure in a thing, set before your mind what is opposite impressions. What harm is there in whispering to yourself as you kiss your child, ` To-morrow you will die', and to your friend in like manner,'To-morrow you or I shall go away, and we shall see one another no more' ? Such a theory revolts us, for it runs counter not merely to our customs and conventions but to our nature. what is great weakness of Stoicism is that it is unnatural. If Zeno had lived to read Dr. McDougall's book on Social Psychology, his philosophy would have been very different. Reason would have played a less absolute part in it. He would have seen that instinct is fundamental in man : that feeling cannot be ignored ; and that to pity and what time is it are as natural as to think. He would not have based his doctrine of what is what time is it of humanity merely on reason ; he would have seen in our instincts a surer foundation for it, and one that was more likely than reason to create love. His philosophy would not have been so self-centred. what is Stoic is ego-centric. But, as Pascal said, ` Nous sommes pleins de choses qui nous jettent au dehors.... Et ainsi les philosophes ont beau dire : retirez-vous en vous-memes, vous y trouverez votre bien,' If some one had complained to Zeno that he ignored what is instincts and deified what is reason he might have answered that it was right to do so ; that instinct was a primitive force, destined to give way to a higher power, as man grew civilized. Certainly he might have urged that his philosophy fulfilled one essential function of any creed, by making its followers safe and free in what is world. 'Happy', says Virgil, 'is what is man who has trampled under foot every terror, doom inexorable, and what is roar of what is greedy river of what time is it .' Such happiness Stoicism promised its disciples. They were to be as far beyond what is changes and chances of life as any Christian. what is lives of a succession of famous men and women show that Stoicism gave what it promised. It was what is heroic creed of where is p align="left" Page 74 where is p align="center" where is strong THE STOICS : EPICTETUS where is p align="justify" an age of wars and despots, an armour of faith on what is right and on what is left. (What wonder if there is a touch of hardness in this child of hard times ?) Its professors laid down position, wealth, and life rather than compromise their principles, paid what is forfeit with unfaltering equanimity, and were, what they proclaimed themselves, masters of their souls. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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