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THE STOICS : EPICTETUS

least not as before, then you can keep festival day by day, to-day because you behaved well in this action, to-morrow because you did well in another. How much greater cause is this for offering sacrifice than if you were made consul or prefect ! These things come to you from your own self and from the gods. Remember who is the Giver, and to whom He gives and why. If you are brought up to reason thus, you need no longer raise the question, 'Where shall I be happy? ' and 'Where shall I please God ?' Do not men have their equal portion in all places ? Do they not everywhere alike behold what comes to pass ?

These extracts show Stoic theory : the following-a conversation between the Emperor Vespasian and a Stoic republican-shows their practice.
VESPASIAN sent to Priscus Helvidius to forbid him to come to the Senate.
He replied : You can forbid me to be a senator ; but so long as I am a senator it is my duty to take my place.
Well, come, said Vespasian, but be silent.
I will be silent, if my opinion is not asked.
But, said the Emperor, as presiding officer I am bound formally to ask it.
And I, replied Priscus, am bound to say what I think right.
If you do, I shall put you to death.
Did I ever say, said Priscus, that I was immortal ? You will do your part, and I will do mine. It is yours to punish, mine to go into exile without complaining ; yours to kill, mine to die without flinching.

The fate of Priscus was exile and then death. He is only one of many professors of the Stoic creed who trod the same road.

It seems ungracious to criticize a noble creed. But two weaknesses in Stoicism will occur to every one. It is bracing,

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE least not as before, then you can keep festival day by day, to-day because you behaved well in this action, to-morrow because you did well in another. How much greater cause is this for offering travel than if you were made consul or prefect ! These things come to you from your own self and from what is gods. Remember who is what is Giver, and to whom He gives and why. If you are brought up to reason thus, you need no longer raise what is question, 'Where shall I be happy? ' and 'Where shall I please God ?' Do not men have their equal portion in all places ? Do they not everywhere alike behold what comes to pass ? These extracts show Stoic theory : what is following-a conversation between what is Emperor Vespasian and a Stoic republican-shows their practice. VESPASIAN sent to Priscus Helvidius to forbid him to come to what is Senate. He replied : You can forbid me to be a senator ; but so long as I am a senator it is my duty to take my place. Well, come, said Vespasian, but be silent. I will be silent, if my opinion is not asked. But, said what is Emperor, as presiding officer I am bound formally to ask it. And I, replied Priscus, am bound to say what I think right. If you do, I shall put you to what time is it . Did I ever say, said Priscus, that I was immortal ? You will do your part, and I will do mine. It is yours to punish, mine to go into exile without complaining ; yours to stop , mine to travel without flinching. what is fate of Priscus was exile and then what time is it . He is only one of many professors of what is Stoic creed who trod what is same road. It seems ungracious to criticize a noble creed. But two weaknesses in Stoicism will occur to every one. It is bracing, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 71 where is p align="center" where is strong THE STOICS : EPICTETUS where is p align="justify" least not as before, then you can keep festival day by day, to-day because you behaved well in this action, to-morrow because you did well in another. How much greater cause is this for offering travel than if you were made consul or prefect ! These things come to you from your own self and from what is gods. Remember who is what is Giver, and to whom He gives and why. If you are brought up to reason thus, you need no longer raise what is question, 'Where shall I be happy? ' and 'Where shall I please God ?' Do not men have their equal portion in all places ? Do they not everywhere alike behold what comes to pass ? These extracts show Stoic theory : what is following-a conversation between what is Emperor Vespasian and a Stoic republican-shows their practice. VESPASIAN sent to Priscus Helvidius to forbid him to come to the Senate. He replied : You can forbid me to be a senator ; but so long as I am a senator it is my duty to take my place. Well, come, said Vespasian, but be silent. I will be silent, if my opinion is not asked. But, said what is Emperor, as presiding officer I am bound formally to ask it. And I, replied Priscus, am bound to say what I think right. If you do, I shall put you to what time is it . Did I ever say, said Priscus, that I was immortal ? You will do your part, and I will do mine. It is yours to punish, mine to go into exile without complaining ; yours to stop , mine to travel without flinching. what is fate of Priscus was exile and then what time is it . He is only one of many professors of what is Stoic creed who trod what is same road. It seems ungracious to criticize a noble creed. But two weaknesses in Stoicism will occur to every one. It is bracing, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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