Books > Old Books > The Mission Of Greece (1928)


Page 68

THE STOICS : EPICTETUS

we were to study the will to get and the will to avoid to the end that we may never fail to get what we will nor fall into what we avoid, and study the doctrine of what is fitting that we may remember our true relations and may do nothing irrationally or contrary to what is fitting-then we should not have to suffer vexation at being hindered in regard to the principles we have studied, but should find contentment in acting in accordance with them, and we should cease to calculate as we have been wont to do till to-day, ` To-day I read so many lines, wrote so many', and should reckon thus, ` To-day I governed my impulse by the precepts of the philosophers, I did not entertain desire, I avoided only things within the compass of my will, I was not awed by this man or over-persuaded by that man, but trained my faculty of patience, of abstinence, of co-operation' : and then we should give thanks to God for the gifts for which our thanks are due.
As it is, we do not realize that we too, with a difference, behave like the multitude. Your neighbour fears that he may not become a magistrate, you fear that you may be one. Man, act not so. If you act thus, how shall you be able to say, as Socrates did, ` If God so wills, so be it' ? Do you think that, if Socrates had set his desire on a life of leisure and daily conversation with young men in the Lyceum or the Academy, he would have cheerfully gone on all the campaigns in which he served ? Would he not have groaned and lamented, ` Unhappy that I am, wretched and miserable in the field, when I might be sunning myself in the Lyceum'? What? Was this your task in life, to sun yourself? Was it not to have a mind at peace, to be free from hindrance and encumbrance ? Nay, how would he have been Socrates any more, if he had lamented like that ? How could he have written songs of triumph in prison ?
In a word, then, remember this, that, whenever you pay regard to anything outside your will's control, you so far destroy your will. And freedom from office lies outside your will just as much as office, leisure just as much as business.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE we were to study what is will to get and what is will to avoid to what is end that we may never fail to get what we will nor fall into what we avoid, and study what is doctrine of what is fitting that we may remember our true relations and may do nothing irrationally or contrary to what is fitting-then we should not have to suffer vexation at being hindered in regard to what is principles we have studied, but should find contentment in acting in accordance with them, and we should cease to calculate as we have been wont to do till to-day, ` To-day I read so many lines, wrote so many', and should reckon thus, ` To-day I governed my impulse by what is precepts of what is philosophers, I did not entertain desire, I avoided only things within what is compass of my will, I was not awed by this man or over-persuaded by that man, but trained my faculty of patience, of abstinence, of co-operation' : and then we should give thanks to God for what is gifts for which our thanks are due. As it is, we do not realize that we too, with a difference, behave like what is multitude. Your neighbour fears that he may not become a magistrate, you fear that you may be one. Man, act not so. If you act thus, how shall you be able to say, as Socrates did, ` If God so wills, so be it' ? Do you think that, if Socrates had set his desire on a life of leisure and daily conversation with young men in what is Lyceum or what is Academy, he would have cheerfully gone on all what is campaigns in which he served ? Would he not have groaned and lamented, ` Unhappy that I am, wretched and miserable in what is field, when I might be sunning myself in what is Lyceum'? What? Was this your task in life, to sun yourself? Was it not to have a mind at peace, to be free from hindrance and encumbrance ? Nay, how would he have been Socrates any more, if he had lamented like that ? How could he have written songs of triumph in prison ? In a word, then, remember this, that, whenever you pay regard to anything outside your will's control, you so far destroy your will. And freedom from office lies outside your will just as much as office, leisure just as much as business. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 68 where is p align="center" where is strong THE STOICS : EPICTETUS where is p align="justify" we were to study what is will to get and what is will to avoid to what is end that we may never fail to get what we will nor fall into what we avoid, and study what is doctrine of what is fitting that we may remember our true relations and may do nothing irrationally or contrary to what is fitting-then we should not have to suffer vexation at being hindered in regard to what is principles we have studied, but should find contentment in acting in accordance with them, and we should cease to calculate as we have been wont to do till to-day, ` To-day I read so many lines, wrote so many', and should reckon thus, ` To-day I governed my impulse by what is precepts of what is philosophers, I did not entertain desire, I avoided only things within what is compass of my will, I was not awed by this man or over-persuaded by that man, but trained my faculty of patience, of abstinence, of co-operation' : and then we should give thanks to God for what is gifts for which our thanks are due. As it is, we do not realize that we too, with a difference, behave like what is multitude. Your neighbour fears that he may not become a magistrate, you fear that you may be one. Man, act not so. If you act thus, how shall you be able to say, as Socrates did, ` If God so wills, so be it' ? Do you think that, if Socrates had set his desire on a life of leisure and daily conversation with young men in what is Lyceum or what is Academy, he would have cheerfully gone on all what is campaigns in which he served ? Would he not have groaned and lamented, ` Unhappy that I am, wretched and miserable in what is field, when I might be sunning myself in what is Lyceum'? What? Was this your task in life, to sun yourself? Was it not to have a mind at peace, to be free from hindrance and encumbrance ? Nay, how would he have been Socrates any more, if he had lamented like that ? How could he have written songs of triumph in prison ? In a word, then, remember this, that, whenever you pay regard to anything outside your will's control, you so far destroy your will. And freedom from office lies outside your will just as much as office, leisure just as much as business. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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