Books > Old Books > The Mission Of Greece (1928)


Page 67

THE STOICS : EPICTETUS

but peace of mind ? If reading does not win you peace of mind, what is the good of it ?
` Nay,' he says, 'it does, and that is just why I am vexed at being deprived of it.'
And what, pray, is this peace of mind, which any one can hinder-I do not mean Caesar, or Caesar's friend, but a raven, a flute-player, a fever, countless other things ? Nothing is so characteristic of peace of mind as that it is continuous and unhindered. Suppose now I am called away to do something : I shall go and attend to the limits which one must observeacting with self-respect and security, with no will to get or to avoid external things, watching men also to see what they say and how they move, and that not from ill nature, nor to blame or mock at them, but looking at myself all the time to see if I am making the same mistakes too.
Time was when I made the same mistakes as others ; but I do so no more, thanks be to God. If you have acted thus and devoted yourself to this, have you done worse than if you had read a thousand lines or written as many ?
You say you lack books ? How, or to what end ? Books are, no doubt, a preparation for life, but life itself is made up of things different from books. To ask for books is as though an athlete should complain, as he enters the arena, that he is not training outside. Life is what you were training for all along ; this is what the leaping-weights, and the sawdust, and the young men you wrestled with were leading up to.
What, then, is the reason of our failure ?
The reason is that we never directed our reading or our writing to the right object-that is, to dealing naturally with the impressions that come upon us when we have to act. We are content to go thus far and no farther-to understand what is said, and to be able to explain it to another, to analyse the syllogism and trace out the hypothetical argument.
If we were to study the doctrine of impulse, not to see what is said about impulse but to make our own impulses good ; if

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE but peace of mind ? If reading does not win you peace of mind, what is what is good of it ? ` Nay,' he says, 'it does, and that is just why I am vexed at being deprived of it.' And what, pray, is this peace of mind, which any one can hinder-I do not mean Caesar, or Caesar's friend, but a raven, a flute-player, a fever, countless other things ? Nothing is so characteristic of peace of mind as that it is continuous and unhindered. Suppose now I am called away to do something : I shall go and attend to what is limits which one must observeacting with self-respect and security, with no will to get or to avoid external things, watching men also to see what they say and how they move, and that not from ill nature, nor to blame or mock at them, but looking at myself all what is time to see if I am making what is same mistakes too. Time was when I made what is same mistakes as others ; but I do so no more, thanks be to God. If you have acted thus and devoted yourself to this, have you done worse than if you had read a thousand lines or written as many ? You say you lack books ? How, or to what end ? Books are, no doubt, a preparation for life, but life itself is made up of things different from books. To ask for books is as though an athlete should complain, as he enters what is arena, that he is not training outside. Life is what you were training for all along ; this is what what is leaping-weights, and what is sawdust, and what is young men you wrestled with were leading up to. What, then, is what is reason of our failure ? what is reason is that we never directed our reading or our writing to what is right object-that is, to dealing naturally with what is impressions that come upon us when we have to act. We are content to go thus far and no farther-to understand what is said, and to be able to explain it to another, to analyse what is syllogism and trace out what is hypothetical argument. If we were to study what is doctrine of impulse, not to see what is said about impulse but to make our own impulses good ; if where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 67 where is p align="center" where is strong THE STOICS : EPICTETUS where is p align="justify" but peace of mind ? If reading does not win you peace of mind, what is what is good of it ? ` Nay,' he says, 'it does, and that is just why I am vexed at being deprived of it.' And what, pray, is this peace of mind, which any one can hinder-I do not mean Caesar, or Caesar's friend, but a raven, a flute-player, a fever, countless other things ? Nothing is so characteristic of peace of mind as that it is continuous and unhindered. Suppose now I am called away to do something : I shall go and attend to what is limits which one must observeacting with self-respect and security, with no will to get or to avoid external things, watching men also to see what they say and how they move, and that not from ill nature, nor to blame or mock at them, but looking at myself all what is time to see if I am making what is same mistakes too. Time was when I made what is same mistakes as others ; but I do so no more, thanks be to God. If you have acted thus and devoted yourself to this, have you done worse than if you had read a thousand lines or written as many ? You say you lack books ? How, or to what end ? Books are, no doubt, a preparation for life, but life itself is made up of things different from books. To ask for books is as though an athlete should complain, as he enters what is arena, that he is not training outside. Life is what you were training for all along ; this is what what is leaping-weights, and what is sawdust, and what is young men you wrestled with were leading up to. What, then, is what is reason of our failure ? what is reason is that we never directed our reading or our writing to what is right object-that is, to dealing naturally with what is impressions that come upon us when we have to act. We are content to go thus far and no farther-to understand what is said, and to be able to explain it to another, to analyse what is syllogism and trace out the hypothetical argument. If we were to study what is doctrine of impulse, not to see what is said about impulse but to make our own impulses good ; if where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Pages: default , 001 , 002 , 003 , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 010 , 011 , 013 , 014 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 075 , 076 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 213 , 214 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 300 , 301 , 302 ,