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Page 66

THE STOICS : EPICTETUS

'What conclusion follows? '
Things indifferent concern me not at all.
'Tell me also what you thought were " good things ".'
A right will and a faculty of dealing rightly with impressions. 'And what did you think was the end?' To follow Thee.
` Do you still say that ?'
Yes. I say the same now as before.
Go on then into the palace in confidence and remember these things, and you shall see how a young man who has studied what he ought compares with men who have had no study.

There is nothing with which Epictetus has less sympathy than theory which does not result in practice. He has no
mercy on those who talk like moralists and act like any one else. This is illustrated in his advice to a philosopher who
complained at having to forsake his books for active life and uncongenial society.

REMEMBER that it is not only desire of office and of wealth that makes men abject and subservient to others, but also desire of peace and leisure and travel and learning. Regard for any external thing, whatever it be, makes you subservient to another. What difference does it make, then, whether you desire to be a senator or not to be a senator, to be in office or to be out of office ? What difference is there between saying, ` I am miserable, I don't know what to do, I am tied to my books like a corpse', and saying, ` I am miserable, I have no leisure to read' ? For books, like salutations and office, belong to the outer world which is beyond your own control. If you deny it, tell me why do you want to read ? If you are drawn by the mere pleasure of reading, or by curiosity, you are a trifler, without perseverance : but if you judge it by the true standard, what is that

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE 'What conclusion follows? ' Things indifferent concern me not at all. 'Tell me also what you thought were " good things ".' A right will and a faculty of dealing rightly with impressions. 'And what did you think was what is end?' To follow Thee. ` Do you still say that ?' Yes. I say what is same now as before. Go on then into what is palace in confidence and remember these things, and you shall see how a young man who has studied what he ought compares with men who have had no study. There is nothing with which Epictetus has less sympathy than theory which does not result in practice. He has no mercy on those who talk like moralists and act like any one else. This is illustrated in his advice to a philosopher who complained at having to forsake his books for active life and uncongenial society. REMEMBER that it is not only desire of office and of wealth that makes men abject and subservient to others, but also desire of peace and leisure and travel and learning. Regard for any external thing, whatever it be, makes you subservient to another. What difference does it make, then, whether you desire to be a senator or not to be a senator, to be in office or to be out of office ? What difference is there between saying, ` I am miserable, I don't know what to do, I am tied to my books like a corpse', and saying, ` I am miserable, I have no leisure to read' ? For books, like salutations and office, belong to what is outer world which is beyond your own control. If you deny it, tell me why do you want to read ? If you are drawn by what is mere pleasure of reading, or by curiosity, you are a trifler, without perseverance : but if you judge it by what is true standard, what is that where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 66 where is p align="center" where is strong THE STOICS : EPICTETUS where is p align="justify" 'What conclusion follows? ' Things indifferent concern me not at all. 'Tell me also what you thought were " good things ".' A right will and a faculty of dealing rightly with impressions. 'And what did you think was what is end?' To follow Thee. ` Do you still say that ?' Yes. I say what is same now as before. Go on then into what is palace in confidence and remember these things, and you shall see how a young man who has studied what he ought compares with men who have had no study. There is nothing with which Epictetus has less sympathy than theory which does not result in practice. He has no mercy on those who talk like moralists and act like any one else. This is illustrated in his advice to a philosopher who complained at having to forsake his books for active life and uncongenial society. REMEMBER that it is not only desire of office and of wealth that makes men abject and subservient to others, but also desire of peace and leisure and travel and learning. Regard for any external thing, whatever it be, makes you subservient to another. What difference does it make, then, whether you desire to be a senator or not to be a senator, to be in office or to be out of office ? What difference is there between saying, ` I am miserable, I don't know what to do, I am tied to my books like a corpse', and saying, ` I am miserable, I have no leisure to read' ? For books, like salutations and office, belong to what is outer world which is beyond your own control. If you deny it, tell me why do you want to read ? If you are drawn by what is mere pleasure of reading, or by curiosity, you are a trifler, without perseverance : but if you judge it by what is true standard, what is that where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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