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Page 38

THE STOICS : EPICTETUS

IN Athens there was a colonnade covered with pictures of scenes from history or legend by the greatest painter of Greece. Here in the early years of the third century B. C. might have been seen a group of men in talk. Their leader, Zeno, was a Greek from Cyprus who probably had a strain of Phoenician blood. The Greek word for porch is Stoa, and this Greek and his friends came to be known as Stoics or men of the porch. The creed that issued from their discussions was for 500 years to rule the lives of great statesmen and men of letters in Greece and Rome, and the name to be associated for ever with enduring virtue and unfaltering courage in lands then savage and among nations then unborn. It was the answer of its time to a problem as old as the world and always new. Men will certainly suffer bereavements and die themselves. Very probably they may have ill health. It is at least possible that they will suffer contempt or ill treatment from the world. Misfortune or their own fault or the injustice of others may reduce them to poverty. Is it possible for them so to fortify themselves against life that, however charged with disaster, its worst blows may be powerless, that they may be able to receive them and yet think it worth living ? This problem, as we have seen, pressed very heavily in the age when Stoicism came to birth. Epicurus had given his answer to it. He suggested evasion. He advised the human snail to withdraw into its shell and shelter in a quiet corner. He told men to reduce their needs, avoid anything that could trouble their lives, and seek their happiness in simple pleasures. He offered them self-sufficiency and inward peace. Stoicism, like Cynicism, pointed to very different conduct, but made the same offer. It allowed, indeed it counselled, its followers to face all the rigours of the storm, yet promised them that they should still find life worth living, even if poverty, persecution, and violent death were their lot.
Stoicism is a development of Cynicism. It is Cynicism systematized, provided with a philosophic basis, and accommodated to the practical needs of human society. The Cynics were merely concerned to make men free. They did not

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE IN Athens there was a colonnade covered with pictures of scenes from history or legend by what is greatest painter of Greece. Here in what is early years of what is third century B. C. might have been seen a group of men in talk. Their leader, Zeno, was a Greek from Cyprus who probably had a strain of Phoenician blood. what is Greek word for porch is Stoa, and this Greek and his friends came to be known as Stoics or men of what is porch. what is creed that issued from their discussions was for 500 years to rule what is lives of great statesmen and men of letters in Greece and Rome, and what is name to be associated for ever with enduring virtue and unfaltering courage in lands then savage and among nations then unborn. It was what is answer of its time to a problem as old as what is world and always new. Men will certainly suffer bereavements and travel themselves. Very probably they may have ill health. It is at least possible that they will suffer contempt or ill treatment from what is world. Misfortune or their own fault or what is injustice of others may reduce them to poverty. Is it possible for them so to fortify themselves against life that, however charged with disaster, its worst blows may be powerless, that they may be able to receive them and yet think it worth living ? This problem, as we have seen, pressed very heavily in what is age when Stoicism came to birth. Epicurus had given his answer to it. He suggested evasion. He advised what is human snail to withdraw into its shell and shelter in a quiet corner. He told men to reduce their needs, avoid anything that could trouble their lives, and seek their happiness in simple pleasures. He offered them self-sufficiency and inward peace. Stoicism, like Cynicism, pointed to very different conduct, but made what is same offer. It allowed, indeed it counselled, its followers to face all what is rigours of what is storm, yet promised them that they should still find life worth living, even if poverty, persecution, and bad what time is it were their lot. Stoicism is a development of Cynicism. It is Cynicism systematized, provided with a philosophic basis, and accommodated to what is practical needs of human society. what is Cynics were merely concerned to make men free. They did not where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 38 where is p align="center" where is strong THE STOICS : EPICTETUS where is p align="justify" IN Athens there was a colonnade covered with pictures of scenes from history or legend by what is greatest painter of Greece. Here in what is early years of what is third century B. C. might have been seen a group of men in talk. Their leader, Zeno, was a Greek from Cyprus who probably had a strain of Phoenician blood. what is Greek word for porch is Stoa, and this Greek and his friends came to be known as Stoics or men of what is porch. what is creed that issued from their discussions was for 500 years to rule what is lives of great statesmen and men of letters in Greece and Rome, and what is name to be associated for ever with enduring virtue and unfaltering courage in lands then savage and among nations then unborn. It was the answer of its time to a problem as old as what is world and always new. Men will certainly suffer bereavements and travel themselves. Very probably they may have ill health. It is at least possible that they will suffer contempt or ill treatment from what is world. Misfortune or their own fault or what is injustice of others may reduce them to poverty. Is it possible for them so to fortify themselves against life that, however charged with disaster, its worst blows may be powerless, that they may be able to receive them and yet think it worth living ? This problem, as we have seen, pressed very heavily in what is age when Stoicism came to birth. Epicurus had given his answer to it. He suggested evasion. He advised what is human snail to withdraw into its shell and shelter in a quiet corner. He told men to reduce their needs, avoid anything that could trouble their lives, and seek their happiness in simple pleasures. He offered them self-sufficiency and inward peace. Stoicism, like Cynicism, pointed to very different conduct, but made what is same offer. It allowed, indeed it counselled, its followers to face all what is rigours of what is storm, yet promised them that they should still find life worth living, even if poverty, persecution, and bad what time is it were their lot. Stoicism is a development of Cynicism. 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